Tag Archives: Remembering Wounded Knee

Alex White Plume on Make No Bones About It. Dec 27th, 2015 at 4pm

Alex White Plume

Alex White Plume

Lakota Activist Alex White Plume lives with his family and extended family on a 2,000-acre ranch near Wounded Knee Creek, SD. We will be visiting with Alex about the morning of December 29, 1890, Wound Knee Massacre and Big Foot Ride.  “The whole Sioux Nation was wounded at that last terrible massacre, and we’ve been suffering ever since. It’s true we have our own ways of healing ourselves from the genocidal wound, but there is just so much historical trauma, so much pain, so much death,” White Plume said, and he would know. It is time for us to just listen, thank you Alex White Plume for your willingness to share with us on KAOS Radio, this Sunday, Dec 27th, 2015 at 4pm. Tune in http://www.kaosradio.org

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Remembering Wounded Knee 12-29-1890

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One hundred and twenty-three winters ago, on December 29, 1890, some 150 Lakota men, women and children were massacred by the US 7th Calvary Regiment near Wounded Knee Creek on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. Some estimate the actual number closer to 300.

The Wounded Knee Massacre is when most American history books
drop American Indians from history.

Snowfall was heavy that December week. The Lakota ancestors killed that day were left in brutal frigid wintry plains of the reservation before a burial party came to bury them in one mass grave. The photograph of Big Foot’s frozen and contorted body is a symbol for all American Indians of what happened to our ancestors.

Some of those who survived were eventually taken to the Episcopal mission in Pine Ridge. Eventually, some of them were able to give an oral history of what happened. One poignant fact of the massacre has remained in my mind since first reading it, and every time I think about Wounded Knee, I remember this:

“It was the fourth day after Christmas in the Year of Our Lord 1890. When the first torn and bleeding bodies were carried into the candlelit church, those who were conscious could see Christmas greenery hanging from the open rafters. Across the chancel front above the pulpit was strung a crudely lettered banner: “Peace on earth, good will to men,”

writes Dee Brown in “Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.”

There was no peace on earth for the Lakota four days after Christmas. No wonder so many American Indians question the validity of Christianity.

Later, as absurd as it may sound, some 20 soldiers were given the Medal of Honor – for killing innocent Lakota men, women and children.

The Wounded Knee Massacre is a symbol for all American Indians of what happened to our ancestors.

History records the Wounded Knee Massacre was the last battle of the American Indian war. Unfortunately, it is when most American history books drop American Indians from history, as if well.

Fortunately, American Indians have survived – one generation after another – since Wounded Knee. It is for us who remain to remember our ancestors as we make for a better life for those we encounter today. We are also taught to prepare for the next seven generations, but as we do, we must remember our ancestors.

Today, we remember those ancestors lost on this date in history 122 winters ago.

posted December 29, 2012 6:00 am est

http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/wounded-knee-massacre-122-years-ago-today-we-remember-those-lost.html

Alex White Plume on Make No Bones About It, 12-29-2013 at 4pm

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ALEX WHITE PLUME is Oglala Lakota and one of the founders of the Sitanka Wokiksuye (Wounded Knee Bigfoot Memorial Ride) (South Dakota) started in 1986. The nation needed a Wiping of the Tears ceremony after the massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890. The ride began because of the way our people were living; they needed change and a way that brought awareness to what happened to Bigfoot and his people at Wounded Knee. “MOTHER EARTH NEEDS CULTURE.” – Alex WP

To see some of Alex s work go to (www.oweakuinternational.org).

Between 1986-1990, the ride was a Wiping of the Tears ceremony for the Lakota nation. There were 19 riders on the very first ride in 1986 from Bridger, SD to Wounded Knee, SD. The ride was called the Future Generation Ride after 1990, when the Wiping of the Tears ceremony ended.

For the week of Dec. 26, 2013 – January 2, 2014

Remembering Wounded Knee

Lost Bird of Wounded Knee Video