Sandy White Hawk on “Make No Bones About It” May 17th, 2015 at 4pm

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Wicoicage Aki Un Ku Pi

Generation After Generation We Are Coming Home

Sandra White Hawk is a Sicangu Lakota adoptee from the Rosebud Reservation, South Dakota. She is the founder and Director of First Nations Repatriation Institute.

First Nations Repatriation Institute (FNRI) is the first organization of its kind whose goal it is to create a resource for First Nations people impacted by foster care or adoption to return home, reconnect, and reclaim their identity.  The Institute also serves as a resource to enhance the knowledge and skills of practitioners who serve First Nations people.

Sandra organizes Truth Healing Reconciliation Community Forums that bring together adoptees/fostered individuals and their families and professionals with the goal to identify post adoption issues and to identify strategies that will prevent removal of First Nations children.  She has also initiated an ongoing support group for adoptees and birth relatives in the Twin Cities Area.

Sandra has become a spokesperson on the issues of the adoption and the foster care system and how it has impacted First Nations People. She has traveled throughout the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Australia and Japan, Alaska sharing her inspirational story of healing.

She is a Commissioner for the Maine Wabanaki State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission and serves as an Honorary Witness of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Residential Schools in Canada

She is a contributing author to Outsiders Within, J. J. Trenka, J. C. Oparah & S. Y. Shin (Eds.), Outsiders within: Writing on transracial adoption (pp.). Cambridge, MA, South End Press,  Parenting as Adoptees, Adam Chau, Kevin Ost-Vollmers (Editors) and The Kinship Parenting Toolbox, Edited by Kim Phagan-Hansel

Sandra was awarded the Women in Wellbriety Dana Tiger Award for Creating Change in Nations, named one of the Innovators in Color Lines Magazine, named one of the 50 Visionaries Who are Changing Your World, Utne Reader, named Outstanding Native Women Award from the University of Minnesota 2003 and was named one of the “50 Most Influential and Cool People” of Madison, WI, in Madison Magazine, November 2002.

 WE ARE COMING HOME

Protecting and Restoring the Sacred with Chief Phil Lane, Jr, May 3, 2015, 4-5 pm on “Make No Bones About It.”

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An Invitation from Chief Phil Lane, Jr.:

At this unique and unprecedented moment in human history – in the midst of mounting social, political, economic, psychological and spiritual restlessness and uncertainty – there exists an unnamed rootlessness that permeates the very heart of the Human Family and condition.

And it is time to name it.

Too many human beings in the modern world have been in the pursuit of the industrial and material dream severed from our Indigenous Spirits. We have forgotten how to live in harmony on our Mother Earth, and have thus lost touch with our Indigenous Roots and our intimate connection to one another and all Life!

We are all part of the ancient Sacred Circle of Life, and therefore we are all Indigenous Peoples of Mother Earth. The essential truth of this reality cannot be denied no matter how we look at it; it is simply an irrevocable truth.

To embrace and reclaim our Indigenous relationship to all Life is to remember and lovingly celebrate our sacred relationship with our Mother Earth, all relatives of our One Human Family and our kinship with all Life.

The realization of this truth renders any form of prejudice intolerable, and equally renders any form of mistreatment of our sacred Mother Earth as completely unacceptable.

We have experienced a Great Spiritual Wintertime in the past 500 years. This has been a time of conquest, colonization and assimilation that has been filled with the utmost human cruelty, violence, injustice, abuse and physical and cultural genocide.

What we are finally discovering, however, is that the ”Hurt of One is the Hurt of All,” and that such actions strip away our essential humanity along with all things that make life worth living!

The global crises we experience today are additionally fueled by our belief in separation… a myth that has convinced us that we are separate from one another and separate from the Natural World. This has further channeled into the destructive belief that we are not whole and that we are hopelessly inadequate.

The industrial and material dream is given power by our sense of lost connection and wholeness with ourselves, each other and our Mother Earth.

It persuades and propels us to consume to no end, in a feeble attempt to recover a wholeness that cannot be bought or filled with material things.

It thrives on our inability to recall the ways of the ancestors, and celebrates the forgetting of our own sacredness as Sacred Beings.

For when we recognize the sacred within ourselves, we see it in all other things.

But this is all changing. It has been prophesied that a Great Spiritual Springtime would emerge out of this unimaginable darkness.

We live now not in the days of the prophecies, but in the days of the fulfillment of the prophecies.

As foretold by the Elders, the Indigenous Peoples of the world are reawakening to their spiritual and cultural identities. They are demonstrating to all members of the Human Family how to walk the Fourth Way, the Beauty Way… the Path that transcends assimilation, resignation and conflict to a new place of understanding, reconciliation and healing broken trusts!

This Sacred Path of the Fourth Way must be walked together in unprecedented, unified action to manifest World Peace – the Day that will not be followed by night!

We, the First Nation Indigenous Peoples have a strong, enduring and unbreakable spiritual foundation of cultural values and guiding principles. These have empowered us to survive and arise in the face of unspeakable hardship and suffering, yet we stand with greater strength and wisdom than ever before.

So we invite you, Our Beloved Relatives, to reawaken with us to what is already within each of us – the Unity of One Human Family and all Life.

We offer you our heartfelt greeting of solidarity and our shared wisdom of 16 Indigenous Guiding Principles to ensure that we may walk together on a Sacred Path that fully honors the Natural Laws and rights of Mother Earth!

This new Spiritual Springtime foretold by our Elders is now unfolding globally… as sure as the sun rises every morning.

My Beloved Relative, it would be an honor for you to join us.

Your brother,

Chief Phil Lane, Jr.

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An Invitation from Chief Phil Lane

Goodthinking shares with Raven Redbone on KAOS 89.3 fm, April 26th, 2015 at 5:30

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Goodthinking 4 All Our Relations is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit organized in July 2009, to address and meet the needs of the seemingly forgotten and overlooked children and Elders in “Indian Country.” Goodthinking 4 All Our Relations operates under the jurisdiction of a covenant with Creation. Through the Traditional Ceremonies, Teachings, and Guidance of our Elders, we understand it is time to make a difference. In order to systemically address issues of suicide, substance abuse, health disparities, and domestic violence, we must first address basic physiological needs for water, food, and safety. When people are fighting merely to survive there is not time for them to think of ways in which to thrive.

More Info click here 

Deloria Many Grey Horses shares on “Make No Bones About It.” 4-26-2015 at 4:30 pm

10511600_10104143737982673_5751566715818436358_oDeloria Many Grey Horses‘ projects give voice to at-risk Indigenous youth. Many Grey Horses draws out the youths’ perspectives and cultural understandings from their stories. As one of the main youth leaders in a documentary, A Place at the Table, she helped to spread awareness on what it means to live in mainstream culture while holding on to your roots. Many Grey Horses worked in Thailand, Cambodia, the Philippines, and Indonesia, on behalf of the Four Worlds International Institute, with the Canadian Government funded SEARCH Project. This initiative worked with Regional Southeast Asia Partners for Advancing Human Rights, Gender Issues, Child Protection, Ethnic Minorities and Indigenous Peoples.

This initiative focused on curriculum development and facilitating training programs for co-creating community-based social media, improving digital literacy and strengthening digital technology capacities for regional, national and local NGO’s. Many Grey Horses’ work has a special emphasis on ethnic minority and Indigenous young peoples and their communities. Her recent work as project manager of the Manual of Aboriginal Best Practices in Sports and Wellbeing is aimed at a young audience. The manual helps young Indigenous people deal with cultural identity loss and emotional disconnection amidst other social and economic pressures. An Aboriginal engagement consultant at the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate in Alberta, Many Grey Horses’ work addresses the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health of Indigenous youth. She notes that 68% of young people in care in Alberta are Indigenous and in Edmonton, the percentage of Indigenous youth in the criminal justice system hovers around 80%. In this role, she is dedicated to creating a strong relationship between Indigenous communities and government, provide cultural awareness training for youth serving agencies and provide rights based training to youth in care and in the criminal justice system. From the Kainai Nation, Many Grey Horses uses storytelling as a vehicle to deliver each person’s message. She gives Indigenous young people personal freedom to express themselves.

http://fwii.net

Sylvia McAdam on KAOS 89.3 fm, on April 26th at 4pm

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Quanah Parker Brightman on KAOS Radio 89.3 fm on April 26, 2015 at 5pm

Quanah Parker Brightman in Washington D.C.

Quanah Parker Brightman is a Lakota Sioux and Creek Indian who was born in Oakland California. Quanah Brightman is the National President of United Native Americans Inc., a non-profit indigenous movement organization formed by Dr. Lehman L. Brightman in San Francisco, California in 1968 to promote the decolonization and unity of all Indigenous People.

In his capacity as member of UNA, Mr. Brightman has testified before the United Nations Listening Sessions and the U.S. Department of Education’s Urban Indian Education Listening and Learning Sessions and founded Idle No More in the San Francisco Bay Area. .

Quanah Parker Brightman has led and participated in many pro-indigenous protests, marches, and sit-ins throughout the United States. Mr. Brightman is a strong advocate against the many hate crimes that are affecting Indigenous people around the world. He advocates for the enforcement of all indigenous treaties made with the United States, reparations and accountability of the theft of tribal ancestral lands and natural resources, the protection of Native American sacred sites and burial sites, pro-indigenous curriculum to be taught in public schools (K-12), ending the use of the blood quantum, improving the negative image of indigenous people and ending tribal corruption in Indian gaming.

If you are interested in scheduling Quanah Parker Brightman to present a workshop or be a guest lecturer, please call (510)672-7187 or qbrightman75@hotmail.com

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz speaks in Olympia on May 4 and 5 about her new book An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States.

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz speaks in Olympia on May 4 and 5 about her new book An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States.

Native American feminist scholar and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz will be speaking in Olympia on Monday, May 4, and Tuesday, May 5, about her new Beacon Press book An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States. She will be speaking at Olympia Timberland Library on Monday, May 4, at 6:30-7:45 pm, and at the Evergreen Longhouse on Tuesday, May 5, at 7:00-9:00 pm. The events are free and open to the public. Download and print the poster for the May 5 Evergreen event:

http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/RoxannePoster.pdf

The publisher describes the book: “Today, in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized indigenous communities and nations comprising nearly three million people. These individuals are the descendants of the once fifteen million people who inhabited this land and are the subject of the latest book by noted historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz.  In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the indigenous peoples was genocidal and imperialist–designed to crush the original inhabitants. Spanning more than three hundred years, this classic bottom-up history significantly reframes how we view our past. Told from the viewpoint of the indigenous, it reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the U.S. empire.”

An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States provides an essential historical reference for all Americans. . . . The American Indians’ perspective has been absent from colonial histories for too long, leaving continued misunderstandings of our struggles for sovereignty and human rights.”
Peterson Zah, former president of the Navajo Nation

“Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz writes a masterful story that relates what the Indigenous peoples of the United States have always maintained: Against the settler U.S. nation, Indigenous peoples have persevered against actions and policies intended to exterminate them, whether physically, mentally, or intellectually. Indigenous nations and their people continue to bear witness to their experiences under the U.S. and demand justice as well as the realization of sovereignty on their own terms.”
–Jennifer Nez Denetdale, Associate Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico and author of Reclaiming Diné History

An Indigenous Peoples’ History …pulls up the paving stones and lays bare the deep history of the United States, from the corn to the reservations. If the United States is a ‘crime scene,’ as she calls it, then Dunbar-Ortiz is its forensic scientist. A sobering look at a grave history.”
Vijay Prashad, author of The Poorer Nations

“Justice-seekers everywhere will celebrate Dunbar-Ortiz’s unflinching commitment to truth—a truth that places settler-colonialism and genocide exactly where they belong: as foundational to the existence of the United States.”
Waziyatawin, PhD, activist and author of For Indigenous Minds Only
More background on the book at http://www.beacon.org/An-Indigenous-Peoples-History-of-the-United-States-P1041.aspx

About Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, daughter of a landless farmer and half-Indian mother. Her paternal grandfather, a white settler, farmer, and veterinarian, had been a labor activist and Socialist in Oklahoma with the Industrial Workers of the World in the first two decades of the twentieth century. The stories of her grandfather inspired her to lifelong social justice activism. Married at eighteen, she left with her husband for San Francisco, California, where she has lived most of the years since, although the marriage ended. Her account of life up to leaving Oklahoma is recorded in Red Dirt: Growing Up Okie. She has a daughter, Michelle.

Roxanne graduated, majoring in History, from San Francisco State College, a working class public institution, but was selected for History graduate school at University of California at Berkeley, transferring to University of California, Los Angeles to complete her doctorate in History. From 1967 to 1972, she was a full time activist living in various parts of the United States, traveling to Europe, Mexico, and Cuba. This time of her life and the aftermath, 1960-1975, is the story told in Outlaw Woman: Memoir of the War Years.

Roxanne took a position teaching in a newly established Native American Studies program at California State University at Hayward, near San Francisco, and helped develop the Department of Ethnic Studies, as well as Women’s Studies. In 1974, she became active in the American Indian Movement (AIM) and the International Indian Treaty Council, beginning a lifelong commitment to international human rights.

Her first published book, The Great Sioux Nation: An Oral History of the Sioux Nation and its Struggle for Sovereignty, was published in 1977 and was presented as the fundamental document at the first international conference on Indians of the Americas, held at United Nations’ headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. That book was followed by two others in the following years: Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico, 1680-1980 and Indians of the Americas: Human Rights and Self-Determination.  In over a hundred trips to Nicaragua and Honduras from 1981 to 1989, she monitored what was called the Contra War. Her book, Blood on the Border: A Memoir of the Contra War was published in 2005.

More background on the author at http://www.reddirtsite.com

Sponsors

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz’s visit is sponsored by the Evergreen program “Native Decolonization in the Pacific Rim: From the Northwest to New Zealand,” in collaboration with the TESC President’s Diversity Fund, Longhouse Education and Cultural Center, Native Programs at Evergreen, Olympia Timberland Library, Friends of the Library, Center for Community-Based Learning and Action, TESC Tacoma, & TESC programs “Current Economic & Social Issues,” “Reflecting on Activism,” and “Branching Out: Ethnobotanical Gardens.”For background on Native Programs at Evergreen: http://www.evergreen.edu/nativeprograms

Directions

 

The Olympia Timberland Library is located at 313 8th Ave SE. The Evergreen State College is located at 2700 Evergreen Parkway NW (the closest parking will be in the B Lot; turn to the left as you drive into campus, and walk the footpath to the Longhouse).

Please invite others and share on the facebook event page:

https://www.facebook.com/events/1600612936891836/

Download and print the poster for the May 4 Library event:

http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/RoxanneLibrary.jpg

Download and print the poster for the May 5 Evergreen event:

http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/RoxannePoster.pdf

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