Tag Archives: Native Storyteller

Joseph Marshall III on “Make No Bones About It.” 9-11-2011 5pm

Joseph Marshall III
Biography

Joseph Marshall III was born and raised on the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation and is an enrolled member of the Sicangu Lakota (Rosebud Sioux) tribe. Because he was raised in a traditional Lakota household by his maternal grandparents, his first language is Lakota. In that environment he also learned the ancient tradition of oral storytelling.
Joseph taught at the high school and college levels, and developed native studies curriculum as well. For several years he worked for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Now he writes full time, having published nine nonfiction works, three novels, a collection of short stories and essays, and has written several screenplays. Many of his books are published in foreign countries, including France, Germany, Italy, Bulgaria, Korea, China, Japan, Romania, Brazil, Spain, and Israel. Joseph has won several awards for his books, both for the text and audio versions.

Due for publication in 2012 are Returning to the Lakota Way: Old Values to Save the Modern Work, from Hay House, a sequel to the very popular The Lakota Way: Stories and Lessons for Living; and Life Lessons from the Bow and Arrow (working title) from Sounds True.

Joseph has appeared in several television documentaries, served as technical advisor for movies, and had a role in a major television network mini-series. He was a technical advisor and narrator for the Turner Network Television (TNT) and Dreamworks Television six-part mini-series Into the West, as well as playing the on-screen role of “Loved by the Buffalo,” a Lakota medicine man. He is also a practitioner of primitive Lakota archery, having learned from his maternal grandfather the art of hand crafting bows and arrows. Joseph is also a specialist in wilderness survival.

One of his most treasured and meaningful experiences was to be one of the founders of Sinte Gleska University (1971) on the Rosebud Reservation. He is one of the Charter Board Members.

As a speaker and lecturer he as appeared in many venues throughout the United States and in countries such as France, Sweden, and Siberia.

Joseph and his wife Connie (also his literary agent and manger) are the parents of a blended family of nine, and have sixteen grandchildren.

Joesph Marshall III

The Magic of Swil Kanim on KAOS 89.3 FM

Sunday, December 5 · 5:00pm – 6:00pm Tune in with Raven and his guest Swil Kanim. Swil Kanim is a violinist and member of the Lummi Nation, located in Washington state. Learn more about his music, and hear some of his stories that transformed people and their lives for decades.

Swil Kanim has been featured on KIRO TV NEWS, National Public Radio’s Earth on the Air, Northwest Public Radio, NW Cable News Network and the Canadian Chum Network’s New Canoe.

In addition t…o working in 24 episodes of CBS’s Northern Exposure, his music and acting ability were highlighted by starring in Sherman Alexie’s critically acclaimed The Business of FancyDancing.

He was selected to perform as part of the Bellingham’s Sister City Program in Teteyama, Japan where he continued on to Seoul, Korea for a memorial/reunion concert for orphans of the Korean Conflict.

The Indigo Girls asked Swil Kanim to be their opening act in Seattle to kick off the Honor the Earth Concert tour of North America.

Swil Kanim also performed for five years with the Growth and Prevention Theater Company (GAP Theater), based out of Seattle. The GAP Theater Company presented professional plays about racism and varying forms of bigotry for institutions across the Great Northwest.

He has done school assemblies for elementary and secondary education in Washington State, British Columbia, Canada, and in Sitka Alaska.

He has performed for the staff and participants of Re-habilitation Centers across the state of Washington.

At the American Indian Film Awards in San Francisco, Swil Kanim has been a featured performer since 2003 , he was featured on the soundtrack of a documentary about Indian Boarding Schools, which won the Best Documentary award.

Swil Kanim has received the Certificate of Virtuosity from the Whatcom Chapter
of the Washington State Music Teachers Association, the Bellingham Municipal Arts Award for Promoting Self-Expression in Community, and Woodring College of Education Professional Excellence Award.

In 2004, 2007 and 2008 he performed with Classical Guitarist Andre Feriante and Cellist Paulo Cesar at Benaroya Recital Hall in Seattle, WA

Swil Kanim has collaborated with Pianist David Lanz and Flutist Gary Stroutsos on two CD’s; Spirit Romance and Heart of the Bitterroot.

In April, 2008 Swil Kanim performed at the West Coast American Indian Music Awards where he was presented with both the Classic Award and Traditional Instrument Award. Also in April of 2008, Swil Kanim was invited to perform for the Dalai Lama at Key Arena in Seattle for The Seeds of Compassion event.

November 2008 Swil Kanim performed four “sold out” shows at the Smithsonian’s Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC..

check out his website:
http://www.swilkanim.net/

An Evening with Che oke’ ten (Paul Wagner)

Sunday, November 21 · 5:00pm – 6:00pm Join Raven and his guest Che oke’ ten as Raven finds out about Che oke’ ten concert tour in Japan and his solo flute CD (journey of the spirit) that won the 2009 JPF National music award for best Native American Album.

More on Che oke’ ten
Che oke’ ten (Paul Wagner), Native American flutist, drummer/singer and storyteller of the Saanich (Coast Salish) tribe, shares the beautiful songs and stories of his ancient northwest coast …Sissiwiss (“sacred breath”/”sacred life”) spirituality, in cultural presentations and ritual and public performances, in the United States and abroad. Based out of Seattle, Washington, Che oke’ ten has worked with some of the Pacific Northwest’s great artists such as Eyvind Kang, Bill Frisell, Gina Sala and Johnny Moses.

Che oke’ ten comes from a lineage of Shneh’em, medicine people who have dedicated their lives to healing work using many tools, including music. He continues this work through traditional sound healing and ritual performance.

Che oke’ ten’s Native American flute songs have come to him with visions of healing and prayer for all relations (tree people, animal people, human people). He believes music comes to us directly from Spirit; leaving yourself open to Spirit is the way; asking for the gifts to come so we can gift the music to those who need such blessing

An Evening with Native American Storyteller Gayle Ross

Sunday, November 14 · 5:00pm – 6:00pm An Evening with Native American Storyteller Gayle Ross on “Make No Bones About It.”

Join Raven and his guest Gayle Ross as she shares the tradition of storytelling with us all. Through her stories comes messages for the people about treating their environment and each other with respect, and love.


About Gayle Ross
Gayle is a descendent of John Ross, principal chief of the Cherokee Nation during and after the infamous “Trail of Tears,” the forced removal of many Southeastern Indians to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) in the late 1830s. Her grandmother told stories and it is from this rich heritage that Gayle’s storytelling springs. During the past twenty years, she has become one of the most respected storytellers to emerge from the current surge of interest in this timeless art form.

Gayle has appeared at most major storytelling and folk festivals in the United States and Canada, and in concert halls and theaters throughout the US and Europe, often appearing with some of today’s finest Native American musicians and dancers. She is in demand as a lecturer and visiting artist at college campuses and she continues to mesmerize children at schools and libraries across the country. The National Council for the Traditional Arts has included Gayle in two of their touring shows, “Master Storytellers” and the all-Indian show, “From the Plains to the Pueblos.” She was invited by Vice President Al Gore to perform at a gala at his residence entitled “A Taste of Tennessee” and was the only Native American speaker chosen by the White House to appear in the “Millennium on the Mall” celebration in Washington, DC. Gayle, who has published several of her stories in illustrated books, has spoken at meetings of the American Library Association, the International Reading Association, and the International Board of Books for Young People. She was a commentator in the Discovery Channel’s award-winning documentary, “How the West Was Lost,” and her stories have been featured on the National Public Radio programs “Living on the Earth” and “Mountain Stage.”

Gerald Barnes was born in Pleasant Point, Perry, Maine and now lives in Virginia. As a child he learned traditional Passamaquoddy basket weaving from his mother and father. To make his work unique, he developed the turtle as his personal symbol. For Barnes the turtle represents longevity and sustenance but, more importantly, these slightly imperfect turtles represent the adverse effects of pollution on the environment.

RESOURCES
Books by Gayle Ross
How Rabbit Tricked Otter and other Cherokee Trickster Stories.
New York: HarperCollins, 1994.
How the Turtle’s Back Was Cracked: A Traditional Cherokee Tale.
New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1995.
The Legend of Windigo: A Tale from Native North America.
Dial Books for Young Readers, 1996.

Anthologies including stories by Gayle Ross
Bruchac, Joseph. The Girl Who Married the Moon.
Mahwah, N.J.: Troll Communications, 1994.
The Story of the Milky Way: A Cherokee Tale.
New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1995.

Established in 1989 through an Act of Congress, the National Museum of the American Indian is an institution of living cultures dedicated to the life, languages, literature, history, and arts of the Native peoples of the Western Hemisphere. The museum includes the George Gustav Heye Center, a permanent exhibition and education facility in New York City, and the Cultural Resources Center, a research and collection facility in Suitland, Maryland. A new museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., is now under construction and will open in September 2004.

For additional information on the National Museum of the American Indian visit the museum’s Website at www.AmericanIndian.si.edu.
http://www.indiancountrytoday.com/opinion/34736534.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kynbb7ba1tA

Evening with Roderick Harris

Join Raven and his guest Roderick Jimmy, of the Nooksack Tribe, has been performing and composing since childhood. Roderick’s mother, Vera Harris, her native name being Sotia, had a profound influence on Roderick’s musical development. His first CD, entitled: Sotia’s Love, was released in 2002. Roderick is also a classically trained pianist and has performed in numerous venues, including the Seattle Opera House. Roderick is one of the most talented Native American wood flute players in the Northwest. His style encompasses a range of music from Native American, Church, chants, to more contemporary sounds. Currently, he is working on his second CD, Yellow Cedars Pride and Joy, which will be dedicated to his father, Tom Harris. In his free time, Roderick teaches moccasin making.

You are invited to an evening with Robert Greygrass

Join Raven and his guest Robert Greygrass on Sunday, 1.17.2010 on KAOS 89.3 fm radio. Tune in at 5 pm!

Come join Raven and his guest Robert Greygrass. Robert’s name in Lakota is Tagniokikpeensi. I’m Lakota, talagee, French and Irish.

Robert Owens-Greygrass ; published writer, storyteller, actor, and wellness consultant, working internationally for 15 years. An incredible polio survivor in ways physically “normal” people don’t do, he has been called by some, the poster boy for disabled persons.

He is a company member with Native Voices at the Autry, appearing on stage with them many times and has toured internationally with the Native Voices show Salvage.

From 1995 to 1996, on stage with the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) 1996-97 on school tour for OSF.

Greygrass’ corporation, D’White Dog Productions LLC, keeps him touring, with his unique style to countless Schools, festivals, universities, the United Nations, prisons, and theaters. Hecontinues to produce and tour his two original one-man plays, Walking on Turtle Island and Ghost-lands of an Urban NDN, which both received critical acclaim in 2005, in Los Angeles.

In 2008 Robert wrote, starred and executive produced his 20 minute short film pilot, “Walking on Turtle Island”. Which had it’s premier as an official selection at the Ashland independent film Festival in April 2009.
Also a comedian Robert has hit some stages in L A, such as the Improv on Melrose, the Ice House, Smiles, and is hitting the college circuit with his sharp hysterical new show; “ Scalped…! What’s in my Head.”

RobertGreygrass@midwesttalent.com

http://www.walkingonturtleislandthemovie.com

http://www.turtleislandstorytellers.net/tis_oregon/transcript_r_greygrass.htm