Tag Archives: Free Leonard Peltier

Free showing of the film: Incident at Oglala

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Free showing of the film: Incident at Oglala

February 26th, 2016
6pm
906 Columbia Street SE Olympia 98501 David William Building 2nd Floor
Olympia, WA 98506
Robert Redford narrates this documentary about the violent events that took place in 1975 on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Indian activists ended up in an extended standoff with FBI agents, and the result was several deaths, including two FBI agents whose killing was never clearly attributed to a specific gunman. Nevertheless, the government laid blame for the killing on Leonard Peltier, a Sioux political leader and activist with the American Indian Movement. Peltier has been in prison since 1977. The film details the brutal federal policies towards Indian people and the discrepancies in the government’s case against Peltier.
Other Links
Downtown Olympia mural honors Native American activist
Mural Unveiled in Honor of Leonard Peltier | Cooper Point
Chauncey Peltier – Mask Magazine
Let Leonard Peltier Paint – ICTMN.com
‘I’m Going to See Your Cop-Killing Dad Never Sees Freedom’
FBI interferes with exhibit of work by the renowned Native
Paintings by Leonard Peltier Hosted by The Olympia Food
Who is Leonard Peltier

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Lenny Foster on “Make No Bones About It. 2-7-2016, 4pm

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In May of 1972, a group of spiritual leaders involved in the American Indian Movement (AIM) went to Minnesota’s Stillwater prison to perform a traditional Native American Pipe Ceremony. For 23-year-old Lenny Foster, one of the youngest AIM participants, this powerful experience would set the direction for his life’s work. “It had a profound impact on me,” he says. “I could see the hope on [the prisoners’] faces. I felt so good that I could pray in my native tongue. That was fate. Destiny.” Recognizing the importance of traditional Native American religious practice as a source of strength and a necessary means of cultural preservation, Lenny has spent the last 28 years fighting to ensure that incarcerated Native Americans have the right to worship with access to their traditional ceremonies.

Lenny grew up in Fort Defiance, Arizona, with his mother and his father, a Navajo code talker during World War II. Lenny attended an Indian school as a day student and lived with his grandparents on a traditional Navajo sheep camp over the summers. “This traditional upbringing serves as a foundation of who I am today,” he says. “I’ve made it my calling to go to institutions where Native Americans are incarcerated and share it with those who didn’t have the opportunity to learn the traditions and to draw strength from their spiritual heritage.”

After trying out unsuccessfully for the Los Angeles Dodgers’ farm team, Lenny went to Arizona Western Junior College and then to Colorado State University. In college, he had his first exposure to the civil rights movement. “People were talking about riots in Detroit and Malcolm X and Martin Luther King,” Lenny says, “and I was wondering—where do I fit in?” Lenny joined the American Indian Movement.

In 1970, he was involved in the occupation of Alcatraz and, in 1972, in the Trail of Broken Treaties Caravan and the Bureau of Indian Affairs take-over in Washington, D.C. He took part in the 71-day protest at Wounded Knee in 1973. In 1978, he participated in the Longest Walk, a seven-month journey from Alcatraz to Washington, D.C., to protest proposed legislation that would eliminate the federal government’s fiduciary responsibilities to American Indian nations.

In 1981, as a graduate student in public administration, Lenny volunteered in the Arizona State prisons, where he constructed the first prison sweat lodge in the Southwest. Eventually he realized that his heart lay in this work, and he left his graduate program to pursue it full time. In 1983, the Navajo Nation tribal government began to support his efforts to provide spiritual counsel to incarcerated Native Americans. Today, as the Spiritual Advisor and Director of the Navajo Nations Corrections Project, he is responsible for the traditional spiritual guidance of 1500 inmates in 89 state and federal penitentiaries. “Many prison administrators don’t want Indian people to succeed. They are threatened by the return to spiritual beliefs and want to deny Indians the right to rehabilitate themselves through spirituality,” he says. He is troubled by the high rate of suicide among Native American prisoners, especially juveniles. “We’ve been made to feel ashamed—our long hair has been cut, our sweat lodges have been bulldozed, our eagle feathers have been broken—this results in so much pain and anger.”

Lenny draws strength from the growing support of the outside world for his cause. “I was overwhelmed to hear that Petra Shattuck, a German-American from the East Coast, was working for American Indian rights. I can say this much better in Dine,” he says, “but to be, through her life, drawn into a warrior society that believes in peace and dignity—for the red nations to join in this arena and share this solidarity means a great deal to me.”

Lenny has authored and co-authored legislation protecting the rights of incarcerated Native Americans in four states in the Southwest. He has testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs on several occasions. He has been a board member of the International Indian Treaty Council since 1992. In January, 1998, Lenny’s testimony on the overlooked rights of American Indian prisoners was accepted by the United Nations Human Rights Commission. Later that same month, the Association of State Correctional Administrators accepted his proposal to develop standards for American Indian religious freedom within all correctional facilities.

A member of the Grand Council of AIM since 1992, a member of the Native American Church and an active Sundancer, Lenny is active in the protest of the forced relocation of the Dine people in Big Mountain, Arizona.

Lenny Foster is concerned that today’s American Indian youth are less exposed to the traditions that gave him strength. “The responsibility we have as Indian people to teach our children and youths is great—alcoholism, drugs, broken homes are everywhere—you don’t have the role models my generation had.” By offering those most in need of support the kind of spiritual guidance he had as a boy, Lenny Foster shoulders his responsibility to pass on tradition and, in so doing, to pass on strength.

http://www.petrafoundation.org/fellows/lenny-foster/

Jimbo Simmons and Chauncey Peltier on Make No Bones About It. Dec 27th, 2015 at 5pm

Jimbo Simmons

Jimbo Simmons

WILLIAM “JIMBO” SIMMONS
Human Rights Leader, American Indian Movement

Jimbo Simmons is a member of the Choctaw nation and of the Leadership Council of the American Indian Movement West (AIM-WEST), which resists colonization, respects traditional knowledge and self-determination, and raises awareness on issues that concern Indians of the Americas, from racism to protection of sacred sites, the rights of the child, treaties, political prisoners, police brutality, immigration and militarization, climate change and the United Nations General Assembly “Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. He is in solidarity with Palestinians and all indigenous peoples that are subjected to expulsion and ethnic cleansing.

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Chauncey Peltier

Chauncey Peltier, son of Leonard Peltier, the Native American who was convicted of killing two FBI agents in 1975 and sentenced to two consecutive terms of life imprisonment, is now taking care of all the paintings his dad makes in prison. Benjamin Brink/Staff

Free Leonard Peltier!

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A shout out to Olympia, WA: You’re invited to the unveiling of a new mural in honor of Leonard Peltier, Monday, 12 October, noon-3:00 p.m. 421 4th East. See you there!

Ira Coyne, Chauncey Peltier share about the Mural dedicated to Leonard Peltier October 11th, 2015 at 5pm

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A local sign painter and muralist in Olympia, Ira Coyne, heard Chauncey interviewed by Raven Redbone on his show Make No Bones About it on KAOS radio. When Ira learned Leonard was a painter, he looked up his work and was taken by the pink lion depicted in Stalking. He then reached out to Raven and Chauncey to turn this piece into a mural at our city’s artesian well. Chauncey is now in Olympia for the week to work on the mural with Ira and anyone else who shows up at the well to lend a hand. (The official ribbon cutting for the mural will coincide with Olympia’s Inaugural Indigenous Peoples Day, this Monday October 12, at 12:00 pm by Olympia’s Artesian Well.)

Mask Magazine Article

Who is Leonard Peltier?

Chauncey Peltier on Make No Bones About It. Sepember 20th ,2015 at 4pm

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Chauncey Peltier is Leonard Peltier’s son and a Board member of the International Leonard Peltier Defense Committee. He was only 10 years old at the time of his father arrest. This one singular event was extremely devastating for Chauncey, it left him without a father forcing him to care for himself and his family. Chauncey has been involved in his father’s struggle for freedom all of his adult life and is the Director of Art for the ILPDC. If interested in displaying Leonard Peltier’s art in your local area, want to purchase an original oil painting or print or wish more details on Leonard’s art please contact Chauncey at clpeltierartgallery@gmail.com