Tag Archives: Human Rights

Good Shield Aguilar / 7th Generation Rise, on KAOS 89.3 fm, April 12, 2015 at 4pm

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GoodShield Aguilar is of Oglala lakota and Pasqua Yaqui origin. he has been a visual artist as long as he can remember, but discovered music as a teenager and he has made music and art a grounding point from which cultural identity could be expressed and environmental causes could be addressed, particularly with the yellowstone Buffalo (www.buffalofieldcampaign.org). Aside from playing as a solo acoustic artist, beating a driving bass drum while strumming a guitar and singing original song with native “chants” and spoken word, he can also be seen around the country (and recently, across the great pond) with drummer, Johnnie Martinez and flautist, Mignon Geli. In this instrumental arrangement, they can range from Funk, Rock, Reggae, Latin Soul and anywhere in between the 7 generations….

 

 

Charles Upham and Joanelle Romero, share on “Make No Bones About It.” April 12th, 2015 at 5pm

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Raven will visit with Charles Upham and Joanelle Romero, April 12th, 2015 at 5pm only on KAOS 89.3 fm.

Charles Upham a member of the Blackfeet Nation,  father of award-winning actress Misty Upham, and of owner of Reelworks Entertainment Group will be joined with Joanelle Romero of Apache, Cheyenne, Spanish and Jewish heritage is the founder of Red Nation Celebration .

We will be learning more about  Native Women in Film & Television Film Festival that happen recently(2015)  honoring his late daughter award-winning actress Misty Upham .

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Alan Parker, a Citizen of the Chippewa Cree Tribal Nation, on “Make No Bones About It.” 3-15-2015, 5pm

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Alan Parker, a Citizen of the Chippewa Cree Tribal Nation, serves as Adjunct Faculty for Tribal Students enrolled in the Indigenous Development and Advancement PhD program at Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi.

Alan Parker served as Staff Director, Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Washington, DC, where was appointed by Senator Daniel K Inouye, Chairman of the Committee. His responsibilities as Staff Director included the development of a comprehensive legislative program for the Committee. Major legislative initiatives of the Committee during this time included the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, the National Museum of American Indian Act, the Indian Self-Governance Act, the Native American Graves and Repatriation Act and the Indian Housing Act. In the 1980’s, Alan served as President, The American Indian National Bank, Washington, DC. The AINB was the only National Bank in the US owned and operated by Indian Tribes. Established in 1974, the Tribal Shareholders engaged in commercial banking serving a market of Tribal Business enterprises. Prior to this, he was appointed by Sen. James Abourezk and served as Chief Counsel, Select Committee on Indian Affairs, United States Senate, Washington, DC, from April 1977 until July 1980. The Select Committee was created to serve as the first independent legislative Committee within the US Congress with responsibility for all legislative proposals dealing with Native American issues and concerns. They also exercised congressional oversight authority over federal agencies and offices charged with US Trust Responsibilities and public services for the 350 Indian Tribal and Alaska Native communities located in the US. Major legislative activities conducted under Parker’s term in this office included The Indian Child Welfare Act, The American Indian Religious Freedom Act, and Tribal Colleges authorizing Authority as well as historical Indian Land and Water Rights Legislative Settlements.

Education Achievements: Parker attended UCLA School of Law, Los Angeles, California, where he received a Juris Doctor degree in June 1972. Parker’s work researching Tribal and State Court Relationships led to publication of his work in the University of Montana Law Review

Military Service: In June 1965 Parker was drafted into the US Army and was sent to Officer Candidate School where he received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Signal Corps and served until August 1968 when he was honorably discharged. Prior to being discharged he was awarded a Bronze Star medal for meritorious service under combat conditions in the Republic of South Vietnam.

Max Gail Jr. on the next “Make No Bones About It.” 8-10-2014 5pm

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Max Gail, Secretary of the Board, is a teacher, actor, musician and director and has a degree in Economics from Williams College and an MBA from the  University of Michigan.  Max has been involved in social and environmental  activism for the last 30 years.  He also founded Local Access Places (LAP), which  was SEE’s first project.

Back in 1980, portable video was very new and I had been playing a cop in the Barney Miller TV show and spending the rest of my time on the life learning curve with AIM (American Indian Movement) and MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy) activists. I felt there was a way to share the connectedness we humans have to each other and all of life that is expressed in the Lakota prayer Mitakuye Oyasin…”for all my relations.” Inspired by “on the road” story telling from Jack Kerouac to Charles Kuralt, and anticipating perhaps music videos and Real People/Real World TV, I collaborated with film makers, artists and activists to integrated audio video recording with our travels and gatherings throughout the year. I thought of it as a “docu-musical,” and called it “For All My Relations.” At the center were my two inspiring older brothers Floyd Red Crow Westerman and David Amram. A small piece of that video is in the wonderful film being premiered at the festival this year, “David Amram: The first 80 Years.” But it was all “too radical” for the ABC network at the time in a country that was swinging into the Reagan era.

 

Jewell James, ot the Lummi Nation on KAOS radio 89.3 fm, July 13, 2014, 5:00-5:30pm

10487313_10152068955001887_6557126353205447199_nLummi Carver Jewell James 2014 Totem Pole Journey

The journey to bring attention to the adverse effects on Native and non-Native communities in the path of the coal, Bakken oil, and tarsands oil. The 18-food totem pole, carved by Jewell James, will begin its journey on the west coast in mid-August and culminate in early September when it will be raised at Peace River, in the heart of the tarsands territory in Alberta. Please show support in any way you can.

Ta’Kaiya Blaney shares her heart on “Make No Bones About It.” at 5:30pm on 6/15/2014

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12 year old Ta’Kaiya Blaney is Sliammon First Nation from B.C., Canada. Along with singing, songwriting, and acting, she is concerned about the environment, especially the preservation of marine and coastal wildlife. She travels and speaks on protecting indigenous lands worldwide from unsustainable development.

 

More about Ta’Kaiya Blaney

Raven visits with Kisa of Goodthinking, March 30, 2014, 5pm

OUR MISSION

To act and operate exclusively as a public charity, nonprofit corporation pursuant to the laws of the state of Washington, and operate as a community organization which serves to support Native American Indians with charitable programs, that advance quality of life while promoting social dignity though relief of the poor, the distressed and the underprivileged. Honoring all path’s of cultural and spiritual traditions.
http://4allourrelations.org/

Raven visits with Chief Phil Lane Jr., 3-16-2014 at 5:00pm

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Chief Phil Lane Jr. is a traditionally recognized Hereditary Chief and Elder. He is an enrolled member of the Ihanktonwan Dakota and Chickasaw Nations, and is a citizen of both Canada and the United States

Keith and Chenoa Egawa share about their new book “Tani’s Search for the Heart” on Make No Bones About It. 4:30 pm, 2-23-2014

Tani's Search

Keith and Chenoa Egawa are a brother and sister writing and illustrating team of Lummi and S’Klallam Indian ancestry. Keith is a novelist ( Madchild Running) with a background in education reform and social work. Chenoa is a singer, stoyterller and ceremonial leader, who has worked as a professional illustrator, international indigenous human rights advocate and educator.

Book Cover

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Raven visits with Dennis Banks- 2-9-2014 at 4PM

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Dennis Banks is a Native American leader, teacher, lecturer, activist, and author. He is an Anishinabe, Ojibwa, born on Leech Lake Indian Reservation in northern Minnesota. In 1968 he co-founded the American Indian Movement (AIM), and establishing it to protect the traditional ways of Indian people and to engage in legal cases protecting treaty rights of Natives-such as hunting and fishing, trapping, wild riceing.

Banks earned an Associates of Arts degree at Davis University and taught at Deganawida Quetzecoatl (DQ) University (an all Indian-controlled institution), where he became the first American Indian chancellor.

In 1994, Banks led the four-month Walk for Justice (WFJ) from Alcatraz Island in San Francisco to Washington, DC. The purpose was to bring public awareness to current Native issues. Banks agreed to head the “Bring Peltier Home” campaign in 1996 bringing Native Americans and other supporters together in a national drive for executive clemency for political prisoner Leonard Peltier.

He also had roles in the movies War Party, The Last of the Mohicans, and Thunderheart. A musical tape “Still Strong” featuring Banks’ original work as well as traditional Native American songs was completed in’93 and a musical video with the same name was released in’95.

Source: American Indian Movement

 http://www.aimovement.org/iitc/index.html#BANKS

http://www.dennisbanks.org/index.php/biography-short