Tag Archives: Raven Redbone

Madonna Thunder Hawk today at 4pm on “Make No Bones About It.”

Madonna Thunder Hawk co-founded Women of All Red Nations (WARN) in 1978, organizing a health study of the drinking water on the Pine Ridge reservation. (WARN found the water to be highly radioactive, which led to the establishment of rural water supply system.) Thunder Hawk also helped organize the Black Hills Protection Committee (later the He Sapa Institute) whose goal is to protect the many sacred sites within the region’s treaty lands.

Madonna Thunder Hawk is a member of the Oohenumpa band of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Her life’s work has been guided by the goals of winning justice for Native Americans. Madonna is the embodiment of courage. She was an original member of the American Indian Movement, a co-founder of Women of All Red Nations (WARN), and is currently the Lakota People’s Law Project’s principal organizer and Tribal Liaison. Madonna has been featured in several documentary films including the recent PBS series We Shall Remain. She is a grandmother, both literally and figuratively, to a generation of Native American activists. Through her work, Madonna builds alliances and support for Child Welfare among South Dakota’s tribal leaders and communities.

She is a veteran of every modern Native American struggle, including the 1969 to 1971 occupation of Alcatraz to the 1973 siege at Wounded Knee. Hailing from the Feather Necklace Tiospaye, which extends across the Lakota reservations of South Dakota, Thunder Hawk is also a long-time community organizer with a range of experience in American Indian rights protection, cultural preservation, economic development, environmental justice and Lakota social reclamation.

Born and raised on a number of South Dakota reservations, she first became active in the late 1960s as a member and leader in the American Indian Movement (AIM). In addition to involvement in the national and international arena for Native sovereignty, she anchored much of her organizing at the community level. While on the federal relocation program in San Francisco she joined the occupation of Alcatraz and has since been forever consumed by the indigenous struggle for self-determination. Once drawn into activism, Thunder Hawk has been a voice of resistance ever since.

She established the “We Will Remember Survival School” for Indian youth whose parents were facing federal charges or who had been drop-outs or “push-outs” from the educational system. This alternative home/school was part of the National Federation of Native-Controlled Survival Schools that was established during the movement as many alternative schools developed. Thunder Hawk was a co-founder and spokesperson for the Black Hills Alliance, which blocked Union Carbide from mining uranium on sacred Lakota land.

An eloquent voice for Native America, Thunder Hawk has spoken throughout the United States, Central America, Europe, and the Middle East. She was an International Indian Treaty Council delegate to the United Nations Human Rights Commission in Geneva. She also was a delegate to the U.N. Decade of Women Conference in Mexico City and in 2001 to the World Conference against Racism in Durban, South Africa.

Advertisements

Sarah Sense Wilson on “Make No Bones About It.” on July 1, 2018 4pm

Sarah Sense Wilson, LMHC, CDP, WSGCC-II, Chair of Urban Native Education Alliance

Sarah Sense-Wilson (Oglala) serves as the elected Chair for the Urban Native Education Alliance (UNEA). Sarah is committed to strengthening our urban Native community through tireless advocacy, organizing, and networking both within the Native community and greater King County area. Central to Sarah’s values is student voice, “As an organization we need to be cognizant of its purpose at all times, we are here to serve the academic, social, emotional, cultural, and spiritual needs of our Native children”. Collaborating, consulting and sharing in decision making with students supports our emphasis on being student centered.

Sarah’s educational background includes a B.A. in Political Science, UW 1999, Chemical Dependency License 2004, and she completed her MA degree in Applied Psychology from Antioch University in 2010. Sarah is a Washington State licensed Mental Health Counselor, and a certified Problem Gambling Counselor. She has worked in the chemical dependency field for over 15 years, specializing in both family and couples counseling. Sarah is currently employed at Tulalip Tribes Behavioral Wellness as a Problem Gambling Coordinator.

Sarah and her partner Mark have one daughter who recently graduated from Western Washington University. Sarah enjoys her multiple volunteer roles and is highly motivated to improve academic and cultural enrichment experiences for our urban Native youth. Sarah believes both cultural knowledge and education are vital to strengthening and building the future for our urban Native community.

Brian Yazzie (Yazzie the Chef) on “Make No Bones About It.” – June 17th, 2018 4pm

Brian Yazzie (Yazzie the Chef) is a Diné  from Dennehotso, Arizona which is located on the Notheastern part of the Navajo Nation. Yazzie has a degree in Applied Science (AAS) in Culinary Arts from Saint Paul College. He focuses on bringing together hyper-local and regional indigenous ingredients to help revitalize a healthy indigenous cuisine. He brings creativity to ancestral knowledge through modern techniques. Yazzie the Chef is available for private dinners, chef demos & collaborations, as well as educational demonstrations.  He also currently serves as the Chef de Cuisine at The Sioux Chef in Minneapolis, MN and a team member on I-Collective.

Website:

www.yazziethechef.com

YouTube promo video:

https://youtu.be/Id-BmWcW2Sg

Ernesto “Neto” Burbank on “Make No Bones About It.” June 3rd, 2018 at 4pm

Ernesto “Neto” Burbank

Diné/Navajo

Chinle Az

Tattoo Artist at Empire Tattoo Tucson Az

Naabaahii – protector of the people

Honor Life Tattoo Tour

HonorXLife Clothing

Stacey Speedis on “Make No Bones About It.” June 3rd, 2018 5pm

AYE

Ink Nash Wanikshaash( my name is), Sayyepum Ah-toot-wy Stacey Speedis. I am a 43 year young Native woman who has raised 2 children; who are now young teenagers. I am from Toppenish, Washington. I have been an Artist all my life; had to switch from my right- hand to my left- hand at the age of 17 due to a horse- wreck I was in in 1992 that left me with a whole right- side paralysis. I just did not want to let my artistic side die, even tho I had a coma to come out of that lasted 9 days. I come from the Horse Family of these parts here in the Lower Yakama Valley. There are many types of Artwork I do: draw, paint in oil, water color and acrylic, sculpt and write. Plus, my auntie’s have taught me more about how to make moccasins, dresses an skirts and ribbon shirts. We are a very traditional family who were raised going to Longhouse. We go for a lot of different kind of ceremonies. We are food gatherers for our people.

What, or how I do Art… it will depend on how I am feelin’; I just sit down n draw whatever my heart feels like n take my anger out on the pencil, on however I am feelin’. I am also an Author who has 2 books published thru  Authorhouse; Bibliographies.

If you would like to know more, just ask me,

Payu Kwaxla(thank you),

Sayyepum Ah-toot-wy Stacey Speedis

SASSpeedis

‘18

Hugo Lucitante on “Make No Bones About It.” June 10th, 2018 5pm

Hugo Lucitante is a member of the Cofán people of Ecuadoran Amazonia. He is currently concentrating in Ethnic Studies and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at Brown University. His work focuses on historical research on the Cofán people with interest in Indigenous Studies and environmental and sustainable development. Through Brown initiatives, he has helped develop the Cofán Heritage Project. He works closely with the Linguistics Department for a Cofán language documentation project, and with the Cofán-Brown Student Alliance Club. In addition to his school activities, Hugo currently works as a liaison for his people and the community of Zábalo, both as an Eco-tour guide and as a sitting board member for the Cofán Survival Foundation and Fundación Raíz.

Solana Booth on “Make No Bones About It” April 29, 2018 4-6 pm

“Solana promotes Native American and Alaska Native traditional teachings using her own healing modalities, one is positive interconnectedness model. Solana is enrolled into the Nooksack Nation of the Chief Dan George Family and Mohawk from Bay Quinte, White Owl House of the Wolf Clan. Her Paternal association is Tsymsyan of the Violet Booth Family, Raven Clan. She is a mother of four and Grandmother of a baby girl. Her children are also members of the Tlingit, Haida, Pawnee, Lakota and Dakota Nations. Solana’s first degree was in Early Childhood Special Education; naturally she then studied perinatal, prenatal, post- natal and historical trauma(s) with certifications next. Solana is an Advocate of Sacred Storyteacher. Her work includes: Health and Human Services work for local IHS Providers, Solana also consults by providing technical assistance, training/teaching adult learners of equity practices, traditional and contemporary storytelling, Innovative Technology Program writing, Documentary film making, teaches art, and creating community gardens in local food deserts and speaking to First Foods. She currently serves in a Leadership role in The Russel Family Foundation’s Puyallup Watershed Initiative’s Board of Directors, and is a Just and Healthy Food System Community of Interest Equity Team member while finishing her Documentary, “Native American and Alaska Native Birth Stories” and enrolled in an Intensive Historical Trauma Masters Certification: where she’ll soon be a practicing Somatic Archeologist and Brain-spotting.

NAAN Birth Stories

Please see:

http://i-voices.org/

www.advocatesofsacred.com