Tag Archives: First Nations

Adrian Sutherland of Midnight Shine on Make No Bones About It. May 19, 2019 4-5 pm

ADRIAN SUTHERLAND:

“One foot in the past, one in the here and now…”

— Lyrics from Northern Man by Midnight Shine

 

Adrian Sutherland is from the Mushkegowuk Cree community of Attawapiskat, situated on the coast of the James Bay in Northern Ontario. He’s a singer/songwriter and frontman for roots/rock band Midnight Shine, making ‘radio-friendly’ music that draws upon his personal experiences, while reflecting universal themes like family, home, love and loss. In addition to making contemporary music, Sutherland – who is fluent in Cree – is a traditional knowledge keeper. He teaches his children to hunt, fish, and survive on the land. He participates in spring and fall harvests, takes part in ceremonies, sings pow wow, and is a genuine example of someone who lives authentically. He is a father, grandfather, and hard-working husband, proud of who he is, and where he comes from. Setting Midnight Shine apart from other bands is the depth of Adrian’s exploration of his First Nations’ identity, values, and life in the North. Midnight Shine caught the attention of Ralph James from Toronto (APA Agency), one of Canada’s most renowned and respected booking agents. Ralph has since become Midnight Shine’s biggest industry champion, helping take their career to the next level. Adrian cares deeply about First Nations’ issues and his people of the North. He worked as a paramedic for many years, providing emergency response services all over Northern Ontario. He spent three years as Chief Executive Officer for Economic Development in Attawapiskat – a position he left in March to make more time for his music career, cultural obligations, and growing family.

 

A graduate of Northern College in Timmins, Adrian completed Business Management in 2014 with studies in accounting, human resource management, marketing, communications, and community relations. Prior to, he pursued the education and certification to become an Emergency Medical Technician. Adrian was nominated for a 2016 Premier’s Award from Colleges Ontario for the work he does in his community and his commitment to the North. Adrian believes in being a healthy role model for the next generation – through music, arts, and sports. He was thrilled to play hockey alongside other musicians and former NHL greats at the 2017 JUNO Cup in Ottawa. He is passionate about facilitating sessions for youth, ensuring that young people have access to education, opportunities, and cultural land-based learning. He was instrumental in bringing Toronto-based ArtsCan Circle to Attawapiskat, and gets great satisfaction from helping kids discover their talents. While Adrian’s home has been the subject of much negative media attention, he would like to change those perceptions through the work he is doing with Midnight Shine: “There are good stories to be told from Attawapiskat, and from all over the North. I hope we’re one of them.”

https://midnightshineonline.com/

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Tonight January 13, 2019

Tonight we dedicate our show to Chairman David Lopeman. Rest in Power!

Tonight 4-4:30pm Pacific we will visit with to Unist’ot’ en Clan member Karla Tait, learn about the violence against Wet’suwet’en people, and how it fits into the big picture of colonialism in Canada.

Than from 5-6pm we will be visiting with Bridget Ray and Earth Sovereign about the up coming MMIW Marches in Olympia and Seattle.

“Make No Bones About It.” Sunday’s 4-6pm

Image by Dennis Walsh

Support-Name Change to Billy Frank Jr. Way


Hi Relatives 

Been working on this for sometime now with the City of Olympia. The port says it needs to hear from you! Call and sign this petition. I so appreciate your help! 

Raven Redbone

Support-Name Change to Billy Frank Jr. Way

Goodthinking shares with Raven Redbone on KAOS 89.3 fm, April 26th, 2015 at 5:30

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Goodthinking 4 All Our Relations is a registered 501(c)3 nonprofit organized in July 2009, to address and meet the needs of the seemingly forgotten and overlooked children and Elders in “Indian Country.” Goodthinking 4 All Our Relations operates under the jurisdiction of a covenant with Creation. Through the Traditional Ceremonies, Teachings, and Guidance of our Elders, we understand it is time to make a difference. In order to systemically address issues of suicide, substance abuse, health disparities, and domestic violence, we must first address basic physiological needs for water, food, and safety. When people are fighting merely to survive there is not time for them to think of ways in which to thrive.

More Info click here 

Good Shield Aguilar / 7th Generation Rise, on KAOS 89.3 fm, April 12, 2015 at 4pm

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GoodShield Aguilar is of Oglala lakota and Pasqua Yaqui origin. he has been a visual artist as long as he can remember, but discovered music as a teenager and he has made music and art a grounding point from which cultural identity could be expressed and environmental causes could be addressed, particularly with the yellowstone Buffalo (www.buffalofieldcampaign.org). Aside from playing as a solo acoustic artist, beating a driving bass drum while strumming a guitar and singing original song with native “chants” and spoken word, he can also be seen around the country (and recently, across the great pond) with drummer, Johnnie Martinez and flautist, Mignon Geli. In this instrumental arrangement, they can range from Funk, Rock, Reggae, Latin Soul and anywhere in between the 7 generations….

 

 

Alan Parker, a Citizen of the Chippewa Cree Tribal Nation, on “Make No Bones About It.” 3-15-2015, 5pm

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Alan Parker, a Citizen of the Chippewa Cree Tribal Nation, serves as Adjunct Faculty for Tribal Students enrolled in the Indigenous Development and Advancement PhD program at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

Alan Parker served as Staff Director, Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Washington, DC, where was appointed by Senator Daniel K Inouye, Chairman of the Committee. His responsibilities as Staff Director included the development of a comprehensive legislative program for the Committee. Major legislative initiatives of the Committee during this time included the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, the National Museum of American Indian Act, the Indian Self-Governance Act, the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act and the Indian Housing Act. In the 1980’s, Alan served as President, The American Indian National Bank, Washington, DC. The AINB was the only National Bank in the US owned and operated by Indian Tribes. Established in 1974, the Tribal Shareholders engaged in commercial banking serving a market of Tribal Business enterprises. Prior to this, he was appointed by Sen. James Abourezk and served as Chief Counsel, Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Washington, DC, from April 1977 until July 1980. The Select Committee was created to serve as the first independent legislative Committee within the US Congress with responsibility for all legislative proposals dealing with Native American issues and concerns. They also exercised congressional oversight authority over federal agencies and offices charged with US Trust Responsibilities and public services for the 350 Indian Tribal and Alaska Native communities located in the US. Major legislative activities conducted under Parker’s term in this office included The Indian Child Welfare Act, The American Indian Religious Freedom Act, and Tribal Colleges authorizing Authority as well as historical Indian Land and Water Rights Legislative Settlements.

Education Achievements: Parker attended UCLA School of Law, Los Angeles, California, where he received a Juris Doctor degree in June 1972. Parker’s work researching Tribal and State Court Relationships led to publication of his work in the University of Montana Law Review

Military Service: In June 1965 Parker was drafted into the US Army and was sent to Officer Candidate School where he received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Signal Corps and served until August 1968 when he was honorably discharged. Prior to being discharged he was awarded a Bronze Star medal for meritorious service under combat conditions in the Republic of South Vietnam.

Roy Henry Vickers on the next “Make No Bones About It.” 12-14-2014 at 4:30pm

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Canadian artist Roy Henry Vickers is best known around the world for his limited edition prints. He is also an accomplished carver, design advisor of prestigious public spaces, a sought-after keynote speaker, and publisher and author of several successful books.

In addition, he is a recognized leader in the First Nations community, and a tireless spokesperson for recovery from addictions and abuse.

Roy has received many awards and honours for his art and community involvement. Among them are a hereditary chieftainship and several hereditary names he has received from Northwest Coast First Nations.

In 1994, Maclean’s magazine included Roy as the first artist ever in its Annual Honour Roll of Extraordinary Canadian Achievers. In 1998, the Province of British Columbia appointed Roy to the prestigious Order of B.C. and in 2003, Roy received the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal. In 2003, a video featuring Roy was part of the successful Vancouver 2010 Olympic Bid.

In 1987, at the Commonwealth Summit in Vancouver, the original of Roy’s painting A Meeting of Chiefs was the official gift of the Province of British Columbia to Queen Elizabeth II. Limited edition prints of the painting were presented to the 48 Commonwealth Heads of State.

During their Vancouver Summit in 1993, former Soviet leader Boris Yeltsin and former U.S. president Bill Clinton received artist’s proofs of Roy’s print The Homecoming as the Province’s official gift.

roy candid bio picRoy’s work can be found in private and public collections and galleries around the world including the National Museum of Man (Ottawa, Ontario), University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology (Vancouver), the McMichael Canadian Art Collection (Kleinburg, Ontario) and the National Museum of Japan (Osaka).

Roy Henry Vickers was born in June 1946 in the village of Greenville, in northern British Columbia. Roy has stayed on the northwest coast of British Columbia ever since, residing at various times in Hazelton, Kitkatla, Tofino and Victoria.

Roy’s love and respect of the magnificent natural beauty of this area is clearly evident in his art. His boldly colourful sunsets, subdued misty rivers and peaceful winter scenes reflect the essence of the west coast of Canada.

Roy’s father was a fisherman with the blood of three northwest coast First Nations’ Tsimshian, Haida and Heiltsuk flowing in his veins. Roy’s mother was a schoolteacher whose parents had immigrated to Canada from England. This unusual mixed heritage has had a strong influence on Roy’s art.

Roy studied traditional First Nations art and design at the Gitanmaax School of Northwest Coast Indian Art in Hazelton.

Using these building blocks Roy, through hard work and intensive research, created his authentic and personal style of expression – a harmonious fusion of traditional and contemporary, old and new, personal and universal.

In many of his pieces, Roy uses superimposed ‘shadow images’ that add another layer of depth, history and myth to his clear, clean images. His signature Eagle Moon and various suns appear on many pieces as well.

The resulting art touches deeply and is accessible to people all over the world regardless of their background, age, beliefs or traditions.

Roy Henry Vickers Bio