Tag Archives: Native Woman

Raye Zaragoza on Make No Bones About It. May 19th, 2019 5pm

Raye Zaragoza is an award-winning singer-songwriter who carries an acoustic guitar and a message. Her quiet yet powerful song “In the River,” written in response to the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux reservation in North Dakota, resonated strongly with listeners and went viral in late 2016, garnering half a million views on the video, national media coverage, and a Global Music Award and Honesty Oscar. 

 

Raye’s debut album, Fight For You (independent, 2017), displays her compassion, dedication to justice and equality for all, and keen eye for the seemingly small daily moments that become our most meaningful memories. About the record, Raye says, “This album is about finding yourself and finding your voice. It’s about maturing and realizing that you can make a difference if you so choose.” 

 

Writing about social issues comes naturally to Raye. “As a woman of color in America, social issues are things you deal with and see every day of your life,” she says. “I write about my experience and oftentimes my existence has been laced with injustice.”

 

Raye performs her music all over the United States as well as across Europe, where she spent five weeks touring in summer 2017. Her music has been featured on Billboard and Democracy Now! and on numerous lists of the best modern-day protest songs, including those by Paste Magazine, What Culture, and Overblown. She has also performed live sessions for Paste, Daytrotter, and FNX. 

 

At SXSW 2018, Raye spoke about her loyal fanbase and maintaining an independent career on a panel entitled “Serving the Sacred Bond” hosted by PledgeMusic. This summer, she joined Dispatch and Nahko and Medicine for the People on their Summer Tour, which included dates at Red Rocks and two nights at Central Park Summerstage. 

https://www.rayezaragoza.com

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Mallory Black of StrongHearts Native Helpline on Make No Bones About It. May 5th, 2019 4pm

Mallory Black (Navajo) is the Communications Manager for the StrongHearts Native Helpline and an award-winning freelance journalist. As a writer, Mallory has specialized in covering Native American communities and their unique intersections with education, health, and the environment. Originally from Salt Lake City, Utah, she has reported from Chicago, San Diego and Washington, D.C. She currently resides in Austin, TX.

After earning a master’s degree in journalism from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University, she completed an internship with the news desk at WBEZ Chicago Public Radio, the city’s National Public Radio affiliate. Mallory previously served as the Communication Specialist for the Division of Student Affairs at San Diego State University.

Mallory holds a bachelor’s degree in communication with emphasis in public relations and a minor degree in peace and justice studies from Utah Valley University (UVU), where she served as the News Editor of the university’s newspaper, the UVU Review. During her time at UVU, Mallory studied abroad in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, to research communications, development and humanitarian response with several nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and representatives of United Nations agencies. She also served as a communications intern at the Salt Lake County Division of Youth Services.

https://mblack47portfolio.wordpress.com/

Donell Barlow on “Make No Bones About It.” April 28, 2019 4pm Pacific

Donell Barlow is Yurok and an enrolled member of the Ottawa tribe, Otter clan. She currently resides in Spokane, WA working with Native youth, families, and communities as a certified Holistic Health Coach and Yoga teacher. Donell received her certification as a Holistic Health Coach six years ago from the Institute of Integrative Nutrition. Her deep passion for working with the Native Youth utilizing traditional foods as medicine has been at the forefront for most of her work. Donell released “Medicine Tracks-A Memoir” in 2018, and is in the layout process of her children’s book “Bigfoot and Lightening Bug” to be released this summer. Donell enjoys offering a wide variety of skill-sets to her participants through seminars, webinars, and workshops.

http://donellbarlow.com/

Sharing Sami Culture on “Make No Bones About It.” April 21, 2019 4-6pm Pacific

Radio Event

Tune into KAOS 89.3 FM Olympia this Sunday April 21, 2019 from 4-6pm PST for the show, Make No Bones About It. Raven Redbone will be hosting Pacific Sámi Searvi President (Julie Whitehorn), Astri Dankertsen (Sámi professor from Bodø, Norway), and myself!

We will be discussing Sámi history, culture, and politics, as well as playing contemporary music representing the languages of Northern

Sámi, Lule Sámi, Skolt Sámi, Inari Sámi, Ume Sámi, and Kildin Sámi. Skolt, Inari, Ume, and Kildin are critically endangered languages, and this music has never been broadcasted in the U.S.

We will be sharing unpublished poems from Sámi multi-artist and activist, Niillas Holmberg. We will also be interviewing Sámi politician and activist, Beaska Niillas live on air.

For those of you who are out of range you can stream the show live here:

https://www.kaosradio.org/listen

Post recorded archives can be found here:

https://www.radiofreeamerica.com/schedule/kaos

Tonight January 13, 2019

Tonight we dedicate our show to Chairman David Lopeman. Rest in Power!

Tonight 4-4:30pm Pacific we will visit with to Unist’ot’ en Clan member Karla Tait, learn about the violence against Wet’suwet’en people, and how it fits into the big picture of colonialism in Canada.

Than from 5-6pm we will be visiting with Bridget Ray and Earth Sovereign about the up coming MMIW Marches in Olympia and Seattle.

“Make No Bones About It.” Sunday’s 4-6pm

Image by Dennis Walsh

Pualani Case on” Make No Bones About It.” September 9th, 2018 4pm

Pualani Case, born and raised  on the Island of Hawai’i surrounded by the high mountains of Mauna Kea, Mauna Loa, Hualalai and Kohala, the fresh waters of Kohakohau and Waikoloa and the plains of Waimea. Pua’s life path and purpose has led her to become a Kumu Hula, a teacher of traditional dance and chant, and  a teacher of the ways, culture and traditions of the kanaka maoli or native peoples of Hawai’i. With a degree in Hawaiian Language and culture, and a teaching degree in Social Studies, interwoven with the traditional teachings, philosophies and expectations from her kupuna or elders, Pua has integrated ‘Ike Hawai’i or Hawaiian knowledge and lessons into the public school system for over 30 years.

Pua and her ‘ohana, her family are active as spiritual and cultural leaders in and beyond their community. They are an integral part of  the protocol and ceremonies for Na Kalaiwa’a, Moku o Keawe Makali’i Voyaging Canoe, as well as for Hokule’a and other Pacific Island Voyages. Pua sits on various educational and cultural boards including the Waimea Hawaiian Civic Club, Waimea Community Education Hui, and MKEA, Mauna Kea Education and Awareness. Pua and her family are petitioners in the Contested Case hearing filed on behalf of Mauna Kea Mountain. As a representative of the Mauna Kea ‘Ohana Na Kia’I Mauna, Idle No More Hawai’i Warriors Rising and Idle No More Mauna, Kea she and her family have traveled throughout the continent, to Europe and various places across the Pacific to network, support and address the issues and challenges facing sacred places and life ways of the people of HawaiʻI and beyond Hawaii. In the past two years, Pua has represented the Mauna Kea Movement in  Aotearoa as a keynote speaker at the He Manawa Whenua Conference at Waikato, and in California in support of the Winnemem Wintuʻs efforts to bring back the salmon to the McCloud. She has stood on the frontlines in North Dakota at Standing Rock and Sacred Stone Camps with fellow Mauna Kea Protectors in support of the Native Americans stance on keeping pipelines out of their rivers. In October, Pua was featured at Indigenous Day Celebrations in New York City and was a guest speaker at the University of New York on Movements and Alliance Building between Native Peoples. This work is a one of commitment, dedication, passion and a mission to weave the relationships and strengthen the alliances with peoples everywhere for the highest good for the earth.

Tara Trudell on Make No Bones About It. September 9th, 2018 5pm

Tara Evonne is an artist who is passionate about combining poetry and film to create a visual art form of her own. Her art focuses on being socially aware and conscious of the injustices that plague our society. Social conscious is a top priority as a she rediscovers her own word in a world that only attempts to silence the Indigenous spirit. Her goal is to illuminate the Indigenous spirit through performance art. She is of Mexican, Spanish, and Santee Sioux descent and cultivates a vision which includes representation of her ancestors and earth. She is a student of the Media Arts with a concentration in Film and Audio.

TARA EVONNE TRUDELL

POET • VISUAL ARTIST • PHOTOGRAPHER

TARA EVONNE TRUDELL

ARTIST’S STATEMENT

As a multimedia artist, I weave poetry, photography, film, and audio components into my work in order to express creative visions that address social issues. It is vital my role as an artist that I represent and advocate for earth and humanity in an effort to stimulate action. As a photographer, I approach photography with a humanistic sensibility in order to discuss and address important social issues especially dealing with the border between the USA and Mexico.

I write poetry to address these troubling issues and to bring a vocal element to my views. I then roll the poem into paper beads, which allows me to transfer the words on paper into energy and action.

Each bead becomes a prayer to honor the word and the subject of the poem. This process provides me an opportunity to connect with my purpose as an artist and to further the changes that I hope will take place in the world.

Tara Trudell