Chief Arvol Looking Horse and Dan Wahpepah share with Raven about this year World Peace and Prayer Day 2015, on KAOS radio, March 29,th 4-5pm

Chief Arvol Looking Horse founder of World Peace and Prayer Day. Chief Arvol Looking Horse is the 19th generation keeper of the White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundleand holds the responsibility of spiritual leader among the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota People.

He will be joined with:

Indigenous community leader Dan Wahpepah, Anishinabe/Kickapoo, Sac and Fox .  Dan is one of the founders of Red Earth Descendants. Red Earth Descendants will be hosting World Peace and Prayer Day 2015 in Ahsland Oregon.

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David Troutt director of Nisqually Indian Tribe Natural Resources, visits with Raven on March 29th, 2015 at 5pm

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David Troutt is director of Nisqually Indian Tribe Natural Resources and chair of Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Council

David Troutt, of Dupont, has served as the natural resources director for the Nisqually Indian Tribe since 1987. He heads a diverse department comprised of salmon harvest management, two large salmon hatcheries, shellfish management, data operations, environmental management, wildlife management, legal, administration, and budget development and monitoring. He also serves as chair of the Nisqually River Council and president of the Nisqually River Foundation. Mr. Troutt also has served on the Washington Biodiversity Council, the Executive Committee of the Tri-County Response to the Endangered Species Act, the Development Committee of the Shared Strategy for Puget Sound, the Steering Committee for the Hatchery Reform Project, and as a voting member of the Resource Advisory Committee for the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Mr. Troutt received his bachelor of science degree from the University of Washington School of Fisheries.

To save orcas, we must save salmon

Salmon scientists zoom in on plankton

Raven visits with Peter Ali on “Make No Bones About It.” March 22, 2015 at 4-5pm

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Peter Ali is  a well known Native American Flutist, a teacher,  storyteller  and more. Learn about Peter Ali this week on KAOS 89.3 fm , Olympia.

Alan Parker, a Citizen of the Chippewa Cree Tribal Nation, on “Make No Bones About It.” 3-15-2015, 5pm

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Alan Parker, a Citizen of the Chippewa Cree Tribal Nation, serves as Adjunct Faculty for Tribal Students enrolled in the Indigenous Development and Advancement PhD program at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

Alan Parker served as Staff Director, Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Washington, DC, where was appointed by Senator Daniel K Inouye, Chairman of the Committee. His responsibilities as Staff Director included the development of a comprehensive legislative program for the Committee. Major legislative initiatives of the Committee during this time included the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, the National Museum of American Indian Act, the Indian Self-Governance Act, the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act and the Indian Housing Act. In the 1980’s, Alan served as President, The American Indian National Bank, Washington, DC. The AINB was the only National Bank in the US owned and operated by Indian Tribes. Established in 1974, the Tribal Shareholders engaged in commercial banking serving a market of Tribal Business enterprises. Prior to this, he was appointed by Sen. James Abourezk and served as Chief Counsel, Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Washington, DC, from April 1977 until July 1980. The Select Committee was created to serve as the first independent legislative Committee within the US Congress with responsibility for all legislative proposals dealing with Native American issues and concerns. They also exercised congressional oversight authority over federal agencies and offices charged with US Trust Responsibilities and public services for the 350 Indian Tribal and Alaska Native communities located in the US. Major legislative activities conducted under Parker’s term in this office included The Indian Child Welfare Act, The American Indian Religious Freedom Act, and Tribal Colleges authorizing Authority as well as historical Indian Land and Water Rights Legislative Settlements.

Education Achievements: Parker attended UCLA School of Law, Los Angeles, California, where he received a Juris Doctor degree in June 1972. Parker’s work researching Tribal and State Court Relationships led to publication of his work in the University of Montana Law Review

Military Service: In June 1965 Parker was drafted into the US Army and was sent to Officer Candidate School where he received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Signal Corps and served until August 1968 when he was honorably discharged. Prior to being discharged he was awarded a Bronze Star medal for meritorious service under combat conditions in the Republic of South Vietnam.

Roger Fernandes on Make No Bones About It. 3-8-2015

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World Peace and Prayer Day 2015

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Joy Harjo, Muscogee Creek poet, musician and performer will be speaking and sharing at The Evergreen State College March 2, 2015 at 7pm

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Joy Harjo, Muscogee Creek poet, musician and performer will be speaking and sharing some of her works as a Native writer on March 2, at 7:00PM.  The event will be in Recital Hall at the Communications Building at The Evergreen State College.

Parking is $2.00.

Joy Harjo was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma and is a member of the Mvskoke Nation. Her seven books of poetry, which includes such well-known titles as How We Became Human- New and Selected Poems, The Woman Who Fell From the Sky, and She Had Some Horses have garnered many awards.  These include the New Mexico Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas; and the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America. For A Girl Becoming, a young adult/coming of age book, was released in 2009 and is Harjo’s most recent publication.

Her work is politically insightful and visionary, and speaks to what humans need to do to live in harmony and protect the planet and have good relations with one another and the natural world. She has earned her reputation as one of the finest American and Native American writers because she has the ability to talk with such insight about the human condition.

Read more about her on her website:

http://joyharjo.com/