Tag Archives: Salmon

Future of our Salmon focus on Collaboration with Seth Elsen on Make No Bones About It, July 23rd, 2017

Seth Elsen is of Mohegan descent and a member of the Brothertown Indian Nation of Wisconsin. He works for the Hood Canal Salmon Enhancement Group, creating projects and programs aimed at recovering our salmon populations and training our next generation of salmon stewards. In the past, he has worked with state and federal agencies, as well as tribal communities in resource management.

He graduated from the University of Minnesota, Morris with degrees in Tribal Resource Management and Policy, Political Science, and American Indian Studies. 

David Troutt director of Nisqually Indian Tribe Natural Resources, visits with Raven on March 29th, 2015 at 5pm

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David Troutt is director of Nisqually Indian Tribe Natural Resources and chair of Puget Sound Salmon Recovery Council

David Troutt, of Dupont, has served as the natural resources director for the Nisqually Indian Tribe since 1987. He heads a diverse department comprised of salmon harvest management, two large salmon hatcheries, shellfish management, data operations, environmental management, wildlife management, legal, administration, and budget development and monitoring. He also serves as chair of the Nisqually River Council and president of the Nisqually River Foundation. Mr. Troutt also has served on the Washington Biodiversity Council, the Executive Committee of the Tri-County Response to the Endangered Species Act, the Development Committee of the Shared Strategy for Puget Sound, the Steering Committee for the Hatchery Reform Project, and as a voting member of the Resource Advisory Committee for the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest. Mr. Troutt received his bachelor of science degree from the University of Washington School of Fisheries.

To save orcas, we must save salmon

Salmon scientists zoom in on plankton

Billy Frank Jr, Hank Adams and Willie Frank III on KAOS 89.3 fm, April 20th, 2014 at 6pm

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Left to Right

Billy Frank Jr and Hank Adams

I tell my people get ready. That guy, the salmon, he’s coming back.” – Billy Frank Jr.

Decades ago, in a far different America, salmon wars erupted on Northwest rivers. Unknown tribal members held up Indian treaties and took a stand for fishing rights. One was a Nisqually Indian named Billy Frank. “I wasn’t the Billy Frank that I am now,” the Nisqually tribal leader told reporters in 1984. “I was a bitter person.” Says friend Tom Keefe, “When I look at Billy Frank, and I guess I know more about him than most people, I can say there is a guy who decided that he could change the world by changing himself.”

 

American of the past sixty years. From his mediation of disputes between the US government and AIM in the 1970s to his key role in the Trail of Broken Treaties, Adams shaped modern Native activism. For the first time Adams’ writings are collected, providing a well-rounded portrait of this important figure and a firsthand history of Indian country in the late twentieth century.

 

Why Billy’s strategist Hank Adams is “The Most Important Indian”

You could never run out of adjectives describing Hank Adams. The Assiniboine Sioux is uncommonly gifted and marvelously complex. He is as elusive as he is loyal—and rarely without sarcasm. Though few outsiders grasp his role, Adams’s mark is everywhere in Indian Country, from its seminal events to its most obscure. Billy’s friend for a half century, Adams has played a central character at every turn in the Nisqually elder’s life. Hank was the one “making sure you understood that there was a problem,” muses Dan Evans, former governor, of their respective roles in the divisive fish wars. “And Billy was the guy who very quickly started to say, ‘This isn’t working. We’ve got to find a better answer.”

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Willie Frank; Billy Frank Jr.; and Fran Wilshusen at the Nisqually Tribe’s charitable event. Photo by Peggan Hines

 

Willie brings extensive tribal governance experience to his role as a Councilmember. A graduate of Evergreen State College’s Native American Studies program, Willie plans to use his education to work for and with tribal members to plan future growth and development.