Tag Archives: Max Gail Jr.

Max Gail Jr on Make No Bones About It. Feb 14, 2016, 5pm

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Maxwell Trowbridge “Max” Gail, Jr.[1] (born April 5, 1943) is an American actor who has starred in stage, television, and film roles. He most notably portrayed the role of Detective Stan “Wojo” Wojciehowicz on the television sitcom Barney Miller.[2]

Life and career

Gail was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Mary Elizabeth (Scanlon) and Maxwell Trowbridge Gail, a businessman,[1] and he was raised in Grosse Ile, Michigan. He attended Williams College, and was later an instructor for the University Liggett School before becoming an actor. His acting debut came in 1970 for The Little Fox Theatre in San Francisco, California, playing Chief Bromden in the original stage production of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest. In 1973, he reprised this role in his New York stage debut.

He is best known for his television role as Det. Stan “Wojo” Wojoehowicz in the sitcom Barney Miller (1975-1982). Gail’s best known feature film role is in D.C. Cab (1983) as Harold, the owner of the D.C. Cab taxi company. He also directed several episodes of Barney Miller as Maxwell Gail.

In 1984, Gail was featured in the monodrama The Babe on Broadway. This stage play was filmed and later featured on PBS.

Gail has starred in other TV series including Whiz Kids (1983) as Llewellan Farley, Jr., an investigative reporter who is friends with a group of teenage computer hackers. He worked on the short-lived Normal Life (1990). He has appeared on the TV series Sons & Daughters (2006).

Gail has made many guest appearances on TV shows such as Cannon, Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman, Due South, The Streets of San Francisco, Paul Sand in Friends and Lovers, The Drew Carey Show, Quantum Leap, Psych, Gary Unmarried, NCIS (Episode “Murder 2.0”), “Longmire” -Episode 40, and Mad Men.

Gail appeared as Brooklyn Dodgers manager Burt Shotton in the 2013 film 42, a film about Jackie Robinson’s first two years as a member of the Dodgers organization, including his first year of playing at the Major League level in 1947.

Gail runs Full Circle, a production company which has featured documentaries on such subjects as Agent Orange, Native Americans, and nuclear issues.

Gail’s first wife, Willie Bier, died of cancer in 1986; they have a daughter, India. He and his second wife, Nan, have two children, Maxwell and Grace. Gail has a twin sister, actress Mary Gail.

Max Gail Jr. on the next “Make No Bones About It.” 8-10-2014 5pm

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Max Gail, Secretary of the Board, is a teacher, actor, musician and director and has a degree in Economics from Williams College and an MBA from the  University of Michigan.  Max has been involved in social and environmental  activism for the last 30 years.  He also founded Local Access Places (LAP), which  was SEE’s first project.

Back in 1980, portable video was very new and I had been playing a cop in the Barney Miller TV show and spending the rest of my time on the life learning curve with AIM (American Indian Movement) and MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy) activists. I felt there was a way to share the connectedness we humans have to each other and all of life that is expressed in the Lakota prayer Mitakuye Oyasin…”for all my relations.” Inspired by “on the road” story telling from Jack Kerouac to Charles Kuralt, and anticipating perhaps music videos and Real People/Real World TV, I collaborated with film makers, artists and activists to integrated audio video recording with our travels and gatherings throughout the year. I thought of it as a “docu-musical,” and called it “For All My Relations.” At the center were my two inspiring older brothers Floyd Red Crow Westerman and David Amram. A small piece of that video is in the wonderful film being premiered at the festival this year, “David Amram: The first 80 Years.” But it was all “too radical” for the ABC network at the time in a country that was swinging into the Reagan era.