Tag Archives: Canada

A.W. Mason on “Make No Bones About It.” June 28, 2015 at 4:30pm

296603_10150908053475203_1300835141_n 2008 Native-E-Music Award Winner Andy Mason is an Upper Cayuga/Mohawk musician with 20+ years on stage as an actor, multi-instrumentalist/singer/songwriter. Presently in Ottawa, playing small venues. He plays guitar, mandolin, percussion, drums, bass, harmonica, and has a 3-plus octave range. He is an experienced harmony singer and session musician (most of the instruments, programming and harmonies on his CD are his own). A.W.Mason Music

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Deloria Many Grey Horses shares on “Make No Bones About It.” 4-26-2015 at 4:30 pm

10511600_10104143737982673_5751566715818436358_oDeloria Many Grey Horses‘ projects give voice to at-risk Indigenous youth. Many Grey Horses draws out the youths’ perspectives and cultural understandings from their stories. As one of the main youth leaders in a documentary, A Place at the Table, she helped to spread awareness on what it means to live in mainstream culture while holding on to your roots. Many Grey Horses worked in Thailand, Cambodia, the Philippines, and Indonesia, on behalf of the Four Worlds International Institute, with the Canadian Government funded SEARCH Project. This initiative worked with Regional Southeast Asia Partners for Advancing Human Rights, Gender Issues, Child Protection, Ethnic Minorities and Indigenous Peoples.

This initiative focused on curriculum development and facilitating training programs for co-creating community-based social media, improving digital literacy and strengthening digital technology capacities for regional, national and local NGO’s. Many Grey Horses’ work has a special emphasis on ethnic minority and Indigenous young peoples and their communities. Her recent work as project manager of the Manual of Aboriginal Best Practices in Sports and Wellbeing is aimed at a young audience. The manual helps young Indigenous people deal with cultural identity loss and emotional disconnection amidst other social and economic pressures. An Aboriginal engagement consultant at the Office of the Child and Youth Advocate in Alberta, Many Grey Horses’ work addresses the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual health of Indigenous youth. She notes that 68% of young people in care in Alberta are Indigenous and in Edmonton, the percentage of Indigenous youth in the criminal justice system hovers around 80%. In this role, she is dedicated to creating a strong relationship between Indigenous communities and government, provide cultural awareness training for youth serving agencies and provide rights based training to youth in care and in the criminal justice system. From the Kainai Nation, Many Grey Horses uses storytelling as a vehicle to deliver each person’s message. She gives Indigenous young people personal freedom to express themselves.

http://fwii.net

Chief Beau Dick visits with Raven Redbone, 3-9-2014 at 4:30 pm

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Beau Dick

Kwakwaka’wakw

(1955- )

Beau Dick was born in Alert Bay on the Northern tip of Vancouver Island and was raised in the neighbouring Kwakwaka’wakw village of Kingcome Inlet. The isolation of the remote villages slowed down the processes of cultural destruction, which had devastated many other villages on the coast. Many of the Kwakwaka’wakw master artists, including Willie Seaweed, Charlie James, and Mungo Martin as well as Beau’s father Ben Dick and grandfather James Dick carried the art and culture through the period of cultural assimilation and transition to become among the first carvers to receive recognition as “name” artists beyond the cultural definition. They also carried the wealth of songs, dances, and ceremonial rites, which were passed on to the dedicated young artists such as Beau who was among the first artists of the modern era. Alert Bay remains a cultural centre as well as producing such noted artists as Wayne Alfred, Russell Smith, Bruce Alfred and Doug Cramner.

Beau’s first carving was a miniature totem pole based on the pole his father carved to commemorate the visit of King George XI. His father also carved the largest freestanding totem pole (173-feet) to commemorate Canada’s centennial in 1967.

Beau moved to Vancouver to complete high school. He became interested in painting and produced several large canvases in a naturalistic style representing Kwakwaka’wakw mythological figures and ceremonial dancers. He continued to carve and received several important commissions while still a young artist; he painted the dance screen for the Cape Mudge museum and was among the youngest artists chosen for the Legacy Exhibition.

The Legacy Exhibition (documented in the book The Legacy—Traditions and Innovation in Northwest Coast Indian Art by Peter Macnair) hosted by the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria (1972) was one of the first major exhibitions to focus on contemporary artists. The exhibition traveled until 1982. The exhibition and catalogue became a major resource for the growing collector base interested in contemporary Northwest Coast art. Beau exhibited two works, a Noohmahl (fool dancer) and a Tuxw’id or Kominicka mask both carved in the powerful tradition of the War Spirit Ceremony. These masks were instrumental in building the market for the more powerful and darker subjects of the Kwakwaka’wakw traditional ceremonies.

Beau is a prolific and respected artist. He was chosen to carve the large four way split transformation mask for the Canadian Pavilion at Expo ‘86 in Vancouver, British Columbia, now in the collection of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull, Quebec. He was also commissioned to carve a major eleven-figure pole by the City of Vancouver for Stanley Park.

©2001 Spirit Wrestler Gallery

INVITATION FROM DAVE COURCHENE (NII GAANI AKI ININI – LEADING EARTH MAN), ANISHNABE NATION

INVITATION FROM DAVE COURCHENE (NII GAANI AKI ININI – LEADING EARTH MAN), ANISHNABE NATION
• To the Elders, Bundle carriers, Oral historians and Traditional knowledge keepers to gather at the Turtle Lodge in the Sagkeeng First Nation in southeastern Manitoba. Open to All!
• **THIS IS A DRUG/ALCOHOL-FREE EVENT**
LOCATION
• At the Turtle Lodge: a place built from a vision, with volunteer assistance and which is completely independent from outside organizations, associations and funding
• Camping is available on site and at the Sagkeeng Pow Wow grounds. Showers available at Sagkeeng arena. Hotels are available nearby. Location & directions at http://theturtlelodge.org/visit.html
COST
• Individuals will be responsible for their own travel and accommodation expenses
• Visitors are welcome to camp on site
• Communities & organizations are invited to sponsor an Elder’s expenses
• Bring food, chairs, tobacco and a donation of your choice to contribute to the gathering!
• We’re asking All those Attending the GATHERING OF THE WISDOM KEEPERS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF THE AMERICAS May 24-27 to support the Gathering by bringing food to share for each meal. This will be a Traditional gathering, following the Spirit of our Indigenous Ancestors. The Strength of the Gathering will be determined by the Giving and Sharing that takes place 🙂
CELEBRATION ROUND DANCE AT POW WOW GROUNDS FRIDAY MAY 25
• We are making a Call for Traditional Dancers and Drums for the CELEBRATION *ROUND DANCE* at the Sagkeeng Pow Wow Grounds Friday May 25. You don’t have to be a Traditional Dancer to participate… the Round Dance will be open to all People! If enough people come out the first day, the Round Dance will continue Saturday May 26! Contact turtlelodge@mts.net for more information!
HEALING CEREMONIES
• There will be Healing Ceremonies at Turtle Lodge – Thursday Evening May 24, 2012, starting at 7 pm.
AGENDA
• Daily Sunrise Ceremonies
• Original Instructions on How to Live a Good Life
• Creation Stories
• Sacredness of Life Teachings from the Grandmothers
• Vision Quest Teachings from Grandfathers
• The Great Binding Law of the Creator (Ogitchi Tibakonegaywin)
• Original Understanding of the Treaties
• Traditional Approaches to Health
• Prophecies
• The Seven Teachings
• Youth Presentations
• Taking Care of Mother Earth
• Restoring Family Values
SPEAKERS INCLUDING
• Elder Betty Ann Little Wolf
• Elder Katherine Whitecloud
• Elder Eleanor Skeade
• Elder Laura Horton
• Elder Mary Lorraine Mandamin
• Janet Fox
• Rainey Gaywish
• Elder Dave Courchene
• Elder Robert Greene
• Elder Arvol Looking Horse
• Elder Morris Little Wolf
• Elder Adolphus Cameron
• Elder Harry Bone
• Elder Peter Atkinson
• Elder Tommy White
• First Nations Leader Ovide Mercredi
• Youth Leader Erica Daniels
• Youth Leader Jerry Daniels
• Comedian Moccasin Joe
• Local Talent from Sagkeeng First Nation
JOIN THE EVENT ON FACEBOOK!
https://www.facebook.com/events/256833127688864/
CONTACT turtlelodge@mts.net

New Year Day 1-1-2012 -“Prophecies and Possibilities of 2012 and Beyond” with Uncle Phil Lane Jr.

” Prophecies and Possibilities of 2012 and Beyond”, An Indigenous Perspective with Uncle Phil Lane Jr.

Chief Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First Nations and is an internationally recognized leader in human and community development. He was born at the Haskell Indian Residential School in Lawrence, Kansas in 1944, where his mother and father met and attended school. He is a citizen of both Canada and the USA.

During the past 43 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North,Central and South America, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as Associate Professor and Founder and Coordinator of the Four Worlds International Institute at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. Four Worlds became an independent Institute in 1995. As well, Phil is Chairman of Four Directions International, an Aboriginal company, which was incorporated in 1996 as Four Worlds’ Economic Development Arm.

With Phil’s guidance and applied experience, Four Worlds has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development. Four Directions International, Four World’s economic development arm, is lead by its President Deloria ManyGrey Horses, and is dedicated to the development of sustainable economic enterprises that support wholistic, political, social, cultural, environmental, spiritual and educational development.

In 1977, Phil was named a Modern Indian Sports Great by the National Indian Magazine, Wassaja, for his record-breaking accomplishments in Track and Wrestling. He has extensive experiencei n his own cultural traditions, is an award winning author and film producer and holds Master’s Degrees in Education and Public Administration. His film credits include the National Public Television series “Images of Indians” with the late Will Sampson, “Walking With Grandfather”, “The Honor of All: The Story of Alkali Lake” and “Healing the Hurts”.

In August, 1992, Phil was the first Indigenous person to win the prestigious Windstar Award, presented annually by the late John Denver and the Windstar Foundation to a global citizen whose personal and professional life exemplifies commitment to a global perspective, operates with awareness of the spiritual dimension of human existence and demonstrates concrete actions of the benefit for humans and all living systems of the Earth. At this International event, in recognition of his lineage and long time service to Indigenous peoples and the human family, Indigenous Elders from across North America recognized Phil as a Hereditary Chief through a Sacred Headdress Ceremony. Other Windstar winners include:Oceanologist Jacques-Yves Cousteau, David Brower, Founder of the Earth Island Institute, Yevgeni Velikhov, Vice President of the Soviet Academy of Sciences,Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Winner and founder of Kenya’s Greenbelt Movement; Akio Matsumura, Executive Director of The Global Forum, and Lester Brown, President of the World Watch Institute.

On November 11, 2000, Phil received the Year 2000 award from the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rightsin Berne, Switzerland. Phil is the first North or South American person to receive the award, and he joins a select international group: the Dalai Lama ofTibet, Dr. Boutro Boutros Ghali, former Secretary General of the United Nations, and British Lord Yehudi Menuhin, musician and philosopher, have, also, received the award. The foundation says the award is in recognition of Phil’s “unique contributions to improve the lives and future hopes of Indigenous populations. It is primarily based on his most special merits of promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity rather than opposing oppression directly and also on his international visionary initiatives among Indigenous populations, by healing the root causes of hopelessness and despair.”

On June 21, 2008, Phil was awarded the 14th Annual Ally Award by the Center for Healing Racism in Houston, Texas. Phil received the Ally Award for his national and international work in promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity that focuses on healing the root causes of racism and oppression rather than focusing on conflict. The Ally Award is an annual award presented by the Houston-based Center for the Healing of Racism to honor the achievements of those who have worked hard to achieve harmony of all ethnic and cultural groups.

Special emphasis on this award is for Lane’s dedicated work as one of the primary leaders in the resolution of Canada’s Residential School issue, which involved the sexual, physical,cultural, psychological, and emotional abuse of thousands of Aboriginal Children in Canada. This effort resulted in a $3.5 Billion settlement for survivors, a full public apology by the Prime Minister of Canada and all Political Party Leaders on the floor of the Canadian Parliament, the establishment of a $500 million Aboriginal Healing Foundation and a formal, five year, Truth and Reconciliation Commission that is currently holding public hearings across Canada on the impact of the Residential Schools on the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada.

In 2008, Phil completed his three-year tenure as Chief Executive Officer of the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF) in Seattle, Washington. The Foundation’s achievements include the launching of the first-ever Native American Film Festival, the development of a host of innovative education programs ranging from elementary and high school curriculum design and development, to adult education, early childhood education, and the recent launching of a $3.5 million holistic poverty-alleviation program model for urban Indigenous Peoples in Seattle.

Phil has now stepped into global leadership as Chairman of the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) and Four Directions International. The Institute’s central program initiative is the promotion of The Fourth Way. The primary focus of The Fourth Way is to unify the human family by taking aculturally based, principal-centered path that transcends assimilation,resignation, and conflict. FWII has been working to develop a comprehensive,community-based development strategy that offers educational opportunity, IC3 Global Digital Literacy Certification, Deep Social Networks (DSN), and Social Media Training through a global networking initiative called “Indig.e.Net.”This digitally-based, globally unifying Indigenous communications and educational initiative, to be established at the Ciudad Del Saber in Panama City, Panama in 2011 will serve as one of the key components for implementing The Fourth Way across the Americas.

As well, over the past five years, Phil and the FWII DSN Team, led by Deloria Many Grey Horses, have been building DSN’s and implementing the Fourth Way across ASEAN ( SE Asia ) with a focus on Ethnic Minorities and Human Rights.

Thisinitiative is funded by the Canadian International Development Agency.

HERIDITARYCHIEF PHIL LANE JR.

Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First Nations and is an internationally recognized leader in human and community development. He was born at the Haskell Indian Residential School in Lawrence, Kansas in 1944, where his mother and father met and ttended school. He is a citizen of both Canada and the USA.

During the past 43 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North,Central and South America, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as Associate Professor and Founder and Coordinator of the Four Worlds International Institute at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. Four Worlds became an independent Institute in 1995. As well, Phil is Chairman of Four Directions International, an Aboriginal company, which was incorporated in 1996 as Four Worlds’ Economic Development Arm.

With Phil’s guidance and applied experience, Four Worlds has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational
development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance ofculture and spirituality in all elements of development. Four Directions International, the Institute economic development arm, is lead by its President Deloria ManyGrey Horses, and is dedicated to the development of sustainable economic enterprises that support holistic, political, social, cultural, environmental,spiritual and educational development.

In 1977, Phil was named a Modern Indian Sports Great by the National Indian Magazine, Wassaja, for his record-breaking accomplishments in Track and Wrestling. He has extensive experience in his own cultural traditions, is an award winning author and film producer and holds Master’s Degrees in Education and Public Administration. His film credits include the National Public Television series “Images of Indians” with the late Will Sampson, “Walking With Grandfather”, “The Honor of All: The Story of Alkali Lake” and “Healing the Hurts”.

In August, 1992, Phil was the first Indigenous person to win the prestigious Windstar Award, presented annually by the late John Denver and the Windstar Foundation to a global citizen whose personal and professional life exemplifies commitment to a global perspective, operates with awareness of the spiritual dimension of human existence and demonstrates concrete actions of the benefit for humans and all living systems of the Earth. At this International event, in recognition of his lineage and long time service to Indigenous peoples and the human family, Indigenous Elders from across North America recognized Phil as a Hereditary Chief through a Sacred Headdress Ceremony. Other Windstar winners include:Oceanologist Jacques-Yves Cousteau, David Brower, Founder of the Earth Island Institute, Yevgeni Velikhov, Vice President of the Soviet Academy of Sciences,Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Winner and founder of Kenya’s Greenbelt Movement; Akio Matsumura, Executive Director of The Global Forum, and Lester Brown, President of the World Watch Institute.

On November 11, 2000, Phil received the Year 2000 award from the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights in Berne, Switzerland. Phil is the first North or South American person to receive the award, and he joins a select international group: the Dalai Lama of Tibet, Dr. Boutro Boutros Ghali, former Secretary General of the United Nations, and British Lord Yehudi Menuhin, musician and philosopher, have, also,received the award. The foundation says the award is in recognition of Phil’s”unique contributions to improve the lives and future hopes of native populations. It is primarily based on his most special merits of promoting freedom and justice for indigenous people by building human and spiritual capacity rather than opposing oppression directly and also on his international visionary initiatives among Native populations by healing the root causes of hopelessness and despair.”

On June 21,2008, Phil was awarded the 14th Annual Ally Award by the Center for Healing Racism in Houston, Texas. Phil received the Ally Award for his national and international work in promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity that focuses on healing the root causes of racism and oppression rather than focusing on conflict. The Ally Award is an annual award presented by the Houston-based Center for the Healing of Racism to honor the achievements of those who have worked hard to achieve harmony of all ethnic and cultural groups. Special emphasis on this award is for Lane’s dedicated work as one of the primary leaders in the resolution of Canada’s Residential School issue, which involved the sexual, physical,cultural, psychological, and emotional abuse of thousands of Aboriginal People sin Canada. This effort resulted in a $3.5 Billion settlement for survivors, a full public apology by the Prime Minister of Canada and all Political Party Leaders on the floor of the Canadian Parliament, the establishment of a $500 million Aboriginal Healing Foundation and a formal, five year, Truth and Reconciliation Commission that is currently holding public hearings across Canada on the-impact of the Residential Schools on the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada.

In 2008,Phil completed his three-year tenure as Chief Executive Officer of the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF) in Seattle, Washington. The-foundation’s achievements include the launching of the first-ever Native American Film Festival, the development of a host of innovative education programs ranging from elementary and high school curriculum design and development, to adult education, early childhood education, and the recent launching of a $3.5 million holistic poverty-alleviation program model for urban Indigenous Peoples in Seattle.

Phil has now stepped into global leadership as Chairman of the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) and Four Directions International. The Institute’s central program initiative is the promotion of The Fourth Way. The primary focus of The Fourth Way is to unify the human family by taking a culturally based, principal-centered path that transcends assimilation,resignation, and conflict. FWII has been working to develop a comprehensive,community-based development strategy that offers educational opportunity, IC3Global Digital Literacy Certification, Deep Social Networks (DSN), and Social Media Training through a global networking initiative called “Indig.e.Net.”This digitally-based, globally unifying Indigenous communications ande ducational initiative, to be established at the Ciudad Del Saber in Panama City, Panama in 2010, will serve as one of the key components for implementing The Fourth Way across the Americas.

As well, over the past five years, Phil and his DSN SEARCH Team, led by Deloria Many Grey Horses, have been building DSN’s and implementing the Fourth Way across ASEAN ( SE Asia ) with a focus on Ethnic Minorities and Human Rights.

This initiative is funded by the Canadian International Development Agency.

Melina LaboucanMassimo Cree First Nation : Speaks on the Tar Sands

Melina Laboucan-Massimo is Lubicon Cree from Northern Alberta and is helping lead a delegation of indigenous leaders from Canada and the United States to take part in the Tar Sands Action. She has been working as an advocate for Indigenous rights for the past 10 years. She has written articles and produced a short documentary for Redwire Media Society covering topics ranging from the tar sands to inherent treaty rights and cultural appropriation. She has studied and worked in Australia, Brazil, Mexico, and Canada, with a focus on Indigenous rights and culture, resource extraction and international diplomacy. Before joining Greenpeace as a tar sands campaigner in Alberta in April 2009, she was pursuing her Masters in Environmental Studies at York University.

Melina has campaigned to raise awareness about the recent oil spill in the Peace River watershed in Alberta. She is featured in Greenpeace’s photo essay about the spill and its impact on local communities.

Bio from:
http://www.tarsandsaction.org/press/spokespeople/

 

Make No Bones About It Evening with Andy Mason

Make No Bones About It Evening with Andy Mason-Sunday, March 7th, 2010 at 5pm

Andy Mason is an award-winning First Nations (Upper Cayuga/Mohawk) singer/songwriter/actor and multi-instrumentalist, with over twenty years on stage as a musician or actor. His unique style and voice has won a few accolades, and continues to win over fans.

He has maintained that he remembers singing before talking; listening to the radio as a small child, by six he learned to imitate the voices of the singers of his favorite songs. In a family of musicians (his late mother, his sister, and three older brothers who all played music), Andy was always more interested in music and the stage than most anything else. By age seven, he taught himself to play drums and percussion. He sang in choirs, and tried acting too, landing a small part in an ‘operetta’, where people immediately recognized his potential.

In 1979, he was invited to play for his high school assembly. It was a turning point for him; while teaching himself songs by Supertramp and Stevie Wonder, two of his many influences then, one of his older brothers lent him a Rickenbacker electric guitar which he took home to teach himself. Within a few months, he was playing original and cover songs on stage, both on piano and guitar, to standing ovations for his high school in Smithville, Ontario. He moved to Toronto in 1983, with 15 dollars and a beat-up SilverTone guitar, and pursued a career in both music and acting. He was soon introduced to musicians/actors David Campbell, Don Francks, Gary Farmer, Graham Greene, a then-seventeen-year old Eric schweig, and Floyd “Red Crow” Westerman. He became a regular peformer at the first all-Native run coffee house in Toronto, The Native Expressions Night, at the Trojan Horse Cafe on Danforth.

Within a year, on the urging of his father, the late James E. Mason, OMC, he was accepted into K.Y.T.E.S., a unique ensemble community theater group, who took youth from the streets and taught them job skills, confidence and theater skills. The troupe toured Canada in ’85, and was the subject of a Sunrise Films Documentary, directed by Deepa Mehta, and featured music by Andy and his sister Corine.

At a coffeehouse beside the legendary El Mocambo, in front of peers and family in 1986, he was given the name Kahn-tah-wi-wim’-tchi-get, which in Anishinabe(Ojibway) means, “He who makes Beautiful Music”, or simply, “Beautiful Music Maker”. While doing theater and busking around Toronto, he met others busking on Yonge Street, and they formed a band called 4 Way Street, covering the songs of CSNY. (Andy was always a fan of Neil Young; when he was given his Ojibway name, he was learning songs from “Rust Never Sleeps”). They relocated to the Ottawa and Kingston area, and toured around Canada from ’88 to ’95, opening for many major acts along the way. CSN had even heard of them; Andy met them at their show in ’89 at the NAC in Ottawa. Crosby and Nash reportedly liked their sound. The late great Jeff Healey jumped onstage to perform CSNY songs with them at the Penguin Club, Canada Day 1993. In late summer 1995 one member, John Law, had met Michelle Chiasson, at a show in Delta, where 4 Way Street played an outdoor party for the carnies. Soon after, John and Michelle left Ontario behind, got married, and became award-winning singer/songwriter duo “The Laws” (http://www.reverbnation.com/thelaws). After John’s departure, Andy went on his own, playing solo shows as well as with other bands, and helped others develop their craft.

In 1994, Andy won “Adult Male Vocal Performer” on local Ottawa program “HomeGrown Gafe”, on CJOH-TV, one of the first performers to play his own original compositions on that show. He also fought for buskers’ right to play and busk in Ottawa in the early 90s’; many buskers at the time were harassed by authorities for playing on the street and the Byward Market. Soon after, that changed somewhat due to Andy’s and others’ efforts.

He moved to the Lower Mainland of B.C. in ’98; relocated Ottawa musician David Roy Parsons (http://www.myspace.com/davidroyparsons) encouraged and helped him to put together an album of songs he had been writing since his coffeehouse days. The result was “Long Walk 49”; the title song written in the KYTES days, one of the featured songs in the Sunrise Films documentary.

The late songwriter and friend of Andy’s and John Laws’, Ed Daley, once called Andy ‘the most versatile voice to come out of Ottawa in years’. Brian Rading from the Five Man Electrical Band, who played shows with 4 Way Street, and who played with Andy for his last solo show in Ottawa before Andy moved to British Columbia, encouraged and assisted Andy with his songwriting. John Law once told someone that Andy was ‘the Harmony Master’, quite the compliment, as both John and Michelle Law are accomplished harmony singers. He played mandolin, harmonica and banjo and sang backup vocals for Joey Only on his debut CD (http://www.myspace.com/xjoeyonlyx), as well as several David Roy Parsons’ recordings. He shared a win with Star Nayea at the Native-E Music Awards in Albequerque, New Mexico in 2008, in the “Mainstream Song of the Year” category, for his song “The Battle Raging”.

Over the years, he has acted on stage and screen, and has done occasional extra work in movies and television, and continued playing music with various others. In 2002, he teamed up with guitarist/music producer Michael Arthur Tait(http://www.e-balance.ca/stringbenderproductions/testimonials.html, http://www.myspace.com/mikeguitarstringbender) and they formed ‘Andy and the Tricksters’, playing both Andy’s and Mike’s original music, opening for Native acts such as George Leach and RedBone for crowds of up to 10000. He has also shared the stage with the late Floyd ‘Red Crow’ Westerman, Joanne Shenandoah, Willie Dunn, and Keith Secola. He has taken part in powwows as well, either as a powwow singer or playing his own music.

He relocated to Ottawa in the summer of 2009, to begin new projects, and still occasionally plays with “4 Way Street”, and old-time rock and roll cover band “Lightning”. He continues to pursue his many interests.

http://www.reverbnation.com/andywmason#/page_object/page_object_bio/artist_263629