Tag Archives: First Nations

Chief Beau Dick visits with Raven Redbone, 3-9-2014 at 4:30 pm

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Beau Dick

Kwakwaka’wakw

(1955- )

Beau Dick was born in Alert Bay on the Northern tip of Vancouver Island and was raised in the neighbouring Kwakwaka’wakw village of Kingcome Inlet. The isolation of the remote villages slowed down the processes of cultural destruction, which had devastated many other villages on the coast. Many of the Kwakwaka’wakw master artists, including Willie Seaweed, Charlie James, and Mungo Martin as well as Beau’s father Ben Dick and grandfather James Dick carried the art and culture through the period of cultural assimilation and transition to become among the first carvers to receive recognition as “name” artists beyond the cultural definition. They also carried the wealth of songs, dances, and ceremonial rites, which were passed on to the dedicated young artists such as Beau who was among the first artists of the modern era. Alert Bay remains a cultural centre as well as producing such noted artists as Wayne Alfred, Russell Smith, Bruce Alfred and Doug Cramner.

Beau’s first carving was a miniature totem pole based on the pole his father carved to commemorate the visit of King George XI. His father also carved the largest freestanding totem pole (173-feet) to commemorate Canada’s centennial in 1967.

Beau moved to Vancouver to complete high school. He became interested in painting and produced several large canvases in a naturalistic style representing Kwakwaka’wakw mythological figures and ceremonial dancers. He continued to carve and received several important commissions while still a young artist; he painted the dance screen for the Cape Mudge museum and was among the youngest artists chosen for the Legacy Exhibition.

The Legacy Exhibition (documented in the book The Legacy—Traditions and Innovation in Northwest Coast Indian Art by Peter Macnair) hosted by the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria (1972) was one of the first major exhibitions to focus on contemporary artists. The exhibition traveled until 1982. The exhibition and catalogue became a major resource for the growing collector base interested in contemporary Northwest Coast art. Beau exhibited two works, a Noohmahl (fool dancer) and a Tuxw’id or Kominicka mask both carved in the powerful tradition of the War Spirit Ceremony. These masks were instrumental in building the market for the more powerful and darker subjects of the Kwakwaka’wakw traditional ceremonies.

Beau is a prolific and respected artist. He was chosen to carve the large four way split transformation mask for the Canadian Pavilion at Expo ‘86 in Vancouver, British Columbia, now in the collection of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull, Quebec. He was also commissioned to carve a major eleven-figure pole by the City of Vancouver for Stanley Park.

©2001 Spirit Wrestler Gallery

Keith and Chenoa Egawa share about their new book “Tani’s Search for the Heart” on Make No Bones About It. 4:30 pm, 2-23-2014

Tani's Search

Keith and Chenoa Egawa are a brother and sister writing and illustrating team of Lummi and S’Klallam Indian ancestry. Keith is a novelist ( Madchild Running) with a background in education reform and social work. Chenoa is a singer, stoyterller and ceremonial leader, who has worked as a professional illustrator, international indigenous human rights advocate and educator.

Book Cover

Tani's Search_Page_1

Edmund Ciccarello, Diné (Navajo), on the next Make No Bones About It. 2-2-2014 at 5pm

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Edmund Ciccarello, Diné (Navajo), Roanhorse Canyon, New Mexico.

A family man with a loving wife and beautiful children and grandchildren. I treasure making life-long friends near and far. I pray that we strive to ensure our future generations have a wonderful beautiful safe world that they can also enjoy besides us.

“Global Changes, Indigenous Peoples and Prophecies !” with Phil Lane Jr. – on KAOS radio , 1-19-2014 at 5pm

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Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First Nations and is an internationally recognized leader inhuman and community development. During the past 44 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North, Central and SouthAmerica, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as Associate Professor and Founder and Chairman of the Four Worlds International Institute at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. …With Phil’s guidance and applie…d experience, Four Worlds has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development.Phil has extensive experience in his own cultural traditions, is an award winning author and film producer, and holds Master’s Degrees in Education and Public Administration. He received numerous international awards for his work, among which the Year 2000 award from the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights in Berne, Switzerland. Phil is the first North or South American person to receive the award, and he joins a select international group: the Dalai Lama of Tibet, Dr. Boutro Boutros Ghali, former Secretary General of the United Nations, and British Lord Yehudi Menuhin, musician and philosopher, have, also, received the award. The foundation says the award is in recognition of Phil’s “most special merits of promoting freedom and justice for indigenous people by building human and spiritual capacity rather than opposing oppression directly and also on his international visionary initiatives among Native populations by healing the root causes of hopelessness and despair.”

http://inclaritas.com/community/chief-phil-lane-jr/

Ravenspeaker on Make No Bones About It. December 22, 2013 at 5pm

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Ravenspeaker
Native Storytelling, Choreography and Cultural Events Planning

Who is Ravenspeaker?
Ravenspeaker is the stage name for Robert Frederiksen an Alaskan Tsimshian storyteller of the Raven Clan. He was born and raised in Seattle, Washington and has travelled all over North America as a recognized Culture Bearer for the Northwest Coast’s First Peoples.
Storytelling
He began by accident as a teenager when a group of dancers needed someone to fill time on stage between sets. Although considered very young at the time he proved worthy of the honor by crafting a spell binding version of the Culture’s most famous legend ‘The Box of Daylight’. He very quickly found himself in demand as a stand alone performer and brought his talents to conventions, businesses, festivals and other gatherings all over the Pacific Northwest.
With his obvious stage presence he was offered roles in such films and Television Programs as “The Spirit of the Eagle”, “The Creative Native” and even appeared in several local theater productions. To this day Ravenspeaker is one of two featured storytellers in the Burke Museum’s storytelling exhibit.
Choreography
Ravenspeaker has created songs and dances for some of the Northwest Coast’s most well known Native Dance troupes. Most notably he was one of the founders of Tsimshian Hayuuk, created and directed the Children of the Mist Youth Dance Team and helped organize Lugulm Goodm of Vancouver BC. His proudest achievement in this medium was the fusion of ballet and traditional Northwest Coast Indian Dance in “Seattle’s Fantastic Shoppe” with the late John Wilkins of the Olympic Ballet Theater.
Events Planning
Ravenspeaker assisted in the planning of several Potlatches in Washington, Alaska and Canada. He took the lead in organizing Potlatches for the Muckelshoot Tribal School and for Indian Heritage High School.
He also created the Northwest Coast cultural component of the Seattle Aquarium’s Salmon Homecoming Celebration and ran that event for several years from 1996 through 2001.
Other Data:
His ceremonial name is Ma’alsgm Gaak (Raven Narrates). He has one son, Jade, of the Eagle Clan (Most Northwest Coast Natives reckon lineage through the maternal line) who is learning storytelling and dance at the tender age of ten and is also available for certain venues.
Ravenspeaker can be contacted at 425.329.9830 or by email at ravenspeaker@msn.com
Toiksn ada saa aam hla waan. (Thank you and may your good name go with you)

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Chief Oren Lyons on Make No Bones About It. September 29,2013 @ 4pm

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Oren R. Lyons is a traditional Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan, and a member of the Onondoga Nation Council of Chiefs of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy (the Haudenosaunee).

Lyons graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Fine Arts and soon moved to New York City, where he worked for Norcross Greeting Cards. He started as a paste-up artist but later became an art and planning director for Norcross. His background in art has helped him become an accomplished illustrator of books and a …painter.

In 1970, Lyons returned to his ancestral homeland in upstate New York to act as Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan. In this capacity, he is entrusted with keeping alive his people’s traditions, values and history.

Oren Lyons is Associate Professor at SUNY (University at Buffalo), in the Center for the Americas. He teaches courses on Native American history and studies, and advises graduate students. Prof. Lyons also appears at many conferences and meetings, speaking on American Indian topics, human rights, interfaith dialogue, and the environment.

Aside from his work at the University and the Turtle Clan, Lyons is the co-founder of the national American Indian quarterly news magazine Daybreak, of which he has been the publisher since 1987. He also edited the book Exiled In The Land Of The Free: Democracy, The Iroquois and The Constitution (1992) , a major study of the Indian’s impact on American democracy and the United States Constitution.

An essay from Oren Lyons, “Our Mother Earth,” is included in Seeing God Everywhere: Essays on Nature and the Sacred .

Donald Vann on “Make No Bones About It” -September 8th, 2013

 

The images of full blood Cherokee artist, Donald Vann, speak of peace and tranquility of solitude. They speak of yesterday’s tradition and tomorrow’s promise. Through his work, Donald takes the viewer to a place that is as real to him as the tangible world. To see his paintings is to feel the crunch of snow beneath one’s feet, to hear the wind whisper through the aspen trees and to smell the wood smoke and buffalo of hide tipis. It is to know the soft-spoken man behind the paper and paint.  Donald Vann

“All my life,” Donald explains, “I have had this desire to paint with images I can express thoughts and feelings I could never put into words. Through my art I am able to transcend the limitations of the spoken word.”

It is more than just his Native American heritage that Donald strives to share. Warriors on horseback, a medicine man greeting the dawn and young maidens gathering wood are only the means of conveying moods that are much more universal. He uses those images to tell how he feels about the unseen forces that influence life. Donald draws his greatest inspiration from the earth, sky, and from the rhythms of nature. His creations have a quality that allow the viewer to share some of the inner facets of the Indian soul. “In our world, there is an unspoken quality, a feeling that touches and flows through everything … all of us as well as all things of the earth. If one listens to these forces, he will find himself painting instinctively with the feeling of his heart about his ancestral beliefs and the way people live today.”

These spiritual elements have been a part of his life for as long as he can remember. “Growing up I was always a loner.” Donald recalls, “I spent a lot of time hunting, but that was really just a way of being by myself out of doors. That is where I felt the most comfortable and in tune with the natural spirits evident in all things.”

When he wasn’t camping with his grandfather or hunting in the woods near his boyhood home outside Stilwell, Oklahoma, Donald remembers painting. “I didn’t fit in too well at school, the one art class I took, I flunked. I always thought education got in the way of learning. I was much more interested in the teachings of the holy man for my clan and in the survival and herb skills my grandparents taught me.”

Combining his love for art and his Cherokee heritage, Donald is able to create moving images that speak of the Indian way of life and capture the hearts of art collectors worldwide. He is recognized for his haunting images of his people’s heritage, especially his portrayal of the Trail of Tears. He was proclaimed “one of the best known Indian artists of the 20th century” by the Cherokee National Historical Society. The Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of the American Indian honored him with their top painting award for watercolor medium. He has also won first place ribbons in juried competitions at Oklahoma’s Red Earth Exhibit, Colorado Indian Market and National American Indian Arts Exposition.

More than 50 different editions of his signed and numbered prints are now collectors items. He has taken top honors at shows from Texas to Ohio, and Minnesota to North Carolina. Yet, it is the public’s acceptance is what matters most to Donald.

“Through my images,” Donald says when asked of his success, “I hope people will be inspired to learn more about the customs and values of America’s native people. Our traditions teach many things that can help all people. In today’s fast-paced world, it is too easy to get cut off from one’s heritage and lose sight of the things that are truly important. If I can make people see with their hearts instead of their eyes, then my art has spoken. Then I have succeeded.” http://www.donaldvann.com/

-Remembering Chief Leonard Squally

Cheif Leonard Squally’s Wake on Friday, September 6th, 2013, 5pm. Nisqually Youth Center.

Cheif Leonard Squally's Wake on Friday, September 6th, 2013. For more information please

 

Salatupki Chief Leonard Squally April 4, 1934 – August 3, 2013 Chief Leonard Squally passed away August 3, 2013 at home. He was preceded in death by his parents, brother Kenny, sister Karen, sons Leander and Kelvin, and wife Colleen. He is survived by son Robert, brothers Lewis and Albert, sisters Caroline Byrd and Elizabeth Thomas, and numerous nieces, nephews, grandchildren and great grandchildren. A wake will be at 5pm on Friday, September 6, 2013. Funeral will be at 10am on Saturday, September 7, 2013 at the Nisqually Youth Center. The family would like to thank Providence St. Peter Hospital and Hospice, The Nisqually Clinic, and the Nisqually Tribe for the care and attention given to Chief Leonard. We would also like to thank family and friends for their support at the end.

Published in The Olympian on September 6, 2013

Read more here: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/theolympian/obituary.aspx?n=leonard-squally&pid=166824490#storylink=cpy

http://www.nisqually-nsn.gov/sites/default/files/events/September7ChiefSqually.pdf

WE WERE CHILDREN

WE WERE CHILDREN
As young children, Lyna and Glen were taken from their homes and placed in church-run boarding schools. The trauma of this experience was made worse by years of untold physical, sexual and emotional abuse, the effects of which persist in their adult lives. In this emotional film, the profound impact of the Canadian government’s residential school system is conveyed unflinchingly through the eyes of two children who were forced to face hardships beyond their years. We Were Children gives voice to a national tragedy and demonstrates the incredible resilience of the human spirit.

Tantoo Cardinal on Make No Bones About It.