In The Light of Reverence


Documentary exploring Hopi, Lakota, and Wintu relatedness and responsibility to the land and efforts to sustain and protect Indigenous religion. I have posted this documentary to give access to students in my Native American Philosophy and Introduction to Native American Studies courses.

Tom Goldtooth on “Make No Bones About It”. October 25th, 2015 at 4pm


Tom Goldtooth (Dine’ and Dakota), Executive Director – Tom is Dine’ and Dakota and lives in Minnesota. Since the late 1980’s, Tom has been involved with environmental related issues and programs working within tribal governments in developing indigenous-based environmental protection infrastructures. Tom works with indigenous peoples worldwide. Tom is known as one of the environmental justice movement grassroots leaders in North America addressing toxics and health, mining, energy, climate, water, globalization, sustainable development and indigenous rights issues. Tom is one of the founders of the Durban Group for Climate Justice; co-founder of Climate Justice NOW!; a co-founder of the U.S. based Environmental Justice Climate Change initiative and a member of the International Indigenous Peoples Forum on Climate Change that operates as the indigenous caucus within the United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change. Tom is a policy adviser to indigenous communities on environmental protection and more recently on climate policy focusing on mitigation, adaptation and concerns of false solutions.
Bemidji, MN 56619

Tom Goldtooth will be at the 1st annual Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium will be held at The Evergreen State College Longhouse on November 5-6, 2015. It will bring together speakers from Native communities that are working to keep fossil fuels in the ground, by stopping coal terminals, oil trains and fracking, and protecting treaty resources from the threat of climate change. Its major goal would be to get students and youth, particularly tribal youth, involved in community-based climate justice efforts. All events are free and open to Evergreen students and the public (please inform the organizers about any classes that may attend).

(7:00 – 9:30 pm)
Indigenous Environmental Network Executive Director:
“The Paris Climate Accord: Will it be a Crime Against Humanity and Mother Earth?”

The Symposium is an outgrowth of the Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Project at Evergreen, started by the Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute. The Project published a 2006 report for Indigenous leadership, a 2010 community organizing booklet, and the 2012 Oregon State University Press anthology “Asserting Native Resilience: Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Face the Climate Crisis.” For these publications, see

The Symposium is sponsored by the Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Project, and hosted by the Resource Rebels program, with support from the Graduate Program on the Environment, Master of Public Administration – Tribal Governance, Native Programs and Sustainability & Justice planning units, President’s Diversity Fund, Clean Energy Committee, Academic Deans’ Office, and Evergreen programs Engaging with Endangered Northwest, Shipping Out & Writing Home, Caliban & the Witch, Even When Erased We Exist, and Introduction to Environmental Studies.

For more information, contact Shangrila Joshi Wynn:

Invite friends on the Facebook event page at

You can download an 8.5″x 11″ poster for the Indigenous Climate Justice Symposium
(Nov. 5-6, at the Evergreen Longhouse):

Indigenous Peoples Day 2015

Citizens urge Olympia to recognize Indigenous People’s Day in 2015

Olympia’s first Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration set for Oct. 12

Olympia to honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Indigenous Peoples Day pays respect to Olympia’s tribal past, present and future

Downtown Olympia mural honors Native American activist Leonard Peltier

Free Leonard Peltier!


A shout out to Olympia, WA: You’re invited to the unveiling of a new mural in honor of Leonard Peltier, Monday, 12 October, noon-3:00 p.m. 421 4th East. See you there!

Olympia’s first Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration set for Oct. 12 -From Olympian Newspaper

Victory Song

Victory Song

Staff writer

Olympia’s first Indigenous Peoples’ Day will be celebrated Monday with a tribute to the area’s Native American heritage.

The family-friendly event will run from 4-8 p.m. at Sylvester Park, located at Capitol Way and Legion Way in downtown Olympia. Representatives from local tribes, including Lummi, Nisqually, Puyallup, Squaxin, Quileute and others, are scheduled to speak.

Olympia recently joined a short list of cities to declare the second Monday in October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day. This date is typically observed as Columbus Day, a legal holiday in some states that honors the arrival of European explorer Christopher Columbus in the Americas.

However, history often glosses over the atrocities associated with the arrival of Europeans: slavery, genocide and the brutal exploitation of Native Americans.

“Most Americans are in complete denial of what happened here in the Americas,” said Brian Frisina, also known as Raven Redbone, who hosts a weekly radio program about indigenous peoples on KAOS-89.3 FM. “It was a big step for the city of Olympia to make that move toward healing and reconciliation with the tribes.”

The seeds for the local Indigenous Peoples’ Day were planted in October 2014, when organizer Lucas Anderson and several supporters urged the Olympia City Council to rename Columbus Day.

One year later, Anderson is amazed at the way Olympia has embraced the concept. He hopes to see the movement spread across Washington.

“That shows a lot of people are more educated and aware of some of the things that are misportrayed in history,” he said. “Olympia is really smart to just go ahead and do this now.”

Monday’s event will start with a welcome from the Nisqually and Squaxin tribes along with songs from the Squaxin Island Drum Group, according to organizers. Other participants will include:

▪ Nancy Shippentower-Games, a tribal leader with the Puyallup Nation.

▪ State Sen. John McCoy, a Democrat from the Tulalip Nation who successfully pushed for teaching tribal history in the state’s public schools.

▪ Swil Kanim of the Lummi Nation, who is a violin virtuoso, native storyteller and actor.

▪ DouGlas Skarhoniatai of the Mohawk Nation, who will share songs and debut “Uncle Billy Says.”

▪ Olympia resident Ben Sittingbull of the Lakota Nation.

▪ The Native Student Alliance from The Evergreen State College.

▪ Olympia Mayor Stephen Buxbaum and Mayor Pro-tem Nathaniel Jones.

Read more here:

Eddie Little Crow, Lakota shares on Make No Bones About. October 11th, 2015 at 4pm

Eddie Little Crow

Eddie Little Crow

Ed Little Crow is Lakota, Dakota member of the Elders Council in S. Oregon, veteran of the Seige of Wounded Knee, 1973, father and poet. His years as a quiet, steady force in the Oregon communities within which he has lived, worked and prayed have etched themselves into the psyche of all he meets.

Ira Coyne, Chauncey Peltier share about the Mural dedicated to Leonard Peltier October 11th, 2015 at 5pm


A local sign painter and muralist in Olympia, Ira Coyne, heard Chauncey interviewed by Raven Redbone on his show Make No Bones About it on KAOS radio. When Ira learned Leonard was a painter, he looked up his work and was taken by the pink lion depicted in Stalking. He then reached out to Raven and Chauncey to turn this piece into a mural at our city’s artesian well. Chauncey is now in Olympia for the week to work on the mural with Ira and anyone else who shows up at the well to lend a hand. (The official ribbon cutting for the mural will coincide with Olympia’s Inaugural Indigenous Peoples Day, this Monday October 12, at 12:00 pm by Olympia’s Artesian Well.)

Mask Magazine Article

Who is Leonard Peltier?