Tag Archives: Native American Indian

Madonna Thunder Hawk today at 4pm on “Make No Bones About It.”

Madonna Thunder Hawk co-founded Women of All Red Nations (WARN) in 1978, organizing a health study of the drinking water on the Pine Ridge reservation. (WARN found the water to be highly radioactive, which led to the establishment of rural water supply system.) Thunder Hawk also helped organize the Black Hills Protection Committee (later the He Sapa Institute) whose goal is to protect the many sacred sites within the region’s treaty lands.

Madonna Thunder Hawk is a member of the Oohenumpa band of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe. Her life’s work has been guided by the goals of winning justice for Native Americans. Madonna is the embodiment of courage. She was an original member of the American Indian Movement, a co-founder of Women of All Red Nations (WARN), and is currently the Lakota People’s Law Project’s principal organizer and Tribal Liaison. Madonna has been featured in several documentary films including the recent PBS series We Shall Remain. She is a grandmother, both literally and figuratively, to a generation of Native American activists. Through her work, Madonna builds alliances and support for Child Welfare among South Dakota’s tribal leaders and communities.

She is a veteran of every modern Native American struggle, including the 1969 to 1971 occupation of Alcatraz to the 1973 siege at Wounded Knee. Hailing from the Feather Necklace Tiospaye, which extends across the Lakota reservations of South Dakota, Thunder Hawk is also a long-time community organizer with a range of experience in American Indian rights protection, cultural preservation, economic development, environmental justice and Lakota social reclamation.

Born and raised on a number of South Dakota reservations, she first became active in the late 1960s as a member and leader in the American Indian Movement (AIM). In addition to involvement in the national and international arena for Native sovereignty, she anchored much of her organizing at the community level. While on the federal relocation program in San Francisco she joined the occupation of Alcatraz and has since been forever consumed by the indigenous struggle for self-determination. Once drawn into activism, Thunder Hawk has been a voice of resistance ever since.

She established the “We Will Remember Survival School” for Indian youth whose parents were facing federal charges or who had been drop-outs or “push-outs” from the educational system. This alternative home/school was part of the National Federation of Native-Controlled Survival Schools that was established during the movement as many alternative schools developed. Thunder Hawk was a co-founder and spokesperson for the Black Hills Alliance, which blocked Union Carbide from mining uranium on sacred Lakota land.

An eloquent voice for Native America, Thunder Hawk has spoken throughout the United States, Central America, Europe, and the Middle East. She was an International Indian Treaty Council delegate to the United Nations Human Rights Commission in Geneva. She also was a delegate to the U.N. Decade of Women Conference in Mexico City and in 2001 to the World Conference against Racism in Durban, South Africa.

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GW from “View from the Shore”, Miss Emma from“Resilient” and me at the Spring KAOS gathering 2018.

Calina Lawrence on Make No Bones About It. Feb 18th, 2018 at 4pm

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An enrolled member of the Suquamish TribeCalina Lawrence was born and raised within her Indigenous culture in the Pacific Northwest area of Washington State. She recently joined friend Shailene Woodley on the red carpet at the 2018 Golden Globe awards as part of the #MeToo movement. Calina’s vocal journey began at a young age when she was first introduced to her cultural music. While lending her voice to the preservation of Suquamish traditions, she also grew to love singing many contemporary genres. Lawrence was raised to understand the importance of spreading awareness about the social injustices that have impacted the quality of lives on tribal reservations and within urban Native communities. Her involvement in music has led her in activism in the cities of SeattleSan Francisco, and Oakland. Lawrence recently graduated with Honors from the University of San Francisco, attaining her BA in Performing Arts & Social Justice; a Music concentration. The art-ivist has spent recent time traveling the country in advocacy for Native Treaty Rights and the “Mni Wiconi” (Water is Life) movement led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe as well as the “NoLNG253” movement led by the Puyallup Tribe. Lawrence dedicates her artistry and energy to address: POC racial injustice, police brutality, mass-incarceration, gentrification, misrepresentation of Native Americans in education/mainstream United States media, climate injustice, blood quantum and enrollment issues, foster youth, suicide prevention, violence against women, and many other causes. Since graduation, this indigenous vocalist has released her debut single entitled “Alcatraz” a folk song (January ‘17) followed by the release of “Generations” (July ’17) a hip-hop track featuring 14 y/o Lil Deya.  Most recently, she has released “Don’t Count Me Out” (December ’17) featuring indigenous vocalist/emcee Desirae Harp. Lawrence will be releasing her first album in the year 2018. Lawrence will continue traveling the Nation pursuing her career as a musician/activist in the genres of Traditional FolkHip HopR&B/Soul, and Spoken Word Poetry while based out of the cities of Seattle/San Francisco.

Preview YouTube video Calina Lawrence feat. Desirae Harp- Don’t Count Me Out [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

Calina Lawrence feat. Desirae Harp- Don’t Count Me Out [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

Preview YouTube video Calina Lawrence ft. Lil Deya – Generations [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

Calina Lawrence ft. Lil Deya – Generations [OFFICIAL VIDEO]

 

 

Help support the healing of our dear sister, Joanne Shenandoah

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July – 2016

Sekon, Greetings and Peace,

Last summer I found my immune system was severely compromised. I had been exposed to deadly bacteria called CDIFF, which spread throughout my abdomen and affected my entire renal system, which damaged my liver and caused near blindness. I was on life support for 10 days in NY and since February 2016 I have been cared for by the Mayo Clinic in Florida and relatives and loved ones as their schedule would allow. I have battled this condition and endured physical demands I could never have imagined! I have survived because of your prayers and support.

This illness has also taken a great toll on my financial situation in every way. With extensive expenses, travel, food, lodging, car rental, over the counter medications and such has necessitated a serious appeal for financial support. Kindly consider sharing this message to those of you who may know or someone who may be able to help. Every contribution is TAX DEDUCTIBLE. Checks or money orders can be mailed to: Joanne Shenandoah, Box 450, Oneida, NY 13421, or Americu Credit Union, 280 Genesee Street, Oneida, NY 13421.

I could not be where I am now without your individual kindness and generosity. I am asking for you to share far and wide because additional support is needed as we approach the actual transplant. I have every intention of carrying on with my music once I am healed, and in fact have already begun some projects both book form and music as well.

Blessings to you all as we continue on our mission to heal our lovely planet by initiating environmental, spiritual, and physical changes for ourselves while securing happiness and peace for those yet unborn.

As we journey through life we are met with many challenges. Know that my love and joy continues to spread across the planet and I am eternally grateful for the blessings of this life and the wonders which lay beyond. Looking forward to sharing some new songs of hope for you soon.

My plan is to put together a Skype course for those who are interested in learning more about the music profession. An announcement will be made on my website soon. http://www.joanneshenandoah.com

To all of you I extend my appreciation and love. I carry your hopes and prayers in my heart and soul.

In respect to all living beings,

Joanne Shenandoah

Mike Mease, co-founder of the Buffalo Field Campaign, on “Make No Bones About It.” September 13th, 2015 at 5pm

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Mike Mease, co-founder of the Buffalo Field Campaign.

Learn what you can do to help the campaign and preserve the buffalo.

Please visit their website at http://www.buffalofieldcampaign.org

Jimmy Hallum shares about Honoring the Women Memorial on “Make No Bones About It.” 5-17-2015, at 5pm

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  •  Jimmy Hallum, a Dakota 38 rider shared this story  with us. 78 winters old walked from Lower Brule, SD to Ft Thompson, SD.today . It is right around 14 miles. To honor the Dakota 38 and the 2 who were later drugged, kidnapped and later hanged. The grandmothers who suffered at Crow Creek. He said his grandfather was part of the first minnesota calvary from 1858 to 1864 that escorted the dakota out of minnesota. He was also present at the execution at Mahkahtoe or blue earth. He said he wanted to walk because his grandfather rode horseback while the Dakota walked in front. So he wanted to walk behind while the Dakota rode back into Minnesota. It was cold today but he also said the Dakota really suffered at the hands of the white man back then. I want to say nina pidamiya to him for what he did today. We need more like him. Thank you Jacob Farmer for being a human being.

 

Shayne Bennett on KAOS 89.3 fm – 2-15-2015 at 4pm

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I am Māori who links to Te Arawa and Ngati Kahungnunu tribes on the North Island of New Zealand.

I have a background in Corporate IT, HR and Government services on three continents.  Born in New Zealand, I spent my formative years in Australia and now live in Canada.  I currently travel between Canada, Australia and New Zealand following my ancestors calling.

6 years ago my ancestors called me back to New Zealand to live and that is how I was shown the current healing work that I do.  I have been an energy healer for all of my life and this ability has been active in me throughout my business career as well. By following the calling of my heart space most of my healing today is remote or distant healing.  I am able to shift energies from people and land that includes trauma in this lifetime and past lives, release Family and tribal trauma passed down through generations, remove Kehua (evil spirits) from the environment and bring harmony and peace to what I connect to.

Since my early twenties I’ve connected with and studied many alternative therapies. Two were significant — LomiLomi (Hawaiian Massage) and Romiromi (Traditional Māori Healing).  Both powerful Polynesian healing modalities.   My Remote Healing work came about as an extension of my Traditional Māori Healing  practise in New Zealand.

Traditional Māori Healing is centuries old and has been passed down from generation to generation in the form of Romiromi and Mirimiri bodywork and ancient Māori teachings. Māori are the indigenous people of New Zealand and have a rich and deep cultural heritage based on their connection to the land and their spiritual beliefs. Romiromi and Mirimiri are physical bodywork treatments that focus on removing blocked energy at a cellular level, creating more space and freedom in the body. Stimulation of pressure points and deep tissue massage removes toxic waste and synchronizes the central nervous, lymphatics, cardio vascular and endocrine systems within the body. Romiromi also balances male and female energies and most importantly balances the mauri (life force) with the wairua (spirit). Blocked energy on any level can create imbalance in the body which can lead to disease. This extraneous energy can sometimes be held in the DNA or be an accumulation of held emotions in this lifetime.