Tag Archives: KAOS Radio

This Sunday, at 5 pm we will be tuning into Radio Free Alcatraz, cira 1970 with John Trudell.

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Would like to express my deepest thanks to Pacifica Radio Archives for providing both December 15, 197o and December 19th, 1970 segments for our listening. So tune in this Sunday at 5pm and listening to Free Radio Alcatraz with John Trudell.

Tune in to KAOS Radio

 

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Global Economic Challenges with Chief Phil Lane Jr. and Sylvia Demarest on Make No Bones About It. August 23, 2015 5pm

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Chief Phil Lane Jr. (Philip Nathan Lane, Jr.) (born 1944) is a traditionally recognized Hereditary Chief and Elder. He is an enrolled member of the Ihanktonwan Dakota and Chickasaw Nations, and is a citizen of both Canada and the United States.  For more info visit site: http://www.fwii.net/

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Sylvia M. Demarest is a lawyer in Dallas, Texas focusing on various areas of law. Sylvia, is one of the top 10 lawyers in the country. Name of her practice is Demarest and Giunta Pllc/Attorney.

Eddie Little Crow on “Make No Bones About It.” May 24th, 2015 at 4:30pm

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Ed Little Crow is Lakota, Dakota member of the Elders Council in S. Oregon, veteran of the Seige of Wounded Knee, 1973, father and poet. His years as a quiet, steady force in the Oregon communities within which he has lived, worked and prayed have etched themselves into the psyche of all he meets.

Sandy White Hawk on “Make No Bones About It” May 17th, 2015 at 4pm

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Wicoicage Aki Un Ku Pi

Generation After Generation We Are Coming Home

Sandra White Hawk is a Sicangu Lakota adoptee from the Rosebud Reservation, South Dakota. She is the founder and Director of First Nations Repatriation Institute.

First Nations Repatriation Institute (FNRI) is the first organization of its kind whose goal it is to create a resource for First Nations people impacted by foster care or adoption to return home, reconnect, and reclaim their identity.  The Institute also serves as a resource to enhance the knowledge and skills of practitioners who serve First Nations people.

Sandra organizes Truth Healing Reconciliation Community Forums that bring together adoptees/fostered individuals and their families and professionals with the goal to identify post adoption issues and to identify strategies that will prevent removal of First Nations children.  She has also initiated an ongoing support group for adoptees and birth relatives in the Twin Cities Area.

Sandra has become a spokesperson on the issues of the adoption and the foster care system and how it has impacted First Nations People. She has traveled throughout the United States, Canada, Costa Rica, Australia and Japan, Alaska sharing her inspirational story of healing.

She is a Commissioner for the Maine Wabanaki State Child Welfare Truth and Reconciliation Commission and serves as an Honorary Witness of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Residential Schools in Canada

She is a contributing author to Outsiders Within, J. J. Trenka, J. C. Oparah & S. Y. Shin (Eds.), Outsiders within: Writing on transracial adoption (pp.). Cambridge, MA, South End Press,  Parenting as Adoptees, Adam Chau, Kevin Ost-Vollmers (Editors) and The Kinship Parenting Toolbox, Edited by Kim Phagan-Hansel

Sandra was awarded the Women in Wellbriety Dana Tiger Award for Creating Change in Nations, named one of the Innovators in Color Lines Magazine, named one of the 50 Visionaries Who are Changing Your World, Utne Reader, named Outstanding Native Women Award from the University of Minnesota 2003 and was named one of the “50 Most Influential and Cool People” of Madison, WI, in Madison Magazine, November 2002.

 WE ARE COMING HOME

Alan Parker, a Citizen of the Chippewa Cree Tribal Nation, on “Make No Bones About It.” 3-15-2015, 5pm

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Alan Parker, a Citizen of the Chippewa Cree Tribal Nation, serves as Adjunct Faculty for Tribal Students enrolled in the Indigenous Development and Advancement PhD program at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

Alan Parker served as Staff Director, Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Washington, DC, where was appointed by Senator Daniel K Inouye, Chairman of the Committee. His responsibilities as Staff Director included the development of a comprehensive legislative program for the Committee. Major legislative initiatives of the Committee during this time included the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, the National Museum of American Indian Act, the Indian Self-Governance Act, the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act and the Indian Housing Act. In the 1980’s, Alan served as President, The American Indian National Bank, Washington, DC. The AINB was the only National Bank in the US owned and operated by Indian Tribes. Established in 1974, the Tribal Shareholders engaged in commercial banking serving a market of Tribal Business enterprises. Prior to this, he was appointed by Sen. James Abourezk and served as Chief Counsel, Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Washington, DC, from April 1977 until July 1980. The Select Committee was created to serve as the first independent legislative Committee within the US Congress with responsibility for all legislative proposals dealing with Native American issues and concerns. They also exercised congressional oversight authority over federal agencies and offices charged with US Trust Responsibilities and public services for the 350 Indian Tribal and Alaska Native communities located in the US. Major legislative activities conducted under Parker’s term in this office included The Indian Child Welfare Act, The American Indian Religious Freedom Act, and Tribal Colleges authorizing Authority as well as historical Indian Land and Water Rights Legislative Settlements.

Education Achievements: Parker attended UCLA School of Law, Los Angeles, California, where he received a Juris Doctor degree in June 1972. Parker’s work researching Tribal and State Court Relationships led to publication of his work in the University of Montana Law Review

Military Service: In June 1965 Parker was drafted into the US Army and was sent to Officer Candidate School where he received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Signal Corps and served until August 1968 when he was honorably discharged. Prior to being discharged he was awarded a Bronze Star medal for meritorious service under combat conditions in the Republic of South Vietnam.

Robert A. Williams Jr. on “Make No Bones About It.” Another Perspective on American Indian Law. 1-11-15 at 4pm

Robert Williams

Robert A. Williams, Jr. is the E. Thomas Sullivan Professor of Law and Faculty Co-Chair of the University of Arizona Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy Program. Professor Williams received his B.A. from Loyola College (1977) and his J.D. from Harvard Law School (1980). He was named the first Oneida Indian Nation Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School (2003-2004), having previously served there as Bennet Boskey Distinguished Visiting Lecturer of Law. He is the author of The American Indian in Western Legal Thought: The Discourses of Conquest (1990), which received the Gustavus Meyers Human Rights Center Award as one of the outstanding books published in 1990 on the subject of prejudice in the United States.  He has also written Linking Arms Together: American Indian Treaty Visions of Law and Peace, 1600-1800 (1997) and Like a Loaded Weapon: The Rehnquist Court, Indian Rights and the Legal History of Racism in America (2005). He is co-author of Federal Indian Law: Cases and Materials (6th ed., with David Getches, Charles Wilkinson, and Matthew Fletcher, 2011). His latest book is Savage Anxieties: The Invention of Western Civilization (Palgrave Macmillan 2012). The 2006 recipient of the University of Arizona Koffler Prize for Outstanding Accomplishments in Public Service, Professor Williams has received major grants and awards from the Soros Senior Justice Fellowship Program of the Open Society Institute, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, the U.S. Department of Education, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the National Institute of Justice. He has represented tribal groups and members before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, the United Nations Working Group on Indigenous Peoples, the United States Supreme Court, and the Supreme Court of Canada. Professor Williams has served as Chief Justice for the Court of Appeals, Pascua Yaqui Indian Reservation, and as Justice for the Court of Appeals and trial judge pro tem for the Tohono O’odham Nation. He was named one of 2011’s “Heroes on the Hill” by Indian Country Today for his human rights advocacy work as Lead Counsel for the Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group of Canada before the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.

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Follow : “Make No Bones About It.”

Every Sunday from 4-6, on KAOS Radio 89.3 FM.
Both at Public Affairs and Music Show.