Daily Archives: May 28, 2013

Valerie Segrest shares about Native foods, healthy systems, and how to live from the Earth as our ancestors did. June 2, 2013 at 4pm

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Valerie Segrest is an enrolled member of the Muckleshoot Indian Tribe and works as the Community Nutritionist and Native Foods Educator for the Northwest Indian College’s Cooperative Extension Department. As an independent, creative and outspoken American Indian woman, she has developed a new perspective in addressing issues of health and social justice for indigenous peoples. Her goal is to restore health and well being to her tribe and other Native communities by combining traditional Native food and plant knowledge with modern scientific findings. While studying to be a clinical nutritionist, Valerie began to deepen her awareness and knowledge of the gifts of her Native ancestors. She became less interested in talking about calorie counting, carbohydrates, and protein intake and more driven to get people connected with the source of their foods. Now, Valerie is committed to creating culturally appropriate health systems in tribal communities and exemplifies dedication to tribal wellness through community-based research that impacts health disparities. In 2009, she co-authored the book “Feeding the People, Feeding the Spirit: Revitalizing Northwest Coastal Indian Food Culture” which has become a tribute to the movement among tribal people in Western Washington to improve individual, family and community wellness through revitalizing their traditional foods. From this book, Valerie has developed a basic nutrition curriculum entitled “Honor the Gift of Food” that empowers students to develop their own healthy eating behaviors through sharing modern approaches to a traditional foods diet. She also creates and designs community gardens as well as researches and writes a monthly column for her blog and community newspaper on local and wild foods of the Pacific Northwest. In years to come, Valerie will work as the coordinator of the Muckleshoot Food Sovereignty Project to collectively develop innovative and effective ways to build community food security through exploring tribal food assets and access to local and healthy foods.

http://foodandcommunityfellows.org/fellow/valerie-segrest

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Chief Arvol Looking Horse on Make No Bones About It.

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Santa Ynez, California

“All Nations, All Faiths, One Prayer”

June 20, 21, 22 & 23 2013

World Peace and Prayer Day—also known as, Honoring Sacred Sites Day, was envisioned and brought forth by Chief Looking Horse as a day to join worldwide communities and people of all races, ages, genders, and faiths, who share concern for the welfare of the Earth and humanity. Honoring-ceremonies, invocation and prayer are observed in collaboration with local indigenous representatives. Special guest speakers, wisdom keepers and activists of all denominations share spiritual insight and discuss important environmental concerns and cures—on both a local and global level. This profoundly auspicious time is elevated by a cross-cultural celebration of music, dance, and storytelling.

All are welcome at no cost, but donations are greatly appreciated!

With the blessing of the Santa Ynez Chumash Elders and guidance of Chief Arvol Looking Horse — 19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Pipe Bundle and recognized spiritual leader of the Lakota, Dakota and Nakota Sioux Nations.

Unity through prayer. We have come to a crossroads in our evolution on this planet, when it is vital, despite our differences, to unify our minds and hearts for the well being of all. For this reason World Peace and Prayer Day has traveled around the world to actively bring people together – drawing attention to the relevance of sacred sites in this 21st century. This year, WPPD is honored to be hosted by the community of Santa Ynez and Ojai Valley, and indigenous Chumash representatives of the region, including Ojai’s own Living Treasure, story teller, advisor, wisdom-keeper and Chairperson for the Barbareno/Ventureno Band of Mission Indians…

Julie Tumamait-Stenslie

Julie’s Chumash heritage is linked to at least 11 known Chumash villages and has been traced back as far as the mid-18th Century. She proudly carries on the tradition and culture of her family and follows in her father Vincent Tumamait’s footsteps in continuing to educate and protect the Chumash Cultural Heritage.

World Peace & Prayer Days Events

June 20, 21, 22 & 23 – World Peace & Prayer Days. Live Oak Campground. Santa Ynez. The Sacred Fire is the heart of World Peace and Prayer Day. It will be lit on the morning of June 20th and honored over four days, with a special ceremonial emphasis – following traditional Lakota Sioux ways, on Summer Solstice, Friday June 21. As the sacred fire burns there will be a time when everyone is invited to offer tobacco and prayers to the fire. This prayerful Summer Solstice Day will be followed by the sharing of wisdom keepers and speakers, joining us from far and wide. Saturday June 22, the celebrations will continue with Earth and animal awareness activities, talking circles, storytelling, more speakers and shared feasts. All activities and events are offered at no cost to all. This includes camping at the Live Oak Campground on the evenings of June 20, 21 and 22. Shared meals will be provided on Friday and Saturday. Please bring food to cook and share!

*Note: This is an alcohol and drug free event.

June 23 – Honoring Sacred Sites. Acknowledged by all Nations around the world as places holding unique geographical, spiritual, historical and often mythological significance. These places of worship—intended to unite people in peace, can all too easily become a source of power struggle, greed and environmental abuse. It is by no coincidence that places where the Earth vibrates with magnified energy, also commonly align with rich pockets of Earth’s greatest natural resources. Therefore, the importance of protecting sacred sites and educating people about the value of restoring them to balance, reaches beyond the realm of spiritual ideals and directly into the impact their restoration has, on the health of the environment. Chief Looking Horse will be visiting some of the sacred sites of the area on Sunday the 23rd, performing ceremony to cleanse the lands.

HELP SUPPORT THIS SACRED WORK
http://worldpeaceandprayerday.com/donations/