Tag Archives: Salish Sea

Shawn Yanity tonight on “Make No Bones About It.” 3/25/18 4pm

Today from 4:00pm we will be speaking with Shawn Yanity, chairman of the Stillaguamish Tribe, and vice chair of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. Tune in and get a deeper understanding about the protecting of our Salmon, Water and the direction we all need to head in to assure the future of our salmon and the next seven generations!

http://www.kaosradio.org

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David Troutt director of Nisqually Indian Tribe Natural Resources, visits with Raven on March 29th, 2015 at 5pm

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David Troutt is director of Nisqually Indian Tribe Natural Resources and chair of Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Council

David Troutt, of Dupont, has served as the natural resources director for the Nisqually Indian Tribe since 1987. He heads a diverse department comprised of salmon harvest management, two large salmon hatcheries, shellfish management, data operations, environmental management, wildlife management, legal, administration, and budget development and monitoring. He also serves as chair of the Nisqually River Council and president of the Nisqually River Foundation. Mr. Troutt also has served on the Washington Biodiversity Council, the Executive Committee of the Tri-County Response to the Endangered Species Act, the Development Committee of the Shared Strategy for Puget Sound, the Steering Committee for the Hatchery Reform Project, and as a voting member of the Resource Advisory Committee for the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Mr. Troutt received his bachelor of science degree from the University of Washington School of Fisheries.

To save orcas, we must save salmon

Salmon scientists zoom in on plankton

Roy Henry Vickers on the next “Make No Bones About It.” 12-14-2014 at 4:30pm

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Canadian artist Roy Henry Vickers is best known around the world for his limited edition prints. He is also an accomplished carver, design advisor of prestigious public spaces, a sought-after keynote speaker, and publisher and author of several successful books.

In addition, he is a recognized leader in the First Nations community, and a tireless spokesperson for recovery from addictions and abuse.

Roy has received many awards and honours for his art and community involvement. Among them are a hereditary chieftainship and several hereditary names he has received from Northwest Coast First Nations.

In 1994, Maclean’s magazine included Roy as the first artist ever in its Annual Honour Roll of Extraordinary Canadian Achievers. In 1998, the Province of British Columbia appointed Roy to the prestigious Order of B.C. and in 2003, Roy received the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal. In 2003, a video featuring Roy was part of the successful Vancouver 2010 Olympic Bid.

In 1987, at the Commonwealth Summit in Vancouver, the original of Roy’s painting A Meeting of Chiefs was the official gift of the Province of British Columbia to Queen Elizabeth II. Limited edition prints of the painting were presented to the 48 Commonwealth Heads of State.

During their Vancouver Summit in 1993, former Soviet leader Boris Yeltsin and former U.S. president Bill Clinton received artist’s proofs of Roy’s print The Homecoming as the Province’s official gift.

roy candid bio picRoy’s work can be found in private and public collections and galleries around the world including the National Museum of Man (Ottawa, Ontario), University of British Columbia’s Museum of Anthropology (Vancouver), the McMichael Canadian Art Collection (Kleinburg, Ontario) and the National Museum of Japan (Osaka).

Roy Henry Vickers was born in June 1946 in the village of Greenville, in northern British Columbia. Roy has stayed on the northwest coast of British Columbia ever since, residing at various times in Hazelton, Kitkatla, Tofino and Victoria.

Roy’s love and respect of the magnificent natural beauty of this area is clearly evident in his art. His boldly colourful sunsets, subdued misty rivers and peaceful winter scenes reflect the essence of the west coast of Canada.

Roy’s father was a fisherman with the blood of three northwest coast First Nations’ Tsimshian, Haida and Heiltsuk flowing in his veins. Roy’s mother was a schoolteacher whose parents had immigrated to Canada from England. This unusual mixed heritage has had a strong influence on Roy’s art.

Roy studied traditional First Nations art and design at the Gitanmaax School of Northwest Coast Indian Art in Hazelton.

Using these building blocks Roy, through hard work and intensive research, created his authentic and personal style of expression – a harmonious fusion of traditional and contemporary, old and new, personal and universal.

In many of his pieces, Roy uses superimposed ‘shadow images’ that add another layer of depth, history and myth to his clear, clean images. His signature Eagle Moon and various suns appear on many pieces as well.

The resulting art touches deeply and is accessible to people all over the world regardless of their background, age, beliefs or traditions.

Roy Henry Vickers Bio

Jewel James on “Make No Bones About It.” May 19th at 5pm

TSLEIL-WAUTUTH NATION - National and International Indigenous

Jewell James is Coordinator for the Lummi Treaty Protection Task Force and Chairman of the Board of the Kluckhohn Research Center. We will be visiting about Tar Sands, No Coal Trains, Water and Treaty Rights.
contact Jewell James at email at jewellj@treatyprotection.org.
Image with caption: “Standing from right to left: National Chief Shawn-A-in-chut Atleo, Hereditary Chief Phil Lane Jr. of the Ihanktonwan Dakota and Chickasaw Nations, Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, and Deborah Parker, Vice Chair Woman of the Tulalip Tribes. Sitting in front right to left: Chief Maureen Thomas of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, Jewell James of the Lummi Tribe.
“(CNW Group/Tsleil-Waututh Nation)”.

Tribal Journey 2012

Billy Frank Jr. on habitat decline and treaty rights

Billy Frank Jr., chairman of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, talks about how the decline of salmon and salmon habitat are putting the tribes’ treaty rights at risk.

http://blogs.nwifc.org/treatyrightsatrisk/

PBS NewsHour features Swinomish Climate Change Initiative and Billy Frank Jr.

Program: PBS NewsHour

Episode: Northwest Salmon People Face a Future Without Fish

For Northwest tribes, salmon fishing is more than a food source, it’s a way of life. Now the climate may push the fish towards extinction. Together with KCTS9 and EarthFix, NewsHour visited the Swinomish Indian reservation to see how they are coping.

 

http://video.pbs.org/video/2257248299