Monthly Archives: February 2013

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Colleen Jollie visit with us on Make No Bones About It, March 17th, 2013, 4pm

Colleen Jollie visit with us on Make No Bones About It, March 17th, 2013, 4pm

Colleen Jollie earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Native American Studies and a Master’s degree in Public Administration, both from The Evergreen State College. She is a descendant of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa Tribe. Ms. Jollie worked to create the Longhouse Education and Cultural Center at Evergreen; she helped found the Potlatch Fund and the Northwest Native American Basketweavers Association. Whether creating a new building or an organization, Colleen gathers people together to bring out ideas and create new realities. She describes this as “getting everyone into one canoe and pulling together toward a common destination.” She was deputy director at the Governor’s Office of Indian Affairs and the Tribal Liaison at the Washington State Department of Transportation.

Sla Hal gathering& history with Marvin Kempf and Mark Johns-Colson. March 10th, 2013 at 4pm

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Sla-hal is tied to the people of this area, pre-Clovis, since time immemorial. The finding of the sla-hal bones with the mastodon bring the past to the present, justifying the oral tradition of the people of the Pacific Northwest. Sla-hal began as a game between the animals and the humans.

Learn more by tuning in to Make No Bones About It.

Robert Satiacum shares about American Indian Lobby Day 2013 on “Make No Bones About It.” March 10th, 2013 5:30pm

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Robert Satiacum is an enrolled member of the Puyallup Tribe of Indians. He is the son of the late Chief Bob Satiacum – widely known for his sacrifices made for sovereignty and fishing rights. Satiacum is immersed his native culture, and diligently practices the traditions of the Sweat Lodge, Native American Church, and the annual Tribal Journeys in his family canoe.

Save the date!

MARCH 13TH, 2013

Nancy Shippentower-Games on “Make No Bones About It.” March 3, 2013 4pm

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Nancy’s parents are Donald & Janet McCloud, we grew up on the banks of the Nisqually River, my father’s parents are Willie Frank & Angeline Tobin, my mother’s are Mamie McCoy & John Renecker – I have 7 siblings, 6 children and 10 grandchildren. I live in Yelm, WA., by my parents home..

Janet is a Tulalip Tribal Member, Don is a Puyallup Tribal member.

Nancy grew up in the fishing wars on both the Nisqually & Puyallup River – we seen, heard and felt the anger of the sportsmen, game agents and the state government.

Nancy graduated from college at Evergreen College under the direction of Mary Hilliare.

Nancy worked at the Puyallup Tribe off and on for over 30 years – I like Natural resources jobs,. Nancy has been on Tribal Council during the Land Claims Settlement.

Signed the Centennial Accord & Puyallup Tribal Land Claims.

Nancy is very vocal when it comes to telling the truth of the fishing rights, or protecting our natural resources.

Nancy said we were very luck our parents took us around d the United States to visit other nations, participate in their ceremonies and learn different traditions and cultures.

Treaty Rights at Risk with Ed Johnstone, on “Make No Bones About It.” Feb 24, 2013 4pm

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Ed Johnstone of the Quinault Indian Nation will share with us what is at risk for him.
To find out more about Treaty Rights at Risk, go to treatyrightsatrisk.org

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Raven Supports Goodthinking 4 All Our Relations

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Women Senators, Tribal Leader Discuss Importance of VAWA

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WA Senators have provided great leadership, as has Tulalip Vice-Chair Deborah Parker. Time for a thank you phone call, plus a call to your US Representative — their deliberation comes next. Pass VAWA with tribal provisions intact!

from Deborah Parker-
Attn. friends, family and VAWA supporters: We need your help! ON MONDAY, please call the Capitol switchboard at (202) 224-3121 and ask the operator to connect you to your Senator (or call as many key Senators as possible). When you’re connected to their offices, ask to speak to the staff person who handles VAWA. Tell
them:

“Today is an important day, the Senator has the chance to protect all women, including Native women. It’s time to be a hero and pass a comprehensive VAWA – S.47 – including the tribal provisions and I urge
the Senator to vote NO on the Coburn Amendment. I urge you to support the Murkowski and Leahy Amendments.”

THANK YOU for helping us advance the protections of Native women across the Country. Your support is appreciated.