Tom Keefe visits with Raven on Make No Bones About It. May 21, 2017 at 5pm

About Tom Keefe

Tom Keefe’s experience as legislative director for U.S. Sen. Warren Magnuson (D-WA) and later work for Senator Brock Adams (D-WA) gave him a unique perspective on the tragic collision of governmental, commercial, sport and industrial and tribal interests along the Columbia River that led to David Sohappy’s federal court prosecution.

Currently legal counsel for Kauffman & Associates, Inc. in Spokane, Keefe has extensive experience in litigation involving federal Indian treaty rights in federal, state and tribal courts. He also served as an appellate judge for the Northwest Intertribal Court System.

 

Help plan for Indigenous Peoples Day 2017. 

Saturday at 1 PM – 3 PM

5 days from now · 48–73° Partly Cloudy

Evergreen State Longhouse Cedar Room

2700 evergreen parkway nw Olympia, WA, Olympia, Washington 98505

Keith Secola on Make No Bones About It. June 4th, 2017 at 4pm


“The Human race, is the face of all people, different tongues,one heart.”–Keith Secola
 

Native folk & blues rocker Keith Secola is an accomplished artist: award-winning musician, guitarist and native flute player; singer, songwriter, and producer. His music is familiar to thousands of fans across North America and Europe. Keith’s famous song,”NDN KARS” is considered the contemporary Native American anthem and is the most requested song on Native radio in the US and Canada. Keith Secola is Anishinabe (Ojibwa) originally from the Mesabi Iron Range country of northern Minnesota, now residing in Arizona. He is a member of the Anishinabe Nation of northern Minnesota and southern Ontario,Canada.
Keith Secola is a seven-time Native American Music Award winner, receiving numerous Nammy nominations in various categories.
Winner: Artist of the Year, Best Producer, Best Folk/Country Recording, Best Blues/Jazz Recording, Best Independent Recording, Best Linguistic Recording, Best Instrumental Recording
Nominations for: Songwriter of the Year, Record of the Year, Song/Single of the Year, Best Historical Recording. 
In 2011, Keith Secola was inducted into the Native American Music Awards Hall of Fame, joining Jimmy Hendrix, Hank Williams, Crystal Gayle, Richie Valens among other inductees.

More about Keith Secola

Raven visits with Joanne Shenandoah on Make No Bones About It. May 14, 2017 at 4pm

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Today May 14th, 2017 at 4pm we will be blessed up with a visit from Joanne Shenandoah❤️ so looking forward to our time with her. Listen live at www.kaosradio.org

Wovoka Trudell, shares about his Art on Make No Bones About It. April 23, 2017, 4pm.

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Raven will be visiting with Wovoka Trudell about his amazing art work. Join us as we find out  more about Wovoka, his art, what inspirations him, and other forms of art that he does. Check him out on facebook. The link below.

Wovoka Trudell Art

Pat Vegas of Redbone, on Make No Bones About It. April 23rd, 2017 5pm

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Pat Vegas

One of the co-founder of the band

With his brother Lolly, he is also the co-founder of the band in 1969 after they had a almost ten year long successfull career in Los Angeles under the name of Pat & Lolly Vegas.

Pat Vegas

Born in 1941, Pat was the main composer, singer of the band. He is also an amazing bass player with a very unique style, very rythmic and profound sense of rythm and energy

Pat is the one who kept the flame alive through the years and is still playing with the band with new musicians

Pat and Redbone were honored during the Native American Music Awards 2008.
Pat was inducted into the Hall Of Fame with special honors at Seneca Niagara Casino, Niagara Falls, New York.

Pat with his bass guitar
Pat live
Pat live in 2013

Official page of REDBONE 

Chief Phil Lane Jr, Lakota Nation, on Make No Bones About It. April 16th, 2017 5-6 pm

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Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First Nations and is an internationally recognized leader in human and community development. He was born at the Haskell Indian School in Lawrence, Kansas in 1944, where his mother and father met and attended school.

During the past 45 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North, Central and South America, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Education at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada (1980-1996). With Elder’s from across North America Phil co-founded the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) in 1982. FWII became an independent Institute in 1995. As well, Phil is a Director of the Four Directions Corporation, an Indigenous owned company, incorporated in 1996’ as Four World’s economic development arm.

With Phil’s guidance and applied experience, FWII has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development. Four Directions’ is the Institute’s economic development arm. It is dedicated to the development of sustainable economic enterprises that support holistic, political, social, cultural, environmental, and educational development.

In 1977, Phil was named a Modern Indian Sports Great by the National Indian Magazine, Wassaja, for his record-breaking accomplishments in Track and Wrestling. He has extensive experience in his own cultural traditions, is an award winning author and film producer and holds Master’s Degrees in Education and Public Administration. His film credits include the National Public Television series “Images of Indians” with the late Will Sampson, “Walking With Grandfather”, “The Honor of All: The Story of Alkali Lake” and “Healing the Hurts” and “Shift of the Ages (SOTA)” released in December, 2012. In January, 2013 SOTA won the Jury Prize for Best Documentary at the World Interfaith Harmony Film Festival, in April, 2013 SOTA won the Audience Choice for Best Documentary at the Riverside International Film Festival and was the Official Selection at the Sedona International Film Festival in February, 2013 and the Black Hills International Film Festival in May, 2013.

In August, 1992, Phil was the first Indigenous person to win the prestigious Windstar Award, presented annually by the late John Denver and the Windstar Foundation to a global citizen whose personal and professional life exemplifies commitment to a global perspective, operates with awareness of the spiritual dimension of human existence and demonstrates concrete actions of the benefit for humans and all living systems of the Earth. At this International event, in recognition of his lineage and long time service to Indigenous peoples and the human family, Indigenous Elders from across North America recognized Phil as a Hereditary Chief through a Traditional Headdress Ceremony.

On November 11, 2000, Phil received the Year 2000 award from the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights in Berne, Switzerland. Phil is the first North or South American person to receive the award. This award was given in recognition of Phil’s “unique contributions to improve the lives and future hopes of Indigenous populations. It is primarily based on his most special merits of promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity rather than opposing oppression directly and, as well, for his international visionary initiatives among Indigenous populations by healing the root causes of hopelessness and despair.”

Other winners of these prestigious awards include, Oceanologist Jacques-Yves Cousteau, David Brower, Yevgeni Velikhov, Vice President of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Winner and founder of Kenya’s Greenbelt Movement, Lester Brown, President of the World Watch Institute, the Dalai Lama of Tibet, Dr. Boutros Boutros Ghali, former Secretary General of the United Nations, and British Lord Yehudi Menuhin, musician and philosopher.

On June 21, 2008, Phil was awarded the 14th Annual Ally Award by the Center for Healing Racism in Houston, Texas. The Ally Award is an annual award presented by the Houston-based Center for the Healing of Racism to honor the achievements of those who have worked hard to achieve harmony of all ethnic and cultural groups. Phil received the Ally Award for his national and international work in promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity that focuses on healing the root causes of racism and oppression rather than focusing on conflict. Special emphasis on this award is for Lane’s dedicated work, for more than nineteen years, as one of the primary leaders in the resolution of Canada’s Residential School issue, which involved the sexual, physical, cultural, psychological, and emotional abuse of thousands of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada.

This effort resulted in a $3.5 Billion settlement for Residential School survivors, a full public apology by the Prime Minister of Canada and all Political Party Leaders on the floor of the Canadian Parliament, the establishment of a $500 million Aboriginal Healing Foundation and a formal, five year, Truth and Reconciliation Commission that is currently holding public hearings across Canada on the impact of the Residential Schools on the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada.

In 2008, Phil completed a three-year tenure as CEO of the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF) in Seattle, Washington. The Foundation’s achievements include the launching of the first-ever Native American Film Festival, the development of a host of innovative education programs ranging from elementary and high school curriculum design and development, to adult education, early childhood education, and the recent launching of a $3.5 million holistic poverty-alleviation program model for urban Indigenous Peoples in Seattle.

Phil has now stepped into further global leadership as Chairman of the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) and Four Directions International. The Institute’s central initiative since 2009 is the promotion of Deep Social Networks and The Digital Fourth Way. The focus of The Fourth Way is contributing to the unification of the Human Family by co-creating community-based, culturally-respectful, principal-centered strategies and programming that transcends assimilation, resignation, and conflict. This work uses digital communications technologies for local, regional and large scale change by collectively addressing related challenges such as the Alberta Tars Sands and other issues impacting the health and well-being of the Human Family, Mother Earth and the future of our younger generations.

Deep Social Networks (DSN) are principle-centered, collaboratively created and community-based digital networks with purpose for uplifting education, harmonious development, child protection, social and environmental justice, such as the Alberta Tar Sands and unifying Indigenous Peoples and marginalized, underserved communities in the Americas in harmony with the Reunion of the Condor and Eagle.

On June 9, 2013 the Four Worlds Foundation has been officially opened at the City of Knowledge located at the former Clayton Military Base in the Panama Canal Zone, Panama. The Four Worlds Foundation in Panama will be the International Training Center and Digital DSN Hub for actualizing the Reunion of the Condor and Eagle via the Fourth Way across the Americas and beyond!

More on Phil Lane Jr.