Monthly Archives: February 2014

Water of life – Mini Wic’oni

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My heart is heavy, the Water of life – Mini Wic’oni is speaking to us through our ceremonies and many people having dreams. As I hear the Voices standing up against the destruction of Grandmother Earth, I realize we need stand in Unity to protect the Water of Life. The Gulf spill is still leaking, the biggest cancer on the face of the earth – Tar Sands, the black snake of the Pipelines to carry this cancer, giant dams, the underground spider webs of Fracking that can trigger giant shifts in the earth and the radiation of Fukashima spilling around Grandmother Earth in a silent blanket. We have no choice, because our Global communities are standing up stating “I will put my life on the line, because I will die anyway”. 

My Grandmother told me of a time when water would be like gold, like many others heard in their young lives. Slowly these Prophecies came into our lives, we didn’t pay attention in our young days – because our back yards were not affected, back then it was the mining and farmers spraying chemicals. Even Countries that don’t use or want the pollution are now going to be affected, because now the poisons have become a Global giant destroying our sacred water. People are scrambling to find good water that is nowhere to be found in their communities. Our way of life through prayer is to prevent such hurtful disasters on behalf of our future generations; it is our responsibility. I ask all the Voices to stand together at this time in Unity. My prayers continue for all of you bringing attention to these Global Giants affecting us all as a whole and for the Global Giants to pay attention to their own children’s future. 

In a Sacred Hoop of Life, where there is no ending and no beginning!

Ana-h’opta po
Hear my words!

Chief Arvol Looking Horse
19th Generation Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle

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Please join us in welcoming Brian Cladoosby on Wednesday February 26, 2014 at the Longhouse 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

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Brian Cladoosby, NCAI President

Brian Cladoosby serves as the 21st President of NCAI.  In October 2013 at NCAI’s 71st Annual Convention he was elected to serve his first term as President of the organization. He is currently the President of the Association of Washington Tribes and has previously served as an Area Vice President on the NCAI Board. Brian Cladoosby has served on the Swinomish Indian Senate, the governing body of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, since 1985.  He has served as the Chairman of the Swinomish Indian Senate since 1997.  

Chairman Cladoosby is one of our most senior tribal political leaders in Washington State and the Pacific Northwest and his experience is reflected in his numerous commitments.  He is the President of the Association of Washington Tribes, Executive Board member of the Washington Gaming Association, past President of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, has retained a seat on the National Congress of American Indians Vice Presidents’ Board, and is continually active in tribal and state politics. On an international basis he is the Co-Speaker of the Coast Salish Gathering, which comprises British Columbia First Nations and Western Washington Tribes.  

In 2011 at the Reservation Economic Summit & American Indian Business Trade Fair, Chairman Cladoosby was awarded the American Indian Tribal Leader Award for his exceptional achievements. Each year this award honors an outstanding leader who supports American Indian business and economic development endeavors in tribal communities. 

Chairman Cladoosby has been instrumental in the domestic and international emergence of the northwest Indian country salmon and seafood industry.  Swinomish Fish Company buys and sells seafood products from tribal, national and international companies, continuing the “buy and sell native” motto of Indian Country. He shares a vision with the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community members to have a strong economic development plan that supports a way of life for today and future generations.

Swinomish is located in the Northwest and has grown our gaming investments from the early days of bingo halls to the full capacity of a gaming enterprise, and expansion into a new resort and golf course.  Like many tribes across the nation, our funds support governmental services and financial support for our community.

Brian and his wife of 35 years, Nina, have two daughters LaVonne and Mary, son-in-law Tylor, granddaughter Isabella and grandson, Nathanael.

Photos from USGS Gallery

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For Immediate Release
Contact: Sandra Kaiser
Media and Community Relations Manager
Phone: 360-867-5213, email: kaisers@evergreen.edu
February 18, 2014

Leader Challenges Higher Ed to Better Serve Native People
(Olympia, Wash.) How to improve educational success for Native Americans will be the theme of a lecture by Brian Cladoosby, current president of the National Congress of American Indians, and chairman of the Swinomish Indian Senate. He will speak on “Tribal Self-Governance and Indian Education” at The Evergreen State College, on Wednesday, February 26, in the Longhouse Education and Cultural Center, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Cladoosby’s lecture marks an enhanced effort by Evergreen to develop curricula and programs that meet the needs of Native students. Some 4.5 percent of current Evergreen students are Native American. The Longhouse Education and Cultural Center is the first Native longhouse built on a public college campus in the U.S. The college also offers a master of public administration degree with a concentration on tribal governance, a program of study on Native American and world indigenous peoples, and sponsors a reservation-based program where classes are offered locally and the study topics are determined in partnership with tribal authorities.
“We’ve come a long way in collaboration with Native communities, and we want to do more,” said Evergreen Provost Michael Zimmerman. Zimmerman cited the recent appointment of former Makah tribal chairman Micah McCarty to the new post of special assistant to the president for tribal government relations as a vital part of the college’s reinvigorated outreach.
Cladoosby’s visit to Evergreen will help faculty, students and the public understand what’s at stake as statistics continue to show Native students falling behind in high school and college graduation rates.
“Chairman Cladoosby’s stature as a national figure and his ideas on how to provide quality education that respects and addresses unique Native cultural and linguistic needs make him an especially important interlocutor on these issues,” said McCarty. “He’s an exemplary leader, and a collaborative partner for Evergreen.”

The National Congress of American Indians, founded in 1944, is the oldest and largest American Indian and Alaska Native organization, serving the broad interests of tribal governments and communities. As one of the most senior tribal political leaders in the Pacific Northwest, Cladoosby has been influential on Indian governance, environmental protection and educational advocacy for decades. He is the president of the Association of Washington Tribes, and co-speaker of the Coast Salish Gathering, which comprises British Columbia First Nations and Western Washington tribes.
The lecture is free and open to the public. Parking is $2.00. The Evergreen State College is located at 2700 Evergreen Parkway NW, in Olympia.

Laura Grabhorn
Assistant Director, Longhouse
The Evergreen State College
(360) 867-6413 phone
(360) 867-6699 fax
GRABHORL@evergreen.edu e-mail

Let’s work together as one unified voice to protect all wolf species on Mother Earth.

“Only the mountain has lived long enough to listen objectively to the howl of a wolf.” -Aldo Leopold

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Every Sunday-4pm-6pm on KAOS 89.3 fm

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Keith and Chenoa Egawa share about their new book “Tani’s Search for the Heart” on Make No Bones About It. 4:30 pm, 2-23-2014

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Keith and Chenoa Egawa are a brother and sister writing and illustrating team of Lummi and S’Klallam Indian ancestry. Keith is a novelist ( Madchild Running) with a background in education reform and social work. Chenoa is a singer, stoyterller and ceremonial leader, who has worked as a professional illustrator, international indigenous human rights advocate and educator.

Book Cover

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Laura Waterman Wittstock shares about her book “We Are Still Here: A Photographic History of the American Indian Movement .” 2-23, 2014 at 4pm

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Laura Waterman Wittstock is the author of several publications, including the forthcoming We Are Still Here co-authored with Dick Bancroft; Diverse Populations/Diverse Needs: Community Foundations and Diversity and Changing Communities,and ININATIG’S Gift of Sugar: Traditional Native Sugar Making. Her journalism background includes: editor of the Legislative Review in Washington, D.C. and reporter and later Executive Director for the American Indian Press Association, also in Washington.

Waterman Wittstock was elected to the Minneapolis Library Board in 2005 and served until the board was dissolved in 2009. She was appointed to the board in 2002 by Mayor R.T. Rybak.

She served as the fourth (2006) Louis W. Hill, Jr. Fellow in Philanthropy under the University of Minnesota’s Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, and serves on a number of nonprofit boards including Bdote Learning Center and the Greater Metropolitan Housing Corporation. She has served on review panels for the National Endowment for the Arts since 1993. She writes opinions in the Indian Country Today Media Network and the Minneapolis Star Tribune’s Your Voices.

E mail: lwmpls@visi.com

Redbone visits with Ras K’dee, on KAOS 89.3 fm 2-16-2014 at 5pm

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Ras K’dee

Ras K’dee (VOCALS & KEYS), from San Francisco, is a Native California (Pomo)/African musician, community educator, and renowned lyricist, producer, & lead vocalist/keyboardist for San Francisco-based live world hip-hop ensemble, Audiopharmacy. For K’dee, his musical inspiration is deeply rooted from his experience as a Pomo/African artist.

Translating artistically through hip-hop rhymes and soulful melodies, K’dee invokes the songs and dances from traditional ceremonies of his native people, and tells stories of resistance, healing, community & empowerment that can be understood and felt universally by all people. He has been compared to the likes of Gil Scott Heron, Marvin Gaye, Michael Franti, Black Star, and Aloe Blacc.  Ras K’dee’s musical repetoire includes “Street Prison” (2005), which was awarded by East Bay Express as Best Local Album of The Year in 2006, co-production on Audiopharmacy album, “U Forgot About Us” (2009), and producing his first solo-project, “Cloudwriter” (2011). K’dee has also had his hand in releasing, producing, and engineering 16 LP albums by local and international artists.

K’dee has toured locally and internationally with Audiopharmacy for 8 consecutive years. In 2002, K’dee co-founded (and is the current director) of a Native youth media organization Seventh Native American Generation (SNAG).  K’dee leads workshops weekly with Youth and co-hosts the radio program “Bay Native Circle” on 94.1 FM in Northern  California.  K’dee has also been featured in Smithsonian Magazine (Summer 2010) and his awards include KQED American Indian Local Heroes Award, and Most Earnest and Up And Coming Band (2005). In 2013 K’dee and band Audiopharmacy were invited as Cultural Music Ambassadors, and toured throughout the South Pacific visiting Indonesia, Fiji, New Zeland, Samoa, and the Solomon Islands, performing and hosting music workshops for Youth. Audiopharmacy’s music was also featured in animation series Injunuity which aired nationally this fall.