Tag Archives: Native American Indian

Join us on “Make No Bones About It”, for an On the Air Reunited after 29 yrs. February 8th at 5pm

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Join us on “Make No Bones About It.” February 8th, 2015 at 5pm  for the on air  reunited after 29 years to the date we hear from GW Galbreath & Michael Lane.

GW Galbreath & Michael Lane  – the original co-hosts of Indian World (1986) GW Galbreath & Michael Lane – which became the Indigenous Peoples Network which became View From The Shore. Michael is back at Evergreen teaching in the MPA program.

Roy Henry Vickers on the next “Make No Bones About It.” 12-14-2014 at 4:30pm

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Canadian artist Roy Henry Vickers is best known around the world for his limited edition prints. He is also an accomplished carver, design advisor of prestigious public spaces, a sought-after keynote speaker, and publisher and author of several successful books.

In addition, he is a recognized leader in the First Nations community, and a tireless spokesperson for recovery from addictions and abuse.

Roy has received many awards and honours for his art and community involvement. Among them are a hereditary chieftainship and several hereditary names he has received from Northwest Coast First Nations.

In 1994, Maclean’s magazine included Roy as the first artist ever in its Annual Honour Roll of Extraordinary Canadian Achievers. In 1998, the Province of British Columbia appointed Roy to the prestigious Order of B.C. and in 2003, Roy received the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal. In 2003, a video featuring Roy was part of the successful Vancouver 2010 Olympic Bid.

In 1987, at the Commonwealth Summit in Vancouver, the original of Roy’s painting A Meeting of Chiefs was the official gift of the Province of British Columbia to Queen Elizabeth II. Limited edition prints of the painting were presented to the 48 Commonwealth Heads of State.

During their Vancouver Summit in 1993, former Soviet leader Boris Yeltsin and former U.S. president Bill Clinton received artist’s proofs of Roy’s print The Homecoming as the Province’s official gift.

roy candid bio picRoy’s work can be found in private and public collections and galleries around the world including the National Museum of Man (Ottawa, Ontario), University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology (Vancouver), the McMichael Canadian Art Collection (Kleinburg, Ontario) and the National Museum of Japan (Osaka).

Roy Henry Vickers was born in June 1946 in the village of Greenville, in northern British Columbia. Roy has stayed on the northwest coast of British Columbia ever since, residing at various times in Hazelton, Kitkatla, Tofino and Victoria.

Roy’s love and respect of the magnificent natural beauty of this area is clearly evident in his art. His boldly colourful sunsets, subdued misty rivers and peaceful winter scenes reflect the essence of the west coast of Canada.

Roy’s father was a fisherman with the blood of three northwest coast First Nations’ Tsimshian, Haida and Heiltsuk flowing in his veins. Roy’s mother was a schoolteacher whose parents had immigrated to Canada from England. This unusual mixed heritage has had a strong influence on Roy’s art.

Roy studied traditional First Nations art and design at the Gitanmaax School of Northwest Coast Indian Art in Hazelton.

Using these building blocks Roy, through hard work and intensive research, created his authentic and personal style of expression – a harmonious fusion of traditional and contemporary, old and new, personal and universal.

In many of his pieces, Roy uses superimposed ‘shadow images’ that add another layer of depth, history and myth to his clear, clean images. His signature Eagle Moon and various suns appear on many pieces as well.

The resulting art touches deeply and is accessible to people all over the world regardless of their background, age, beliefs or traditions.

Roy Henry Vickers Bio

Raven visits with Terry E. Beckwith about “The Return of Termination”, October 19th, 2014 at 5pm

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Terry E. Beckwith

Mr. Beckwith has worked in the Indian realty field for 40 years. He retired as Director, Palm Springs Office of the Bureau of Indian Affairs. He was Area Realty Officer; Agency Realty Office; Chief, Land Titles & Records Office; Probate Examiner, Office of Hearings & Appeals.

Beckwith’s career included positions in the Pacific Region, Western Region, Southern Plains, and Northwest Region. Beckwith was on several task forces drafting regulations. He has taught classes for ICC since 1998. He has taught classes for the Bureau of Indian Affairs and American

Indian Training Center of the Desert. Beckwith graduated from Haskell Institute (now Haskell Indian Nations University) in 1970 and has received an Award in Accounting from UCLA.

Gary Farmer on “Make No Bones About It.” 4pm, 9-7-2014


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Gary Farmer and the Troublemakers established in 2005 in Santa Fe, NM is a blues band with a nefarious group of musicians including, Shakti Hayes on Bass, Beaver Thomas and Brock Stonefish on guitars, Johnny Ringo on horns, Billy Jack Meyers on drums, Hook Herrera on harmonica and Gary Farmer on vocals.

Gary Farmer and TrobleMakers

Edmund Ciccarello, Diné (Navajo), on the next Make No Bones About It. 2-2-2014 at 5pm

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Edmund Ciccarello, Diné (Navajo), Roanhorse Canyon, New Mexico.

A family man with a loving wife and beautiful children and grandchildren. I treasure making life-long friends near and far. I pray that we strive to ensure our future generations have a wonderful beautiful safe world that they can also enjoy besides us.

Brian Larney on KAOS radio 89.3 fm Olympia- Sunday, January 19th at 4pm

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We will be visiting with Choctaw Seminole  Artist, Brian Larney  on KAOS radio 89.3 fm Olympia- www.kaosradio.org this Sunday, January 19th at 4pm.  Brian’s original creations are rare archival illustrations from the past and reflect the rich culture of his tribal heritage.  His visuals are known for their contemporary style yet maintaining the cultural accuracy that honors his tribal family’s name of five generations, YA-HV-LA NE.  Brian has received the Governor’s Award at the Festival of Art, First place awards for his work at Red Earth Festival, Five Civilized Tribes Museum, Seminole Museum Signature Series, as well as served as art instructor and consultant for numerous educational and business venues.

more about Brian Larney

 

Ravenspeaker on Make No Bones About It. December 22, 2013 at 5pm

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Ravenspeaker
Native Storytelling, Choreography and Cultural Events Planning

Who is Ravenspeaker?
Ravenspeaker is the stage name for Robert Frederiksen an Alaskan Tsimshian storyteller of the Raven Clan. He was born and raised in Seattle, Washington and has travelled all over North America as a recognized Culture Bearer for the Northwest Coast’s First Peoples.
Storytelling
He began by accident as a teenager when a group of dancers needed someone to fill time on stage between sets. Although considered very young at the time he proved worthy of the honor by crafting a spell binding version of the Culture’s most famous legend ‘The Box of Daylight’. He very quickly found himself in demand as a stand alone performer and brought his talents to conventions, businesses, festivals and other gatherings all over the Pacific Northwest.
With his obvious stage presence he was offered roles in such films and Television Programs as “The Spirit of the Eagle”, “The Creative Native” and even appeared in several local theater productions. To this day Ravenspeaker is one of two featured storytellers in the Burke Museum’s storytelling exhibit.
Choreography
Ravenspeaker has created songs and dances for some of the Northwest Coast’s most well known Native Dance troupes. Most notably he was one of the founders of Tsimshian Hayuuk, created and directed the Children of the Mist Youth Dance Team and helped organize Lugulm Goodm of Vancouver BC. His proudest achievement in this medium was the fusion of ballet and traditional Northwest Coast Indian Dance in “Seattle’s Fantastic Shoppe” with the late John Wilkins of the Olympic Ballet Theater.
Events Planning
Ravenspeaker assisted in the planning of several Potlatches in Washington, Alaska and Canada. He took the lead in organizing Potlatches for the Muckelshoot Tribal School and for Indian Heritage High School.
He also created the Northwest Coast cultural component of the Seattle Aquarium’s Salmon Homecoming Celebration and ran that event for several years from 1996 through 2001.
Other Data:
His ceremonial name is Ma’alsgm Gaak (Raven Narrates). He has one son, Jade, of the Eagle Clan (Most Northwest Coast Natives reckon lineage through the maternal line) who is learning storytelling and dance at the tender age of ten and is also available for certain venues.
Ravenspeaker can be contacted at 425.329.9830 or by email at ravenspeaker@msn.com
Toiksn ada saa aam hla waan. (Thank you and may your good name go with you)

Return of the White Buffalo

Arvol Lookinghorse is a Lakota spiritual leader and 19th generation keeper of the Tradition of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf. (Wakan Chanupa). According to the Wodakota website: “People of the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota Sioux Nation believe the White Buffalo Calf Woman appeared to the tribes hundreds of years ago, bringing instruction in sacred ceremonies of how to live in balance with all life, and leaving behind a sacred bundle containing a sacred pipe of peace. She left prophecies about a time in which she would return again. The 1994 birth of a white buffalo calf is believed to have been the sign that these times were now at hand.” Arvol’s story is woven together with the return of the White Buffalo and the healing of the planet. He has travelled around the world with a message of peace and urging people to honour the earth and all of its inhabitants while promoting dialogue among indigenous people.

Raven visits with “Sihasin” November 18, 2012 4pm

Clayson Benally and Jeneda Benally of Blackfire are excited to announce their new musical side project “Sihasin”! A Navajo word that means Hope and Assurance is the basis for the duo’s new sound. Bass and Drums with vocal harmonies giving way to Navajo singing and melody creates a duophonic energy that leaves you with a feeling of Get Up, Stand up, use your voice and DO! Their unique new sound continues the power and energy of resistance for environmental and social injustices.
Biography
Brother and sister originally from Black Mesa on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona, were born into the heart of a political land dispute separating them by a fence from traditional homeland and family. They grew up protesting the environmental degradation and inhumane acts of cultural genocide against their traditional way of life.Their musical style encompasses many genres of music including rock, punk, folk, world. Jeneda and Clayson are at home on any stage.

Current Location
Navajo Nation, Arizona
Press Contact
bertabenally@gmail.com
Booking Agent
bertabenally@gmail.comBIO:
SIHASIN

(See-ha-szin)

Dine’ word- to think with hope and assurance. The process of making critical affirmative action of thinking, planning, learning, becoming experienced and confident to adapt.

Brother and sister, Jeneda and Clayson Benally of Blackfire from the Navajo (Dine’) Nation in Northern Arizona have created their own unique brand of music with bass and drums. They grew up protesting the environmental degradation and inhumane acts of cultural genocide against their traditional way of life. Their music reflects hope for equality, healthy and respectful communities and social and environmental justice.
http://sihasin.com/

Billy Frank Jr. on habitat decline and treaty rights

Billy Frank Jr., chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, talks about how the decline of salmon and salmon habitat are putting the tribes’ treaty rights at risk.

http://blogs.nwifc.org/treatyrightsatrisk/