Tag Archives: Chief Phil Lane Jr.

Chief Phil Lane Jr. visits with Raven at 5pm on 6/15/2014

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Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First Nations and is an internationally recognized leader in human and community development. He was born at the Haskell Indian School in Lawrence, Kansas in 1944, where his mother and father met and attended school.
During the past 45 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North, Central and South America, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as an Associate Professor at the Faculty of Education at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada (1980-1996). With Elder’s from across North America Phil co-founded the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) in 1982. FWII became an independent Institute in 1995. As well, Phil is a Director of the Four Directions Corporation, an Indigenous owned company, incorporated in 1996’ as Four World’s economic development arm.
With Phil’s guidance and applied experience, FWII has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development. Four Directions’ is the Institute’s economic development arm. It is dedicated to the development of sustainable economic enterprises that support holistic, political, social, cultural, environmental, and educational development.

In 1977, Phil was named a Modern Indian Sports Great by the National Indian Magazine, Wassaja, for his record-breaking accomplishments in Track and Wrestling. He has extensive experience in his own cultural traditions, is an award winning author and film producer and holds Master’s Degrees in Education and Public Administration. His film credits include the National Public Television series “Images of Indians” with the late Will Sampson, “Walking With Grandfather”, “The Honor of All: The Story of Alkali Lake” and “Healing the Hurts” and “Shift of the Ages (SOTA)” released in December, 2012. In January, 2013 SOTA won the Jury Prize for Best Documentary at the World Interfaith Harmony Film Festival, in April, 2013 SOTA won the Audience Choice for Best Documentary at the Riverside International Film Festival and was the Official Selection at the Sedona International Film Festival in February, 2013 and the Black Hills International Film Festival in May, 2013.

In August, 1992, Phil was the first Indigenous person to win the prestigious Windstar Award, presented annually by the late John Denver and the Windstar Foundation to a global citizen whose personal and professional life exemplifies commitment to a global perspective, operates with awareness of the spiritual dimension of human existence and demonstrates concrete actions of the benefit for humans and all living systems of the Earth. At this International event, in recognition of his lineage and long time service to Indigenous peoples and the human family, Indigenous Elders from across North America recognized Phil as a Hereditary Chief through a Traditional Headdress Ceremony.

On November 11, 2000, Phil received the Year 2000 award from the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights in Berne, Switzerland. Phil is the first North or South American person to receive the award. This award was given in recognition of Phil’s “unique contributions to improve the lives and future hopes of Indigenous populations. It is primarily based on his most special merits of promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity rather than opposing oppression directly and, as well, for his international visionary initiatives among Indigenous populations by healing the root causes of hopelessness and despair.”

Other winners of these prestigious awards include, Oceanologist Jacques-Yves Cousteau, David Brower, Yevgeni Velikhov, Vice President of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, Wangari Maathai, Nobel Peace Prize Winner and founder of Kenya’s Greenbelt Movement, Lester Brown, President of the World Watch Institute, the Dalai Lama of Tibet, Dr. Boutros Boutros Ghali, former Secretary General of the United Nations, and British Lord Yehudi Menuhin, musician and philosopher.

On June 21, 2008, Phil was awarded the 14th Annual Ally Award by the Center for Healing Racism in Houston, Texas. The Ally Award is an annual award presented by the Houston-based Center for the Healing of Racism to honor the achievements of those who have worked hard to achieve harmony of all ethnic and cultural groups. Phil received the Ally Award for his national and international work in promoting freedom and justice for Indigenous Peoples by building human and spiritual capacity that focuses on healing the root causes of racism and oppression rather than focusing on conflict. Special emphasis on this award is for Lane’s dedicated work, for more than nineteen years, as one of the primary leaders in the resolution of Canada’s Residential School issue, which involved the sexual, physical, cultural, psychological, and emotional abuse of thousands of Aboriginal Peoples in Canada.

This effort resulted in a $3.5 Billion settlement for Residential School survivors, a full public apology by the Prime Minister of Canada and all Political Party Leaders on the floor of the Canadian Parliament, the establishment of a $500 million Aboriginal Healing Foundation and a formal, five year, Truth and Reconciliation Commission that is currently holding public hearings across Canada on the impact of the Residential Schools on the Aboriginal Peoples of Canada.
In 2008, Phil completed a three-year tenure as CEO of the United Indians of All Tribes Foundation (UIATF) in Seattle, Washington. The Foundation’s achievements include the launching of the first-ever Native American Film Festival, the development of a host of innovative education programs ranging from elementary and high school curriculum design and development, to adult education, early childhood education, and the recent launching of a $3.5 million holistic poverty-alleviation program model for urban Indigenous Peoples in Seattle.

Phil has now stepped into further global leadership as Chairman of the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) and Four Directions International. The Institute’s central initiative since 2009 is the promotion of Deep Social Networks and The Digital Fourth Way. The focus of The Fourth Way is contributing to the unification of the Human Family by co-creating community-based, culturally-respectful, principal-centered strategies and programming that transcends assimilation, resignation, and conflict. This work uses digital communications technologies for local, regional and large scale change by collectively addressing related challenges such as the Alberta Tars Sands and other issues impacting the health and well-being of the Human Family, Mother Earth and the future of our younger generations.

Deep Social Networks (DSN) are principle-centered, collaboratively created and community-based digital networks with purpose for uplifting education, harmonious development, child protection, social and environmental justice, such as the Alberta Tar Sands and unifying Indigenous Peoples and marginalized, underserved communities in the Americas in harmony with the Reunion of the Condor and Eagle.

On June 9, 2013 the Four Worlds Foundation has been officially opened at the City of Knowledge located at the former Clayton Military Base in the Panama Canal Zone, Panama. The Four Worlds Foundation in Panama will be the International Training Center and Digital DSN Hub for actualizing the Reunion of the Condor and Eagle via the Fourth Way across the Americas and beyond!

Bio of Phil Lnae Jr

Chief Phil Lane Jr and Faith Spotted Eagle -Message to Obama – Reject and Protect. April 20th, 2014 at 5pm

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Chief Phil Lane Jr and Faith Spotted Eagle in Ottawa on March 20. Photo courtesy of Rueben George

Pipeline Fighters Unite to Protect Future Generation’s Water and Land
Message to Obama – Reject and Protect.

Oceti Sakowin Territory – Just three days before the U.S. Department of State’s public comment period ended on the TransCanada’s Keystone XL Pipeline Project (KXL), Pipeline Fighters and Water Protectors from across South Dakota and Nebraska gathered for a meeting in Winner, SD, hosted by the Ihanktonwan Treaty Council and the Brave Heart Society to discuss direct-action campaign strategies that will include grassroots spiritual camps along the Keystone XL corridor, as well as a National event to be held the third week of April, 2014, with the message to President Obama – “Reject and Protect”.

Tribal members of the Oceti Sakowin, along with allies discussed how to heighten awareness of the catastrophic danger that the monstrous KXL Pipeline will not only have on the water, which will be non-reversible damage, but to the entire Midwest, known to most Americans as the Bread Basket of America.

The proposed 1,700 mile TransCanada’s Keystone XL will pump the dirtiest, highly toxic oil from the tar sands in Canada, going directly over the north-east portion of the Ogallala Aquifer, which is the largest fresh water aquifer in the United States and provides water to ranches, farms, towns and cities from South Dakota all the way to Texas. This pipeline will stretch from the Canadian border, through the Dakotas and the Sand Hills of Nebraska and all the way to the oil refineries in Texas, owned by the Koch Brothers, who also have shares in TransCanada.

Chief Arvol Looking Horse, 19th Keeper of the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe, offered the opening prayers at the meeting and provided encouragement to continue the unification of all people to stop the desecration of Mother Earth. “My heart is heavy, the Water of life – Mini Wiconi is speaking to us through our ceremonies and many people are having dreams. As I hear the Voices standing up against the destruction of Grandmother Earth, I realize we need to stand in Unity to protect the Water of Life,” Looking Horse said.

It is the position of the Pipeline Fighters and Water Protectors that the KXL poses a direct threat of major water contamination along this route. There are also twenty-two rivers that are in the direct path of the KXL. “They will go approximately twenty-five feet below the bedrock of these rivers,” said John Harter, one of the local ranchers. In addition, numerous other water sources, such as wells and tributaries will also be affected when the KXL leaks or breaks.

The impact to Native species along the route were also discussed and how the building of the KXL will affect the precious ecosystem, already stressed from past years droughts, such as migratory birds like the Sand Crane in Nebraska. “We witnessed the Sand Cranes coming to greet us when we had our first spiritual camp in Ponca, Neb.” Said Aldo Seoane, Oyate Wahacanka Woecun.

Jane Kleeb of Bold Nebraska spoke about the Washington DC action that took place in front of the White House on Sunday March 2nd, where 300 individuals were arrested opposing the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline. Kleeb stressed the need to have focused, unified, direct action campaigns opposing the pipeline, showing unity between the landowners and local tribes.

“Our ranching and farming families have a tradition of protecting their neighbors. If a fence is down, your neighbors are right there helping you. That is why the Cowboy and Indian Alliance is strong. We are neighbors with shared values of protecting our land and water for future generations. We are proud people and we will stop this pipeline.” Kleeb said.

Meeting organizer, Faith Spotted Eagle, Protect the Sacred and the Brave Heart Society, focused discussion on upcoming spiritual camps that each of the tribes agreed to hold on their respective reservations and close as possible to the KXL corridor. “We need to pursue a unified message and approach for all allies, including media strategies, and Indigenized Consultations Standards as an act of sovereignty,” she said.

Another major concern is TransCanada’s plans to set up several “man camps” along the KXL route. One of the camps is sited to be built in Opal, SD, where it was reported that there may be up to 1,500 men in one camp. “This is a form of militarism, bringing in these man camps,” said Spotted Eagle. “For those of us who have the history, it smacks of repetitive economics, when they put us in forts and they wanted our land. All we’re willing to do here is sell our soul, just for the economy. That’s the dark side.”

The group discussed dates and locations for where some of the encampments may be held and will coordinate media updates to notify the public when the spiritual camps will be occupied. Treaty elder advisors explained protocol to be in place for organizing the upcoming actions. Protect the Sacred will be offering some resources for spiritual camp organizing for those grassroots communities in the direct path of the KXL.

Gary Dorr of Oyate Wahacanka Woecun (Shielding the People) spoke about camp specifics and strategies to ensure that the overall message of solidarity against the pipeline was heard. Oglala Sioux tribal representatives also pledged support for the camps, along with Rosebud Sioux Tribe. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal officials were not in attendance; however their official Tribal resolution opposing the Keystone XL Pipeline was presented to organizers.

Rebecca Tobias, Director of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Ethics, cited a need to involve the international communities. Tobias arranged for a question and answer session with an international law firm. One of the key topics of the session was the need for the national and international communities to acknowledge the validity of the treaties between the United States and tribes. Tobias challenged the public to become aware of how, “the government can acknowledge the NAFTA (The North American Free Trade Agreement) and follow it to a ‘T’ but fail to acknowledge the treaties signed between the US government and federally recognized tribes?”

The majority of the Oceti Sakowin stands strong with a message of No KXL in Treaty Territory and will continue to protect their historical treaty lands, sacred sites and sacred species. The 1980 United States Supreme Court ruled that the Treaty is the “Supreme Law of the Land” and the Tribes have been steadfast for the United States to honor the treaties, which can help protect all those living within the treaty boundaries their inherent right to clean drinking water, now and for future generations.

Carla Rae Marshall, a member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe and Protect the Sacred media coordinator said, “I believe this (KXL) is not just an environmental issue, it is also a human rights issue, and it doesn’t seem that TransCanada, or the U.S. politicians that are for the building of this pipeline care about our water being contaminated. Water is life, and without water there is no life. Why don’t they understand that?”

The Brave Heart Society and Ihanktonwan Treaty Committee would like to thank the following organizations for attending: Wolakota-World Peace and Prayer Day, Oyate Wahacanka Woecun, Oglala Sioux Tribe, Bold Nebraska, 350.org, Dakota Rural Action-Nebraska Chapter, Cowboy Indian Alliance, White Buffalo Calf Woman Society, Domestic Violence Prevention Initiative of RST, Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Ethics, members of the Oceti Sakowin, concerned land owners, ranchers and citizens. They also would like to thank all those who are committed to standing up for our future generations and look forward to more organizations, tribes and citizens joining in these unified efforts to stop TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline and the Tar Sands.

Please watch for further updates via social media and/or at the following websites: http://www.boldnebraska.org, http://www.protectthesacred.org or http://www.shieldthepeople.org .

Contact:

Jane Kleeb, Bold Nebraska – jane.kleeb@gmail.com

Gary Dorr, Oyate Wahacanka Woecun – Shielding the People – gfdorr@gmail.com

Carla Rae Marshall, Protect the Sacred – tipistola@gmail.com

Raven visits with Chief Phil Lane Jr., 3-16-2014 at 5:00pm

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Chief Phil Lane Jr. is a traditionally recognized Hereditary Chief and Elder. He is an enrolled member of the Ihanktonwan Dakota and Chickasaw Nations, and is a citizen of both Canada and the United States

“Global Changes, Indigenous Peoples and Prophecies !” with Phil Lane Jr. – on KAOS radio , 1-19-2014 at 5pm

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Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First Nations and is an internationally recognized leader inhuman and community development. During the past 44 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North, Central and SouthAmerica, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as Associate Professor and Founder and Chairman of the Four Worlds International Institute at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. …With Phil’s guidance and applie…d experience, Four Worlds has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development.Phil has extensive experience in his own cultural traditions, is an award winning author and film producer, and holds Master’s Degrees in Education and Public Administration. He received numerous international awards for his work, among which the Year 2000 award from the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights in Berne, Switzerland. Phil is the first North or South American person to receive the award, and he joins a select international group: the Dalai Lama of Tibet, Dr. Boutro Boutros Ghali, former Secretary General of the United Nations, and British Lord Yehudi Menuhin, musician and philosopher, have, also, received the award. The foundation says the award is in recognition of Phil’s “most special merits of promoting freedom and justice for indigenous people by building human and spiritual capacity rather than opposing oppression directly and also on his international visionary initiatives among Native populations by healing the root causes of hopelessness and despair.”

http://inclaritas.com/community/chief-phil-lane-jr/

Indigenous Elder and Leader Chief Phil Lane Jr on Make No Bones About It. July 28th, 2013 at 5pm

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Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First. National Indian Magazine named Phil named a Modern Indian Sports Great for his record-breaking accomplishments in track and wrestling in 1977. For 44 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North, Central and South America, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii, and Africa. For 16 years he taught at the University of Lethbridge, in Alberta, Canada. With elders from across North America, Phil co-founded the Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) in 1982.

Today he chairs the Four Directions International, an indigenous-owned economic development company incorporated in 1996, focusing on the importance of culture and spirituality in development. Phil is an award-winning author and film producer, whose credits include “Images of Indians, “Walking With Grandfather,” and “Healing the Hurts.” He has been honored by Indigenous elders as Hereditary Chief through a traditional headdress ceremony. He was the first indigenous person to receive the Windstar Award, and has been honored by the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights, in Switzerland, and the Center for Healing Racism in Houston.

more info : www.fwii.net

Chief Phil Lane Jr- On Protecting the Sacred. 4-21-2013 5pm

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Hereditary chief of the Ihanktonwan First Nation Phil Lane Jr. said the treaty reinforces First Nations obligations to defend the environment based on ancient laws, now and into the future.

“This is part of a much larger global campaign called Protect the Sacred. The sacred is not limited to stopping tar sands projects. It’s a global Indigenous movement with allies around the world that are going to focus very specifically on issues that are negatively impacting Mother Earth and Indigenous peoples and humanity, all members of the human family.”

http://www.vancouverobserver.com/sustainability/international-treaty-protect-sacred-tar-sands-project-signed-first-nations-s-dakota

photo from:
http://thechronicleherald.ca/canada/1076707-first-nations-target-pipelines

Raven visits with Chief Phil Lane Jr. 12-23-2012 at 4pm

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Although an accomplished athlete and an acclaimed film producer, Phil Lane Jr.’s life has, first and foremost, been an exercise in fostering human relations and community development. Native American and a hereditary Chief – of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw tribes – Lane has dedicated himself for over four decades to the pursuit of equality for the indigenous peoples of four different continents, including Africa. Born at the Haskell Indian Residential School, Lane grew up understanding, firsthand, the economic, spiritual, and political struggles of native groups. With that understanding, Lane chose, as an adult, to begin his career as an educator, speaking to students of all levels and ages about the culture and history of Native American peoples. In 1982, he was a founding member of the organization for which he still works as International Coordinator: Four Worlds International, a non-profit that brings unites the peoples of multiple tribes in development efforts. Ten years after the founding of Four Worlds, Lane was named the recipient of the prestigious Windstar Award for his tireless dedication toward a sustainable future for indigenous people on a global level. Lane was the first and, to date, only Native American to have ever been distinguished with the elite honor. Several years of guiding native communities toward a more prosperous and holistic life experience inspired Lane to write a novel as well as produce multiple television programs and films, including the award-winning series “Walking with Grandfather.” With a keen sense of responsibility and an undying respect towards the tribes into which he was born, Lane is tirelessly focused on the well-being and sustainability of native peoples in North America and around the world.
Quotations

“In all of our actions, we must seek to be living examples of the changes we wish to see in the world. By walking the path, we make the path visible”

“The greater the difficulty in our path, the greater the opportunity for our growth and ultimate victory; we can always become more than we have ever been.”
References
http://www.architectsofpeace.org/architects-of-peace/phil-lane-jr-

Resume of Phil Lane, Jr.: http://www.4worlds.org/4w/resume/philresume.htm

Phil Lane Jr. Reflects on Working Toward Peace: http://www.scu.edu/ethics/architects-of-peace/Lane/essay.html
Swiss Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights: http://www.4worlds.org/4w/SWISS%20AWARD/laudatory.html

Join us as we visit with Barney Bush and Kris Barney this July 22, 2012, at 4pm.

Join us as we visit with Barney Bush and Kris Barney this July 22, 2012, at 4pm.

Before returning full time to his Ohio River homelands, poet/education- activist/patriot Barney Bush wrote about his homelands and the destruction of water, sky, land, forests , animals, people and became published and translated internationally. He has taught in numerous colleges and universities in the U.S. and has a B.A. in Humanities from Ft. Lewis College, Durango Colorado, a Masters of Arts in English and Fine Arts from the University of Idaho in Moscow, Idaho, and sixty five hours beyond the masters. He has also taught writing and English logic classes in Native American schools all over North America including Alaska and Hawaii. He has been a guest speaker in universities of western Europe as well as North and Central America.

Bush has also served as a writer-in- residence for numerous arts councils including those in New York, North Carolina, Illinois, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Vermont and more. From 1989 through 2005 he was on contract with nato Records in Paris, France, where he recorded numerous musical and spoken poetry albums. All lyrics were written by Bush, and music was composed by Tony Hymas, English composer and recording artist, who employed the use of Native American music and performers throughout the albums. One of their early albums, (Left for Dead), was admitted to the list of the “Greatest Experimental Hits in the History of Music.”

Bush is also the first indigenous poet admitted to the Society of Artists, Composers and Editors of Music (SACEM), Paris, France.Shawnee poet, Barney Bush, was inspired to react to the losing of his homelands. During the sixties he became involved with the American Indian Movement which was just forming in Minneapolis, Minnesota. During this time, he became involved in protests over the lack of understanding about Native people in their own homelands. He was an organizer, among many, of several schools throughout Indian country and helped, in 1970, create the first Native American Studies programs for colleges, high schools and grade schools in the United States. Bush came to see that the only way to save and promote the growth of homelands and culture was through organizing and truly learning the culture of colonial America. He believes that Native peoples’ owning and sharing their own businesses and schools is a primary factor in purchasing back our homelands for future generations.

http://www.vinyardindiansettlement.org/sample-page/

about Kris:
Kris Barney ” Dine’ Poet & traditional farmer from Tse’ Chi’zhi'”

Ya’a’teeh. Shi ei Kristopher Barney yinishye’. Honaghaanii Nishli’, Tlashchi’i’ Bashishchiin, Tachiinii Da Shi Che’, Todiko’zhi doo Kiisani Dine’e’ Da Shi Nali’. Tse’ Chi’zhi’ dęę

There is no compromise. I’ve lived all my life with one of the worlds biggest and ugliest coal stripmines in my back yard, i am the descendant of medicine people and warriors. My ancestors never went on the Long Walk to Hweeldi’, I am a survivor and hold the medicine of freedom, words, emotions that draw their power, strength, beauty and purpose from the first wind, breath of creation.

I am a Honaghaanii man and Nashdoistoh is my protector

Global Economic Challenges and Indigenous Prophecies with Chief Phil Lane Jr.

Raven visits with Chief Phil Lane this Sunday, June 17th, 2012 at 4pm.

Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Sioux and Chickasaw Nations and is an internationally recognized leader in human and community development. He was born at the Haskell Indian Residential School in Lawrence, Kansas in 1944, where his mother and father met and attended school. He is a citizen of both Canada and the USA.

During the past 44 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North, Central and South America, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as Associate Professor and Founder and Coordinator of the Four Worlds International Institute at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. Four Worlds became an independent Institute in 1995. As well, Phil is Chairman of Four Directions International, an Aboriginal company, which was incorporated in 1996 as Four Worlds’ Economic Development Arm.

With Phil’s guidance and applied experience, Four Worlds has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development. Four Directions International, the Institute’s economic development arm, is lead by its President Deloria Many Grey Horses, and is dedicated to the development of sustainable economic enterprises that support wholistic, political, social, cultural, environmental, spiritual and educational development.

read more about Chief Phil Lane Jr.

Indigenous People Light Sacred Fire Ahead of Rio+20

INVITATION FROM DAVE COURCHENE (NII GAANI AKI ININI – LEADING EARTH MAN), ANISHNABE NATION

INVITATION FROM DAVE COURCHENE (NII GAANI AKI ININI – LEADING EARTH MAN), ANISHNABE NATION
• To the Elders, Bundle carriers, Oral historians and Traditional knowledge keepers to gather at the Turtle Lodge in the Sagkeeng First Nation in southeastern Manitoba. Open to All!
• **THIS IS A DRUG/ALCOHOL-FREE EVENT**
LOCATION
• At the Turtle Lodge: a place built from a vision, with volunteer assistance and which is completely independent from outside organizations, associations and funding
• Camping is available on site and at the Sagkeeng Pow Wow grounds. Showers available at Sagkeeng arena. Hotels are available nearby. Location & directions at http://theturtlelodge.org/visit.html
COST
• Individuals will be responsible for their own travel and accommodation expenses
• Visitors are welcome to camp on site
• Communities & organizations are invited to sponsor an Elder’s expenses
• Bring food, chairs, tobacco and a donation of your choice to contribute to the gathering!
• We’re asking All those Attending the GATHERING OF THE WISDOM KEEPERS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF THE AMERICAS May 24-27 to support the Gathering by bringing food to share for each meal. This will be a Traditional gathering, following the Spirit of our Indigenous Ancestors. The Strength of the Gathering will be determined by the Giving and Sharing that takes place 🙂
CELEBRATION ROUND DANCE AT POW WOW GROUNDS FRIDAY MAY 25
• We are making a Call for Traditional Dancers and Drums for the CELEBRATION *ROUND DANCE* at the Sagkeeng Pow Wow Grounds Friday May 25. You don’t have to be a Traditional Dancer to participate… the Round Dance will be open to all People! If enough people come out the first day, the Round Dance will continue Saturday May 26! Contact turtlelodge@mts.net for more information!
HEALING CEREMONIES
• There will be Healing Ceremonies at Turtle Lodge – Thursday Evening May 24, 2012, starting at 7 pm.
AGENDA
• Daily Sunrise Ceremonies
• Original Instructions on How to Live a Good Life
• Creation Stories
• Sacredness of Life Teachings from the Grandmothers
• Vision Quest Teachings from Grandfathers
• The Great Binding Law of the Creator (Ogitchi Tibakonegaywin)
• Original Understanding of the Treaties
• Traditional Approaches to Health
• Prophecies
• The Seven Teachings
• Youth Presentations
• Taking Care of Mother Earth
• Restoring Family Values
SPEAKERS INCLUDING
• Elder Betty Ann Little Wolf
• Elder Katherine Whitecloud
• Elder Eleanor Skeade
• Elder Laura Horton
• Elder Mary Lorraine Mandamin
• Janet Fox
• Rainey Gaywish
• Elder Dave Courchene
• Elder Robert Greene
• Elder Arvol Looking Horse
• Elder Morris Little Wolf
• Elder Adolphus Cameron
• Elder Harry Bone
• Elder Peter Atkinson
• Elder Tommy White
• First Nations Leader Ovide Mercredi
• Youth Leader Erica Daniels
• Youth Leader Jerry Daniels
• Comedian Moccasin Joe
• Local Talent from Sagkeeng First Nation
JOIN THE EVENT ON FACEBOOK!
https://www.facebook.com/events/256833127688864/
CONTACT turtlelodge@mts.net