Tag Archives: Cherokee

Donald Vann on “Make No Bones About It” -September 8th, 2013

 

The images of full blood Cherokee artist, Donald Vann, speak of peace and tranquility of solitude. They speak of yesterday’s tradition and tomorrow’s promise. Through his work, Donald takes the viewer to a place that is as real to him as the tangible world. To see his paintings is to feel the crunch of snow beneath one’s feet, to hear the wind whisper through the aspen trees and to smell the wood smoke and buffalo of hide tipis. It is to know the soft-spoken man behind the paper and paint.  Donald Vann

“All my life,” Donald explains, “I have had this desire to paint with images I can express thoughts and feelings I could never put into words. Through my art I am able to transcend the limitations of the spoken word.”

It is more than just his Native American heritage that Donald strives to share. Warriors on horseback, a medicine man greeting the dawn and young maidens gathering wood are only the means of conveying moods that are much more universal. He uses those images to tell how he feels about the unseen forces that influence life. Donald draws his greatest inspiration from the earth, sky, and from the rhythms of nature. His creations have a quality that allow the viewer to share some of the inner facets of the Indian soul. “In our world, there is an unspoken quality, a feeling that touches and flows through everything … all of us as well as all things of the earth. If one listens to these forces, he will find himself painting instinctively with the feeling of his heart about his ancestral beliefs and the way people live today.”

These spiritual elements have been a part of his life for as long as he can remember. “Growing up I was always a loner.” Donald recalls, “I spent a lot of time hunting, but that was really just a way of being by myself out of doors. That is where I felt the most comfortable and in tune with the natural spirits evident in all things.”

When he wasn’t camping with his grandfather or hunting in the woods near his boyhood home outside Stilwell, Oklahoma, Donald remembers painting. “I didn’t fit in too well at school, the one art class I took, I flunked. I always thought education got in the way of learning. I was much more interested in the teachings of the holy man for my clan and in the survival and herb skills my grandparents taught me.”

Combining his love for art and his Cherokee heritage, Donald is able to create moving images that speak of the Indian way of life and capture the hearts of art collectors worldwide. He is recognized for his haunting images of his people’s heritage, especially his portrayal of the Trail of Tears. He was proclaimed “one of the best known Indian artists of the 20th century” by the Cherokee National Historical Society. The Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of the American Indian honored him with their top painting award for watercolor medium. He has also won first place ribbons in juried competitions at Oklahoma’s Red Earth Exhibit, Colorado Indian Market and National American Indian Arts Exposition.

More than 50 different editions of his signed and numbered prints are now collectors items. He has taken top honors at shows from Texas to Ohio, and Minnesota to North Carolina. Yet, it is the public’s acceptance is what matters most to Donald.

“Through my images,” Donald says when asked of his success, “I hope people will be inspired to learn more about the customs and values of America’s native people. Our traditions teach many things that can help all people. In today’s fast-paced world, it is too easy to get cut off from one’s heritage and lose sight of the things that are truly important. If I can make people see with their hearts instead of their eyes, then my art has spoken. Then I have succeeded.” http://www.donaldvann.com/

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An Evening with Native American Storyteller Gayle Ross

Sunday, November 14 · 5:00pm – 6:00pm An Evening with Native American Storyteller Gayle Ross on “Make No Bones About It.”

Join Raven and his guest Gayle Ross as she shares the tradition of storytelling with us all. Through her stories comes messages for the people about treating their environment and each other with respect, and love.


About Gayle Ross
Gayle is a descendent of John Ross, principal chief of the Cherokee Nation during and after the infamous “Trail of Tears,” the forced removal of many Southeastern Indians to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) in the late 1830s. Her grandmother told stories and it is from this rich heritage that Gayle’s storytelling springs. During the past twenty years, she has become one of the most respected storytellers to emerge from the current surge of interest in this timeless art form.

Gayle has appeared at most major storytelling and folk festivals in the United States and Canada, and in concert halls and theaters throughout the US and Europe, often appearing with some of today’s finest Native American musicians and dancers. She is in demand as a lecturer and visiting artist at college campuses and she continues to mesmerize children at schools and libraries across the country. The National Council for the Traditional Arts has included Gayle in two of their touring shows, “Master Storytellers” and the all-Indian show, “From the Plains to the Pueblos.” She was invited by Vice President Al Gore to perform at a gala at his residence entitled “A Taste of Tennessee” and was the only Native American speaker chosen by the White House to appear in the “Millennium on the Mall” celebration in Washington, DC. Gayle, who has published several of her stories in illustrated books, has spoken at meetings of the American Library Association, the International Reading Association, and the International Board of Books for Young People. She was a commentator in the Discovery Channel’s award-winning documentary, “How the West Was Lost,” and her stories have been featured on the National Public Radio programs “Living on the Earth” and “Mountain Stage.”

Gerald Barnes was born in Pleasant Point, Perry, Maine and now lives in Virginia. As a child he learned traditional Passamaquoddy basket weaving from his mother and father. To make his work unique, he developed the turtle as his personal symbol. For Barnes the turtle represents longevity and sustenance but, more importantly, these slightly imperfect turtles represent the adverse effects of pollution on the environment.

RESOURCES
Books by Gayle Ross
How Rabbit Tricked Otter and other Cherokee Trickster Stories.
New York: HarperCollins, 1994.
How the Turtle’s Back Was Cracked: A Traditional Cherokee Tale.
New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1995.
The Legend of Windigo: A Tale from Native North America.
Dial Books for Young Readers, 1996.

Anthologies including stories by Gayle Ross
Bruchac, Joseph. The Girl Who Married the Moon.
Mahwah, N.J.: Troll Communications, 1994.
The Story of the Milky Way: A Cherokee Tale.
New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1995.

Established in 1989 through an Act of Congress, the National Museum of the American Indian is an institution of living cultures dedicated to the life, languages, literature, history, and arts of the Native peoples of the Western Hemisphere. The museum includes the George Gustav Heye Center, a permanent exhibition and education facility in New York City, and the Cultural Resources Center, a research and collection facility in Suitland, Maryland. A new museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., is now under construction and will open in September 2004.

For additional information on the National Museum of the American Indian visit the museum’s Website at www.AmericanIndian.si.edu.
http://www.indiancountrytoday.com/opinion/34736534.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kynbb7ba1tA

Join Raven and his guest Lori Boess, on 2-7-2010 at 5pm on “Make No Bones About It”.

Join Raven and his guest Lori Boess, on 2-7-2010 at 5pm on “Make No Bones About It”. Tune in to  KAOS 89.3 FM  dial or via the world wide web at http://www.kaosradio.org

Lori Boess, was raised here in the Northwest  in  Olympia  area where it has been here home for over 16 years. She is an artist of focusing on her Cherokee tradition. She create drums, rattles, fans, and other art. Lori  also participate in local festivals, pow wows, and other ceremonial gatherings.  You can visit her website to look at her  art www.medicinedogdrum.com or contact her at (360)280-2117. She teaches people to make drums in the ceremonial way, taught to her by GrandMother Berniece Falling Leaves.

Honoring her  teacher

Reverend Berniece Falling Leaves, is a third generation meta-physician who received most of her early training from her Grandmother, and from growing up in a Spiritualist Church. She is a Metis, half Lakota Sioux and half Danish, who received training from many Native Americans of different Tribes, Bands, and Nations. She is also guided by her Non-Physical Spiritual Teachers.  She has been actively working and teaching for more than 60 years.

 Learn more about Lori on Make No Bones About It.  Tune in 2-7-2010 at 5pm!