Tag Archives: Tar Sands

Joey Gray on the next Make No Bones About it. October 20th at 5pm

JG at INM Jan 2013 UW

Joey Gray (Métis, Okanagan, European) is a computer systems and management consultant for nonprofit organizations. She’s a lifelong organizer who led an international movement to integrate team sport so that women and men now compete together as equals at the top levels of play. Locally around the Salish Sea, nationally in the U.S. and Canada, and internationally from Asia to Europe, Joey co-founded, directed, coached, and oversaw national and world championships, recreation programs, organizations, teams, …and other events. She had the honor to act as head official for a new sport in The World Games held under the patronage of the International Olympic Committee, and to award the medals four years later.
But even as Secretary-General and Treasurer on the Executive Committee of a world sport federation – one of few women in such a leadership role – Joey recognized that modern sport as we know it is unsustainable. The championship system and any legitimacy that comes from it is dependent on artificially cheap fuel and excessive waste. We know it’s destructive. It’s destructive not only for Indigenous people worldwide, but for every living thing affected by pollution and climate change.
So several years ago, Joey re-directed her efforts to instead support a wide range of environmental and education groups, campaigns, and peaceful grassroots actions. She stopped flying, doesn’t own a car, lives in a tiny place, and, along with many other caring people, uses her information systems skills and nonprofit leadership experience to make choices like these more and more appealing and fun for all — especially bicycle infrastructure, growing food, politics, conservation, education, and leaving terrible toxic tar sands in the ground right where it belongs. @tarsandsactionseattle

Jewel James on “Make No Bones About It.” May 19th at 5pm

TSLEIL-WAUTUTH NATION - National and International Indigenous

Jewell James is Coordinator for the Lummi Treaty Protection Task Force and Chairman of the Board of the Kluckhohn Research Center. We will be visiting about Tar Sands, No Coal Trains, Water and Treaty Rights.
contact Jewell James at email at jewellj@treatyprotection.org.
Image with caption: “Standing from right to left: National Chief Shawn-A-in-chut Atleo, Hereditary Chief Phil Lane Jr. of the Ihanktonwan Dakota and Chickasaw Nations, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, and Deborah Parker, Vice Chair Woman of the Tulalip Tribes. Sitting in front right to left: Chief Maureen Thomas of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, Jewell James of the Lummi Tribe.
“(CNW Group/Tsleil-Waututh Nation)”.

Raven vists with Clayton Thomas-Muller on Defending Mother Earth 1-22-2012 at 4pm

Clayton Thomas-Muller Canadian Indigenous Tar Sands Campaign – Clayton Thomas-Muller, of the Mathias Colomb Cree Nation also known as Pukatawagan in Northern Manitoba, Canada, is an activist for Indigenous rights and environmental justice. With his roots in the inner city of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, Clayton began his work as a community organizer, working with Aboriginal youth. Over the years Clayton work has taken him to five continents across our Mother Earth. Based out of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Clayton is involved in many initiatives to support the building of an inclusive movement for Energy and Climate Justice. He serves on the board of the Collective Heritage Institute (CHI), which hosts the annual Bioneers Conference in Marin, California and on the board of the Global Justice Ecology Project. Recognized by Utne Magazine as one of the top 30 under 30 activists in the United States and as a limate Hero2009 by Yes Magazine, Clayton is the tar sands campaign organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network. He works across Canada, Alaska and the lower 48 states with grassroots indigenous communities to defend against the sprawling infrastructure that includes pipelines, refineries and extraction associated with the tar sands, the largest and most destructive industrial development in the history of mankind.

Ottawa, Ontario Canadian Office:
Tel: 613 237 1717 ext. 106
Email: ienoil@igc.org
Twitter: @claytonIEN
Skype: monsterredlight


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Melina LaboucanMassimo Cree First Nation : Speaks on the Tar Sands

Melina Laboucan-Massimo is Lubicon Cree from Northern Alberta and is helping lead a delegation of indigenous leaders from Canada and the United States to take part in the Tar Sands Action. She has been working as an advocate for Indigenous rights for the past 10 years. She has written articles and produced a short documentary for Redwire Media Society covering topics ranging from the tar sands to inherent treaty rights and cultural appropriation. She has studied and worked in Australia, Brazil, Mexico, and Canada, with a focus on Indigenous rights and culture, resource extraction and international diplomacy. Before joining Greenpeace as a tar sands campaigner in Alberta in April 2009, she was pursuing her Masters in Environmental Studies at York University.

Melina has campaigned to raise awareness about the recent oil spill in the Peace River watershed in Alberta. She is featured in Greenpeace’s photo essay about the spill and its impact on local communities.

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