Monthly Archives: June 2014

Ed Johnstone visits with Raven on 6/29/2014 at 5pm

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Ed Johnstone

Ed Johnstone is being honored as a Champion of Change for his efforts as a Community Resilience Leader.


I am a Fisheries Policy Representative for the Quinault Indian Nation, a land of cliff-lined beaches on the Pacific Ocean, evergreen forests, rivers, lakes, and mountains. We fish the same waters and hunt the same lands our ancestors did thousands of years before people from other parts of the world ever came here. We meld our traditions and legacies with technological innovations and provide new opportunities for our hard-working people; however, we always maintain environmental stewardship and sustainability at the forefront of our priorities and spiritual connection.

The Quinault Nation seeks every opportunity to merge our efforts with those of other governments as well as other people from all walks of life as long as they demonstrate respect for our history, our sovereignty and our land, our treaty-protected rights, and the rights of future generations to inherit a healthy world. Economic prosperity and gainful employment are congruent with these things, as long as care, cultural sensitivity, and wise, long term decision-making are the primary considerations in management planning and implementation. Because of this, I gladly accept the honor of being named a “Champion of Change” because – as you know- change is mandatory.

It is important for other Americans to understand the perspective of Native Americans—to learn from it and hopefully adopt elements of it in their own lives. We have lived here a very long time. Survival and adaptation are concepts we Indians know very well. We breathe the same air and walk on the same land as other Americans. We drink the same water. We share a common future. In the long run, humanity will either prosper, or perish, together. Climate change is a major anthropogenic environmental concern, which affects Tribes directly. It has already had major impacts on our lands, causing massive fish kills and transmigrations through hypoxia and ocean-warming, intensified storms and flooding, glacial melting and expanded droughts, eroded beaches and invasive species.

Quinault Nation and other indigenous nations have been responding to climate change for years, and the need to support us in our efforts as well as work with us in a team effort to deal with this issue, as effectively as possible, is absolute. I was proud to the co-chair First Stewards, a non-profit organization which presented a major climate change summit at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC this past summer, and which will continue to bring indigenous people for the U.S. and American territories together over climate issues in the years to come. I am currently treasurer of First Stewards. For more information on this program, please visit our website at www.firststewards.org.

I have worked in the timber and fishing industries of the Quinault Indian Nation most of my life. I am a two-term Quinault Councilman, serving from 1996-2002, and serve as treasurer of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. I also chair the Intergovernmental Policy Council, a forum of tribal and state co-managers of the ocean area that includes the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary.

Edward Johnstone serves as the Quinault Indian Nation Policy Spokesperson on all issues regarding ocean policy and treaty fishing rights

Feds weigh in on DC NFL team’s name – President Brian Cladoosby

Federal officials canceled trademarks protecting the DC NFL team name. National Congress of American Indians president Brian Cladoosby joins Ari Melber.

WASHINGTON_ Tribes want Congress to ban Redskins’ trademark _ National _ McC

The team and NFL should change the Redskins name, not the federal government

Sen. Maria Cantwell tells NFL_ Redskins’ name ‘insult,’ ‘racial slur,’ must

Original Pechanga’s Blog_ NCAI’s CLADOOSBY on WASHINGTON REDSKINS_SNYDER FOU

 

Swil Kanim on Make No Bones About It. – June 22, 2014 at 4pm

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Swil Kanim, a classically trained violinist, native storyteller and actor, is a member of the Lummi Nation. He was born on November 11, 1961 in Seattle, Washington and grew up in the Bellingham, Washington area.

As a young boy, he was separated from his parents and spent the remainder of his childhood in foster homes. One of his teachers encouraged him to enroll in a music program, and the violin became his music instrument of choice. Through music, he found his path to healing childhood wounds and reconnect to his native roots.

Because of his unique ability to inspire audiences to express themselves honorably, Swil Kanim is a sought-after keynote speaker for conferences, workshops, school assemblies, and rehabilitation centers.

He travels extensively throughout the United States, enchanting audiences with his original composition music and native storytelling. His workshops, The Elements of Honor, are attended by people from all walks of life.

Swil Kanim’s compositions incorporate classical influences as well as musical interpretations of his journey from depression and despair to spiritual and emotional freedom. The music and stories that emerge from his experiences have been transforming people’s lives for decades.

During a recent interview, Swil Kanim said the following about the “Works for the People” CD: “I played each piece of the album as if it was the only chance I had to record it. I was striving for the perfection in the moment rather than perfection in the eternal recording. I wanted to create that feeling that I was playing for the individual listener. Rather than have an album of individual pieces, I would try to tie each track together considering the energy level of the preceding and following piece and the last piece with the first piece.”

http://www.swilkanim.com/bio/

Ta’Kaiya Blaney shares her heart on “Make No Bones About It.” at 5:30pm on 6/15/2014

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12 year old Ta’Kaiya Blaney is Sliammon First Nation from B.C., Canada. Along with singing, songwriting, and acting, she is concerned about the environment, especially the preservation of marine and coastal wildlife. She travels and speaks on protecting indigenous lands worldwide from unsustainable development.

 

More about Ta’Kaiya Blaney

Chief Phil Lane Jr. visits with Raven at 5pm on 6/15/2014

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Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First Nations and is an internationally recognized leader in human and community development. He was born at the Haskell Indian School in Lawrence, Kansas in 1944, where his mother and father met and attended school.
During the past 45 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North, Central and South America, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Education at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada (1980-1996). With Elder’s from across North America Phil co-founded the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) in 1982. FWII became an independent Institute in 1995. As well, Phil is a Director of the Four Directions Corporation, an Indigenous owned company, incorporated in 1996’ as Four World’s economic development arm.
With Phil’s guidance and applied experience, FWII has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development. Four Directions’ is the Institute’s economic development arm. It is dedicated to the development of sustainable economic enterprises that support holistic, political, social, cultural, environmental, and educational development.

In 1977, Phil was named a Modern Indian Sports Great by the National Indian Magazine, Wassaja, for his record-breaking accomplishments in Track and Wrestling. He has extensive experience in his own cultural traditions, is an award winning author and film producer and holds Master’s Degrees in Education and Public Administration. His film credits include the National Public Television series “Images of Indians” with the late Will Sampson, “Walking With Grandfather”, “The Honor of All: The Story of Alkali Lake” and “Healing the Hurts” and “Shift of the Ages (SOTA)” released in December, 2012. In January, 2013 SOTA won the Jury Prize for Best Documentary at the World Interfaith Harmony Film Festival, in April, 2013 SOTA won the Audience Choice for Best Documentary at the Riverside International Film Festival and was the Official Selection at the Sedona International Film Festival in February, 2013 and the Black Hills International Film Festival in May, 2013.

In August, 1992, Phil was the first Indigenous person to win the prestigious Windstar Award, presented annually by the late John Denver and the Windstar Foundation to a global citizen whose personal and professional life exemplifies commitment to a global perspective, operates with awareness of the spiritual dimension of human existence and demonstrates concrete actions of the benefit for humans and all living systems of the Earth. At this International event, in recognition of his lineage and long time service to Indigenous peoples and the human family, Indigenous Elders from across North America recognized Phil as a Hereditary Chief through a Traditional Headdress Ceremony.

On November 11, 2000, Phil received the Year 2000 award from the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights in Berne, Switzerland. Phil is the first North or South American person to receive the award. This award was given in recognition of Phil’s “unique contributions to improve the lives and future hopes of Indigenous populations. It is primarily based on his most special merits of promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity rather than opposing oppression directly and, as well, for his international visionary initiatives among Indigenous populations by healing the root causes of hopelessness and despair.”

Other winners of these prestigious awards include, Oceanologist Jacques-Yves Cousteau, David Brower, Yevgeni Velikhov, Vice President of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Winner and founder of Kenya’s Greenbelt Movement, Lester Brown, President of the World Watch Institute, the Dalai Lama of Tibet, Dr. Boutros Boutros Ghali, former Secretary General of the United Nations, and British Lord Yehudi Menuhin, musician and philosopher.

On June 21, 2008, Phil was awarded the 14th Annual Ally Award by the Center for Healing Racism in Houston, Texas. The Ally Award is an annual award presented by the Houston-based Center for the Healing of Racism to honor the achievements of those who have worked hard to achieve harmony of all ethnic and cultural groups. Phil received the Ally Award for his national and international work in promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity that focuses on healing the root causes of racism and oppression rather than focusing on conflict. Special emphasis on this award is for Lane’s dedicated work, for more than nineteen years, as one of the primary leaders in the resolution of Canada’s Residential School issue, which involved the sexual, physical, cultural, psychological, and emotional abuse of thousands of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada.

This effort resulted in a $3.5 Billion settlement for Residential School survivors, a full public apology by the Prime Minister of Canada and all Political Party Leaders on the floor of the Canadian Parliament, the establishment of a $500 million Aboriginal Healing Foundation and a formal, five year, Truth and Reconciliation Commission that is currently holding public hearings across Canada on the impact of the Residential Schools on the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada.
In 2008, Phil completed a three-year tenure as CEO of the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF) in Seattle, Washington. The Foundation’s achievements include the launching of the first-ever Native American Film Festival, the development of a host of innovative education programs ranging from elementary and high school curriculum design and development, to adult education, early childhood education, and the recent launching of a $3.5 million holistic poverty-alleviation program model for urban Indigenous Peoples in Seattle.

Phil has now stepped into further global leadership as Chairman of the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) and Four Directions International. The Institute’s central initiative since 2009 is the promotion of Deep Social Networks and The Digital Fourth Way. The focus of The Fourth Way is contributing to the unification of the Human Family by co-creating community-based, culturally-respectful, principal-centered strategies and programming that transcends assimilation, resignation, and conflict. This work uses digital communications technologies for local, regional and large scale change by collectively addressing related challenges such as the Alberta Tars Sands and other issues impacting the health and well-being of the Human Family, Mother Earth and the future of our younger generations.

Deep Social Networks (DSN) are principle-centered, collaboratively created and community-based digital networks with purpose for uplifting education, harmonious development, child protection, social and environmental justice, such as the Alberta Tar Sands and unifying Indigenous Peoples and marginalized, underserved communities in the Americas in harmony with the Reunion of the Condor and Eagle.

On June 9, 2013 the Four Worlds Foundation has been officially opened at the City of Knowledge located at the former Clayton Military Base in the Panama Canal Zone, Panama. The Four Worlds Foundation in Panama will be the International Training Center and Digital DSN Hub for actualizing the Reunion of the Condor and Eagle via the Fourth Way across the Americas and beyond!

Bio of Phil Lnae Jr

World Wisdom- Chief Arvol Looking Horse

Focused on collaboration

Ongoing collaboration between stakeholders is essential to creating meaningful dialogue on environmental protections and sustainable forestry.

Private forest landowners are committed to working in partnership with stakeholders, including tribes and conservation groups, to uphold and exceed the objectives of the Forests & Fish Law. Ongoing collaboration between stakeholders is essential to creating meaningful dialogue on environmental protections and sustainable forestry.

Here is an example of the collaboration and partnerships taking place between the private forest industry, tribes and conservationists in extension of the Forests & Fish Law.

Forest and Fish

Washington Forest Protection Association — One Voice Blog