Tag Archives: Native Storyteller

An Evening with Native American Storyteller Gayle Ross

Sunday, November 14 · 5:00pm – 6:00pm An Evening with Native American Storyteller Gayle Ross on “Make No Bones About It.”

Join Raven and his guest Gayle Ross as she shares the tradition of storytelling with us all. Through her stories comes messages for the people about treating their environment and each other with respect, and love.


About Gayle Ross
Gayle is a descendent of John Ross, principal chief of the Cherokee Nation during and after the infamous “Trail of Tears,” the forced removal of many Southeastern Indians to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) in the late 1830s. Her grandmother told stories and it is from this rich heritage that Gayle’s storytelling springs. During the past twenty years, she has become one of the most respected storytellers to emerge from the current surge of interest in this timeless art form.

Gayle has appeared at most major storytelling and folk festivals in the United States and Canada, and in concert halls and theaters throughout the US and Europe, often appearing with some of today’s finest Native American musicians and dancers. She is in demand as a lecturer and visiting artist at college campuses and she continues to mesmerize children at schools and libraries across the country. The National Council for the Traditional Arts has included Gayle in two of their touring shows, “Master Storytellers” and the all-Indian show, “From the Plains to the Pueblos.” She was invited by Vice President Al Gore to perform at a gala at his residence entitled “A Taste of Tennessee” and was the only Native American speaker chosen by the White House to appear in the “Millennium on the Mall” celebration in Washington, DC. Gayle, who has published several of her stories in illustrated books, has spoken at meetings of the American Library Association, the International Reading Association, and the International Board of Books for Young People. She was a commentator in the Discovery Channel’s award-winning documentary, “How the West Was Lost,” and her stories have been featured on the National Public Radio programs “Living on the Earth” and “Mountain Stage.”

Gerald Barnes was born in Pleasant Point, Perry, Maine and now lives in Virginia. As a child he learned traditional Passamaquoddy basket weaving from his mother and father. To make his work unique, he developed the turtle as his personal symbol. For Barnes the turtle represents longevity and sustenance but, more importantly, these slightly imperfect turtles represent the adverse effects of pollution on the environment.

RESOURCES
Books by Gayle Ross
How Rabbit Tricked Otter and other Cherokee Trickster Stories.
New York: HarperCollins, 1994.
How the Turtle’s Back Was Cracked: A Traditional Cherokee Tale.
New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1995.
The Legend of Windigo: A Tale from Native North America.
Dial Books for Young Readers, 1996.

Anthologies including stories by Gayle Ross
Bruchac, Joseph. The Girl Who Married the Moon.
Mahwah, N.J.: Troll Communications, 1994.
The Story of the Milky Way: A Cherokee Tale.
New York: Dial Books for Young Readers, 1995.

Established in 1989 through an Act of Congress, the National Museum of the American Indian is an institution of living cultures dedicated to the life, languages, literature, history, and arts of the Native peoples of the Western Hemisphere. The museum includes the George Gustav Heye Center, a permanent exhibition and education facility in New York City, and the Cultural Resources Center, a research and collection facility in Suitland, Maryland. A new museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., is now under construction and will open in September 2004.

For additional information on the National Museum of the American Indian visit the museum’s Website at www.AmericanIndian.si.edu.
http://www.indiancountrytoday.com/opinion/34736534.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kynbb7ba1tA

Evening with Roderick Harris

Join Raven and his guest Roderick Jimmy, of the Nooksack Tribe, has been performing and composing since childhood. Roderick’s mother, Vera Harris, her native name being Sotia, had a profound influence on Roderick’s musical development. His first CD, entitled: Sotia’s Love, was released in 2002. Roderick is also a classically trained pianist and has performed in numerous venues, including the Seattle Opera House. Roderick is one of the most talented Native American wood flute players in the Northwest. His style encompasses a range of music from Native American, Church, chants, to more contemporary sounds. Currently, he is working on his second CD, Yellow Cedars Pride and Joy, which will be dedicated to his father, Tom Harris. In his free time, Roderick teaches moccasin making.

You are invited to an evening with Robert Greygrass

Join Raven and his guest Robert Greygrass on Sunday, 1.17.2010 on KAOS 89.3 fm radio. Tune in at 5 pm!

Come join Raven and his guest Robert Greygrass. Robert’s name in Lakota is Tagniokikpeensi. I’m Lakota, talagee, French and Irish.

Robert Owens-Greygrass ; published writer, storyteller, actor, and wellness consultant, working internationally for 15 years. An incredible polio survivor in ways physically “normal” people don’t do, he has been called by some, the poster boy for disabled persons.

He is a company member with Native Voices at the Autry, appearing on stage with them many times and has toured internationally with the Native Voices show Salvage.

From 1995 to 1996, on stage with the Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) 1996-97 on school tour for OSF.

Greygrass’ corporation, D’White Dog Productions LLC, keeps him touring, with his unique style to countless Schools, festivals, universities, the United Nations, prisons, and theaters. Hecontinues to produce and tour his two original one-man plays, Walking on Turtle Island and Ghost-lands of an Urban NDN, which both received critical acclaim in 2005, in Los Angeles.

In 2008 Robert wrote, starred and executive produced his 20 minute short film pilot, “Walking on Turtle Island”. Which had it’s premier as an official selection at the Ashland independent film Festival in April 2009.
Also a comedian Robert has hit some stages in L A, such as the Improv on Melrose, the Ice House, Smiles, and is hitting the college circuit with his sharp hysterical new show; “ Scalped…! What’s in my Head.”

RobertGreygrass@midwesttalent.com

http://www.walkingonturtleislandthemovie.com

http://www.turtleislandstorytellers.net/tis_oregon/transcript_r_greygrass.htm