Tag Archives: Native American Indian

Calina Lawrence on Make No Bones About It. Feb 18th, 2018 at 4pm

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An enrolled member of the Suquamish TribeCalina Lawrence was born and raised within her Indigenous culture in the Pacific Northwest area of Washington State. She recently joined friend Shailene Woodley on the red carpet at the 2018 Golden Globe awards as part of the #MeToo movement. Calina’s vocal journey began at a young age when she was first introduced to her cultural music. While lending her voice to the preservation of Suquamish traditions, she also grew to love singing many contemporary genres. Lawrence was raised to understand the importance of spreading awareness about the social injustices that have impacted the quality of lives on tribal reservations and within urban Native communities. Her involvement in music has led her in activism in the cities of SeattleSan Francisco, and Oakland. Lawrence recently graduated with Honors from the University of San Francisco, attaining her BA in Performing Arts & Social Justice; a Music concentration. The art-ivist has spent recent time traveling the country in advocacy for Native Treaty Rights and the “Mni Wiconi” (Water is Life) movement led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe as well as the “NoLNG253” movement led by the Puyallup Tribe. Lawrence dedicates her artistry and energy to address: POC racial injustice, police brutality, mass-incarceration, gentrification, misrepresentation of Native Americans in education/mainstream United States media, climate injustice, blood quantum and enrollment issues, foster youth, suicide prevention, violence against women, and many other causes. Since graduation, this indigenous vocalist has released her debut single entitled “Alcatraz” a folk song (January ‘17) followed by the release of “Generations” (July ’17) a hip-hop track featuring 14 y/o Lil Deya.  Most recently, she has released “Don’t Count Me Out” (December ’17) featuring indigenous vocalist/emcee Desirae Harp. Lawrence will be releasing her first album in the year 2018. Lawrence will continue traveling the Nation pursuing her career as a musician/activist in the genres of Traditional FolkHip HopR&B/Soul, and Spoken Word Poetry while based out of the cities of Seattle/San Francisco.

Preview YouTube video Calina Lawrence feat. Desirae Harp- Don’t Count Me Out [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

Calina Lawrence feat. Desirae Harp- Don’t Count Me Out [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

Preview YouTube video Calina Lawrence ft. Lil Deya – Generations [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

Calina Lawrence ft. Lil Deya – Generations [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

 

 

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Help support the healing of our dear sister, Joanne Shenandoah

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July – 2016

Sekon, Greetings and Peace,

Last summer I found my immune system was severely compromised. I had been exposed to deadly bacteria called CDIFF, which spread throughout my abdomen and affected my entire renal system, which damaged my liver and caused near blindness. I was on life support for 10 days in NY and since February 2016 I have been cared for by the Mayo Clinic in Florida and relatives and loved ones as their schedule would allow. I have battled this condition and endured physical demands I could never have imagined! I have survived because of your prayers and support.

This illness has also taken a great toll on my financial situation in every way. With extensive expenses, travel, food, lodging, car rental, over the counter medications and such has necessitated a serious appeal for financial support. Kindly consider sharing this message to those of you who may know or someone who may be able to help. Every contribution is TAX DEDUCTIBLE. Checks or money orders can be mailed to: Joanne Shenandoah, Box 450, Oneida, NY 13421, or Americu Credit Union, 280 Genesee Street, Oneida, NY 13421.

I could not be where I am now without your individual kindness and generosity. I am asking for you to share far and wide because additional support is needed as we approach the actual transplant. I have every intention of carrying on with my music once I am healed, and in fact have already begun some projects both book form and music as well.

Blessings to you all as we continue on our mission to heal our lovely planet by initiating environmental, spiritual, and physical changes for ourselves while securing happiness and peace for those yet unborn.

As we journey through life we are met with many challenges. Know that my love and joy continues to spread across the planet and I am eternally grateful for the blessings of this life and the wonders which lay beyond. Looking forward to sharing some new songs of hope for you soon.

My plan is to put together a Skype course for those who are interested in learning more about the music profession. An announcement will be made on my website soon. http://www.joanneshenandoah.com

To all of you I extend my appreciation and love. I carry your hopes and prayers in my heart and soul.

In respect to all living beings,

Joanne Shenandoah

Mike Mease, co-founder of the Buffalo Field Campaign, on “Make No Bones About It.” September 13th, 2015 at 5pm

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Mike Mease, co-founder of the Buffalo Field Campaign.

Learn what you can do to help the campaign and preserve the buffalo.

Please visit their website at http://www.buffalofieldcampaign.org

Jimmy Hallum shares about Honoring the Women Memorial on “Make No Bones About It.” 5-17-2015, at 5pm

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  •  Jimmy Hallum, a Dakota 38 rider shared this story  with us. 78 winters old walked from Lower Brule, SD to Ft Thompson, SD.today . It is right around 14 miles. To honor the Dakota 38 and the 2 who were later drugged, kidnapped and later hanged. The grandmothers who suffered at Crow Creek. He said his grandfather was part of the first minnesota calvary from 1858 to 1864 that escorted the dakota out of minnesota. He was also present at the execution at Mahkahtoe or blue earth. He said he wanted to walk because his grandfather rode horseback while the Dakota walked in front. So he wanted to walk behind while the Dakota rode back into Minnesota. It was cold today but he also said the Dakota really suffered at the hands of the white man back then. I want to say nina pidamiya to him for what he did today. We need more like him. Thank you Jacob Farmer for being a human being.

 

Shayne Bennett on KAOS 89.3 fm – 2-15-2015 at 4pm

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I am Māori who links to Te Arawa and Ngati Kahungnunu tribes on the North Island of New Zealand.

I have a background in Corporate IT, HR and Government services on three continents.  Born in New Zealand, I spent my formative years in Australia and now live in Canada.  I currently travel between Canada, Australia and New Zealand following my ancestors calling.

6 years ago my ancestors called me back to New Zealand to live and that is how I was shown the current healing work that I do.  I have been an energy healer for all of my life and this ability has been active in me throughout my business career as well. By following the calling of my heart space most of my healing today is remote or distant healing.  I am able to shift energies from people and land that includes trauma in this lifetime and past lives, release Family and tribal trauma passed down through generations, remove Kehua (evil spirits) from the environment and bring harmony and peace to what I connect to.

Since my early twenties I’ve connected with and studied many alternative therapies. Two were significant — LomiLomi (Hawaiian Massage) and Romiromi (Traditional Māori Healing).  Both powerful Polynesian healing modalities.   My Remote Healing work came about as an extension of my Traditional Māori Healing  practise in New Zealand.

Traditional Māori Healing is centuries old and has been passed down from generation to generation in the form of Romiromi and Mirimiri bodywork and ancient Māori teachings. Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand and have a rich and deep cultural heritage based on their connection to the land and their spiritual beliefs. Romiromi and Mirimiri are physical bodywork treatments that focus on removing blocked energy at a cellular level, creating more space and freedom in the body. Stimulation of pressure points and deep tissue massage removes toxic waste and synchronizes the central nervous, lymphatics, cardio vascular and endocrine systems within the body. Romiromi also balances male and female energies and most importantly balances the mauri (life force) with the wairua (spirit). Blocked energy on any level can create imbalance in the body which can lead to disease. This extraneous energy can sometimes be held in the DNA or be an accumulation of held emotions in this lifetime.

Join us on “Make No Bones About It”, for an On the Air Reunited after 29 yrs. February 8th at 5pm

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Join us on “Make No Bones About It.” February 8th, 2015 at 5pm  for the on air  reunited after 29 years to the date we hear from GW Galbreath & Michael Lane.

GW Galbreath & Michael Lane  – the original co-hosts of Indian World (1986) GW Galbreath & Michael Lane – which became the Indigenous Peoples Network which became View From The Shore. Michael is back at Evergreen teaching in the MPA program.

Roy Henry Vickers on the next “Make No Bones About It.” 12-14-2014 at 4:30pm

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Canadian artist Roy Henry Vickers is best known around the world for his limited edition prints. He is also an accomplished carver, design advisor of prestigious public spaces, a sought-after keynote speaker, and publisher and author of several successful books.

In addition, he is a recognized leader in the First Nations community, and a tireless spokesperson for recovery from addictions and abuse.

Roy has received many awards and honours for his art and community involvement. Among them are a hereditary chieftainship and several hereditary names he has received from Northwest Coast First Nations.

In 1994, Maclean’s magazine included Roy as the first artist ever in its Annual Honour Roll of Extraordinary Canadian Achievers. In 1998, the Province of British Columbia appointed Roy to the prestigious Order of B.C. and in 2003, Roy received the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal. In 2003, a video featuring Roy was part of the successful Vancouver 2010 Olympic Bid.

In 1987, at the Commonwealth Summit in Vancouver, the original of Roy’s painting A Meeting of Chiefs was the official gift of the Province of British Columbia to Queen Elizabeth II. Limited edition prints of the painting were presented to the 48 Commonwealth Heads of State.

During their Vancouver Summit in 1993, former Soviet leader Boris Yeltsin and former U.S. president Bill Clinton received artist’s proofs of Roy’s print The Homecoming as the Province’s official gift.

roy candid bio picRoy’s work can be found in private and public collections and galleries around the world including the National Museum of Man (Ottawa, Ontario), University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology (Vancouver), the McMichael Canadian Art Collection (Kleinburg, Ontario) and the National Museum of Japan (Osaka).

Roy Henry Vickers was born in June 1946 in the village of Greenville, in northern British Columbia. Roy has stayed on the northwest coast of British Columbia ever since, residing at various times in Hazelton, Kitkatla, Tofino and Victoria.

Roy’s love and respect of the magnificent natural beauty of this area is clearly evident in his art. His boldly colourful sunsets, subdued misty rivers and peaceful winter scenes reflect the essence of the west coast of Canada.

Roy’s father was a fisherman with the blood of three northwest coast First Nations’ Tsimshian, Haida and Heiltsuk flowing in his veins. Roy’s mother was a schoolteacher whose parents had immigrated to Canada from England. This unusual mixed heritage has had a strong influence on Roy’s art.

Roy studied traditional First Nations art and design at the Gitanmaax School of Northwest Coast Indian Art in Hazelton.

Using these building blocks Roy, through hard work and intensive research, created his authentic and personal style of expression – a harmonious fusion of traditional and contemporary, old and new, personal and universal.

In many of his pieces, Roy uses superimposed ‘shadow images’ that add another layer of depth, history and myth to his clear, clean images. His signature Eagle Moon and various suns appear on many pieces as well.

The resulting art touches deeply and is accessible to people all over the world regardless of their background, age, beliefs or traditions.

Roy Henry Vickers Bio