Tag Archives: First Peoples

Chief Beau Dick visits with Raven Redbone, 3-9-2014 at 4:30 pm

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Beau Dick

Kwakwaka’wakw

(1955- )

Beau Dick was born in Alert Bay on the Northern tip of Vancouver Island and was raised in the neighbouring Kwakwaka’wakw village of Kingcome Inlet. The isolation of the remote villages slowed down the processes of cultural destruction, which had devastated many other villages on the coast. Many of the Kwakwaka’wakw master artists, including Willie Seaweed, Charlie James, and Mungo Martin as well as Beau’s father Ben Dick and grandfather James Dick carried the art and culture through the period of cultural assimilation and transition to become among the first carvers to receive recognition as “name” artists beyond the cultural definition. They also carried the wealth of songs, dances, and ceremonial rites, which were passed on to the dedicated young artists such as Beau who was among the first artists of the modern era. Alert Bay remains a cultural centre as well as producing such noted artists as Wayne Alfred, Russell Smith, Bruce Alfred and Doug Cramner.

Beau’s first carving was a miniature totem pole based on the pole his father carved to commemorate the visit of King George XI. His father also carved the largest freestanding totem pole (173-feet) to commemorate Canada’s centennial in 1967.

Beau moved to Vancouver to complete high school. He became interested in painting and produced several large canvases in a naturalistic style representing Kwakwaka’wakw mythological figures and ceremonial dancers. He continued to carve and received several important commissions while still a young artist; he painted the dance screen for the Cape Mudge museum and was among the youngest artists chosen for the Legacy Exhibition.

The Legacy Exhibition (documented in the book The Legacy—Traditions and Innovation in Northwest Coast Indian Art by Peter Macnair) hosted by the Royal British Columbia Museum in Victoria (1972) was one of the first major exhibitions to focus on contemporary artists. The exhibition traveled until 1982. The exhibition and catalogue became a major resource for the growing collector base interested in contemporary Northwest Coast art. Beau exhibited two works, a Noohmahl (fool dancer) and a Tuxw’id or Kominicka mask both carved in the powerful tradition of the War Spirit Ceremony. These masks were instrumental in building the market for the more powerful and darker subjects of the Kwakwaka’wakw traditional ceremonies.

Beau is a prolific and respected artist. He was chosen to carve the large four way split transformation mask for the Canadian Pavilion at Expo ‘86 in Vancouver, British Columbia, now in the collection of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Hull, Quebec. He was also commissioned to carve a major eleven-figure pole by the City of Vancouver for Stanley Park.

©2001 Spirit Wrestler Gallery

Please join us in welcoming Brian Cladoosby on Wednesday February 26, 2014 at the Longhouse 3:30 PM to 5:30 PM

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Brian Cladoosby, NCAI President

Brian Cladoosby serves as the 21st President of NCAI.  In October 2013 at NCAI’s 71st Annual Convention he was elected to serve his first term as President of the organization. He is currently the President of the Association of Washington Tribes and has previously served as an Area Vice President on the NCAI Board. Brian Cladoosby has served on the Swinomish Indian Senate, the governing body of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, since 1985.  He has served as the Chairman of the Swinomish Indian Senate since 1997.  

Chairman Cladoosby is one of our most senior tribal political leaders in Washington State and the Pacific Northwest and his experience is reflected in his numerous commitments.  He is the President of the Association of Washington Tribes, Executive Board member of the Washington Gaming Association, past President of the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, has retained a seat on the National Congress of American Indians Vice Presidents’ Board, and is continually active in tribal and state politics. On an international basis he is the Co-Speaker of the Coast Salish Gathering, which comprises British Columbia First Nations and Western Washington Tribes.  

In 2011 at the Reservation Economic Summit & American Indian Business Trade Fair, Chairman Cladoosby was awarded the American Indian Tribal Leader Award for his exceptional achievements. Each year this award honors an outstanding leader who supports American Indian business and economic development endeavors in tribal communities. 

Chairman Cladoosby has been instrumental in the domestic and international emergence of the northwest Indian country salmon and seafood industry.  Swinomish Fish Company buys and sells seafood products from tribal, national and international companies, continuing the “buy and sell native” motto of Indian Country. He shares a vision with the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community members to have a strong economic development plan that supports a way of life for today and future generations.

Swinomish is located in the Northwest and has grown our gaming investments from the early days of bingo halls to the full capacity of a gaming enterprise, and expansion into a new resort and golf course.  Like many tribes across the nation, our funds support governmental services and financial support for our community.

Brian and his wife of 35 years, Nina, have two daughters LaVonne and Mary, son-in-law Tylor, granddaughter Isabella and grandson, Nathanael.

Photos from USGS Gallery

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For Immediate Release
Contact: Sandra Kaiser
Media and Community Relations Manager
Phone: 360-867-5213, email: kaisers@evergreen.edu
February 18, 2014

Leader Challenges Higher Ed to Better Serve Native People
(Olympia, Wash.) How to improve educational success for Native Americans will be the theme of a lecture by Brian Cladoosby, current president of the National Congress of American Indians, and chairman of the Swinomish Indian Senate. He will speak on “Tribal Self-Governance and Indian Education” at The Evergreen State College, on Wednesday, February 26, in the Longhouse Education and Cultural Center, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Cladoosby’s lecture marks an enhanced effort by Evergreen to develop curricula and programs that meet the needs of Native students. Some 4.5 percent of current Evergreen students are Native American. The Longhouse Education and Cultural Center is the first Native longhouse built on a public college campus in the U.S. The college also offers a master of public administration degree with a concentration on tribal governance, a program of study on Native American and world indigenous peoples, and sponsors a reservation-based program where classes are offered locally and the study topics are determined in partnership with tribal authorities.
“We’ve come a long way in collaboration with Native communities, and we want to do more,” said Evergreen Provost Michael Zimmerman. Zimmerman cited the recent appointment of former Makah tribal chairman Micah McCarty to the new post of special assistant to the president for tribal government relations as a vital part of the college’s reinvigorated outreach.
Cladoosby’s visit to Evergreen will help faculty, students and the public understand what’s at stake as statistics continue to show Native students falling behind in high school and college graduation rates.
“Chairman Cladoosby’s stature as a national figure and his ideas on how to provide quality education that respects and addresses unique Native cultural and linguistic needs make him an especially important interlocutor on these issues,” said McCarty. “He’s an exemplary leader, and a collaborative partner for Evergreen.”

The National Congress of American Indians, founded in 1944, is the oldest and largest American Indian and Alaska Native organization, serving the broad interests of tribal governments and communities. As one of the most senior tribal political leaders in the Pacific Northwest, Cladoosby has been influential on Indian governance, environmental protection and educational advocacy for decades. He is the president of the Association of Washington Tribes, and co-speaker of the Coast Salish Gathering, which comprises British Columbia First Nations and Western Washington tribes.
The lecture is free and open to the public. Parking is $2.00. The Evergreen State College is located at 2700 Evergreen Parkway NW, in Olympia.

Laura Grabhorn
Assistant Director, Longhouse
The Evergreen State College
(360) 867-6413 phone
(360) 867-6699 fax
GRABHORL@evergreen.edu e-mail

Keith and Chenoa Egawa share about their new book “Tani’s Search for the Heart” on Make No Bones About It. 4:30 pm, 2-23-2014

Tani's Search

Keith and Chenoa Egawa are a brother and sister writing and illustrating team of Lummi and S’Klallam Indian ancestry. Keith is a novelist ( Madchild Running) with a background in education reform and social work. Chenoa is a singer, stoyterller and ceremonial leader, who has worked as a professional illustrator, international indigenous human rights advocate and educator.

Book Cover

Tani's Search_Page_1

Native Storytellers connect us to the past and future. Healing History: Let’s make it right: Time for us all to heal. -on KAOS 89.3fm 4-8pm 1-26-2014

Native Storytellers Connect us to the past and the future. Healing History: Let’s make it right. Time to heal.

Make No Bones About It and View from the Shore.

Sunday, January 26th, 2014, from 4-8 pm, tune into KAOS radio 89.3 fm

www.kaosradio.org— with Robert G BlackfootRaven, Harvest Moon, Paul Cheoketen Wagner, Roderick Harris, Robert TheRise Frederiksen, Gary Wessels-Galbreath and Olivia Hart  at KAOS Community Radio.

NATIVE STORYTELLING EVENT

“Global Changes, Indigenous Peoples and Prophecies !” with Phil Lane Jr. – on KAOS radio , 1-19-2014 at 5pm

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Phil Lane Jr. is an enrolled member of the Yankton Dakota and Chickasaw First Nations and is an internationally recognized leader inhuman and community development. During the past 44 years, he has worked with Indigenous peoples in North, Central and SouthAmerica, Micronesia, South East Asia, India, Hawaii and Africa. He served 16 years as Associate Professor and Founder and Chairman of the Four Worlds International Institute at the University of Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada. …With Phil’s guidance and applie…d experience, Four Worlds has become an internationally recognized leader in human, community and organizational development because of the Institute’s unique focus on the importance of culture and spirituality in all elements of development.Phil has extensive experience in his own cultural traditions, is an award winning author and film producer, and holds Master’s Degrees in Education and Public Administration. He received numerous international awards for his work, among which the Year 2000 award from the Foundation for Freedom and Human Rights in Berne, Switzerland. Phil is the first North or South American person to receive the award, and he joins a select international group: the Dalai Lama of Tibet, Dr. Boutro Boutros Ghali, former Secretary General of the United Nations, and British Lord Yehudi Menuhin, musician and philosopher, have, also, received the award. The foundation says the award is in recognition of Phil’s “most special merits of promoting freedom and justice for indigenous people by building human and spiritual capacity rather than opposing oppression directly and also on his international visionary initiatives among Native populations by healing the root causes of hopelessness and despair.”

http://inclaritas.com/community/chief-phil-lane-jr/

We are now at the Crossroads​, please share Urgent

Listen we are all needed. from Paula Horne:

The Kogi from Columbia traveled and brought a message: The temple of life is now broken, we must awaken and stand for life, because the Chief of Chaos is now reigning. No longer is it just in our communities, it has spread in our water of l…ife, in our sacred air and broken our Mother Earth. People have come to a place of not caring and wanting to go out…

I think all people better pay attention, because no one is exempt, I still believe we as humans can make a change “All Nations, All Faiths, One Prayer”.

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Nov. 8th Tepco will begin moving over 1000 dangerous fuel rods, many giving their lives to do it. 2001 WPPD statement ending from Chief Arvol Looking Horse, I think it fits this terrible scenario we are ALL facing about Fukashima: “You must decide. You can’t avoid it. Each of us is put here in this time and this place to personally decide the future of humankind. Did you think the Creator would create unnecessary people in a time of such terrible danger? Know that you yourself are essential to this World. Believe that! Understand both the blessing and the burden of that. You yourself are desperately needed to save the soul of this World. Did you think you were put here for something less?” Below informational utube of what we are facing and the Elders statement.
COUNCIL FUKUSHIMA STATEMENT OCT 2013

The link below goes to the our visit.

We are now at the Crossroads​, please share Urgent.

Peter Boome on the next Make No Bones About It. 8-25-2013, 5pm

peter-broome-005-sfwAward Award winning Coast Salish artist Peter Boome is a member of the Upper Skagit Tribe of Washington State. He works in a variety of mediums with a primary focus on printmaking and graphic work. Peter earned his AA from Northwest Indian College, his BA from the Evergreen State College and his JD from the University of Washington School Of Law. He is currently finishing his Master’s of Environmental Studies at Evergreen State College, as well as pursuing a PhD through the School of Indigenous Graduate Studies Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi in New Zealand.

Peter’s work has been aggressively sought after by collectors throughout the world. His art pieces span the continents in various European countries as well as New Zealand, Australia, Asia and Africa. Peter is a regular attendee of many prestigious juried art markets and events throughout the country, such as the Santa Fe Indian Market. His work has shown at institutions such as the National Museum of the American Indian both in New York and Washington DC. Some other places Peter has also shown include the Heard Museum in Phoenix, the Eiteljorg Museum in Indianapolis, the Autry Museum in Los Angeles, Indian Art Market in Santa Fe, and the Washington State History Museum where his work is part of the permanent collection. Peter’s work is carried by many galleries and art distributors throughout the world.

Peter works in a variety of mediums such as painting, carving, inlay, and glass work, but he is best known for his Hand-pulled serigraphs. He prints his own original work as well as the work of other artists. As a printer, Peter has worked with both new and established artists. He has worked with indigenous artists from New Zealand and Canada and has been active in printing indigenous work and giving back to his community. Through this commitment to his community Peter has introduced the work of many artists who would not have been otherwise able to have their work printed.

For more information about Peter and his art visit his website and blog at: araquin.com   For questions about individual work such as pricing and availability or to contact Peter email him at:   pete@araquin.com

Artist Statement

Peter’s artist statement says, “Art is all around us. Art is everywhere in life, there are lines, curves, shapes, colors, and shades all around us. Each culture has its own way of expressing the art of our world, a window through which we view the world. I am a Coast Salish Artist. My art is rooted in a historical design tradition. My art is a direct reflection of my culture; it is also a reflection of my personal, cultural, and world view.

I believe art is more than a simple reflection of culture. I feel art influences and guides cultures in many directions and ways. If you accept that art and culture are intrinsically connected you realize that art like culture is malleable, while based on a historic foundation both continue to evolve and expand. Our use and need of art is as strong as our use and need of culture. It is intrinsically connected; it surrounds us and often guides us. As an artist representing a distinct culture there is a moral obligation to carry on the artistic tradition with the upmost care and respect. We must carry on this tradition by honoring the past, representing the present, and laying the foundations for the future.”

For questions about pricing and availability and for more information about Peter or to view his work, check out his website and blog:

http://www.araquin.com

Josephine Mandamin — We Are Water People

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Mother Earth Water Walk

Sla Hal gathering& history with Marvin Kempf and Mark Johns-Colson. March 10th, 2013 at 4pm

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Sla-hal is tied to the people of this area, pre-Clovis, since time immemorial. The finding of the sla-hal bones with the mastodon bring the past to the present, justifying the oral tradition of the people of the Pacific Northwest. Sla-hal began as a game between the animals and the humans.

Learn more by tuning in to Make No Bones About It.

Kate Elliott on KAOS this coming Sunday at 5pm, Jan.27th


Kate Elliott Bio